first_imgROALD DAHL FANS might have a new reason to be “whoopsy whiffling”, as Oxford University Press has published a new dictionary compiling Dahl’s words to celebrate the centenary of the illustrious storyteller’s birth.The Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary features almost 8000 real, and invented, “extra-usual” words known as “gobblefunk”, that Dahl used in his work for children. The dictionary is also illustrated by Sir Quentin Blake, and its release is an opportune precursor to the upcoming Steven Spielberg film adaptation of The BFG.The dictionary was researched and compiled by a team led by lexicographer Dr Susan Rennie over a period of five years. It showcases Dahl’s literary artistry, such as his adoption of spoonerisms and malapropisms, and his play with puns, sound and much more.Examples of such literary creativity include “delumptious”, which means delicious, “whoopsy whiffling”, which means exciting, and “rotsome” which means unpleasant. “Dahl’s literary creations also were reflective of his personal life”, Head of OUP Children’s Dictionaries Vineeta Gupta told Cherwell.An example of such would be that in Matilda, a parrot called Chopper actually alluded to Dahl’s real-life Jack Russell terrier. “Matilda” also means “mighty in battle” and was a frequent name given to tanks used in North Africa during WWII, where Roald Dahl served as a RAF pilot.Gupta said the dictionary was meant to be an insight into Dahl’s creativity, and in particular to encourage children aged eight and above to “write more”. It also has the “rigour” of a “real and fully-functioning dictionary”.“Roald Dahl’s work is timeless and he is the number one children storyteller in the world. How can we not have made such a compilation? We hope that this dictionary will be enjoyed by children, parents and grandparents alike from all over the world”, she said.“I think it’s absolutely great that one of the wittiest, most creative, and most jubilant authors of all time has been featured in his own dictionary.” said Jonathan Yeung, a second-year PPEist at Oriel.“Language leaves such a big impact on all of us, and every good language needs to have people who are willing to stretch it, give it dynamism and life. Roald Dahl is one of these people”, he continued.Michelle Sum, a second-year lawyer also at Oriel, thought the same and told Cherwell, “Oxford is proving itself not to be archaic and boring by giving its seal of approval to Roald Dahl’s creations.”“Children around the world can now rejoice in knowing that they can call their teacher who give them too much homework a cracfficult oompa loompa. What will be next? Perhaps a sign for a Harry Potter dictionary to come?”last_img read more


first_imgUnder further planned changes, mothers will be able to nominate their husband or partner to take over all or part of the year’s remaining maternity leave to which they are entitled.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/relationships/fatherhood/10686200/New-fathers-shun-chance-to-share-maternity-leave.html The Telegraph 11 March 2014Only one in 50 new fathers currently take up the chance to share up to six months of their wife or partner’s maternity leave, figures show.Fears of damaging their career prospects and having to struggle on a lower income have deterred all but a tiny minority of fathers eligible for the extra leave, a study concludes. Under new rules championed by Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, fathers can now request to have to 26 weeks on top of the standard fortnight’s paternity leave as long as the mother is not also taking her full allocation.center_img Research by the law firm EMW found that of the 2009,000 fathers who took the usual two weeks last year only 4,000 – or two per cent – went on to take  “additional statutory” paternity leave.last_img read more


first_imgBruno Mars performed Friday at USC’s Gearfest 2010: Sex in Public, which was held Friday on McCarthy Quad. The event, which was described as “a portrayal of sexual evolution through fashion,” was hosted by Eva Marcille Pigford, the winner of the third cycle of America’s Next Top Model. Sponsored by Program Board, the event also featured performances by Travie McCoy and Mateo.Heather Lee | Daily Trojanlast_img


first_imgAction in the KCCA game on Tuesday. KCCA won to stay top of the table with 9 points. PHOTO KCCAUPL Tuesday resultsKCCA     2   Soana         0SC Villa 1  JMC Hippos 0Express 1   Onduparaka 1,BUL      0   Saints 1URA      1   Vipers 1Kirinya 0   Sadolin 0Police    0  Proline 0Brightstars 0 Lweza 1KCCA continued their perfect start as the Azam Uganda Premier League (UPL) resumed Tuesday.Joseph Ochaya scored a rebound after his penalty was stopped by Soana goalkeeper Didi Muhammed, with a second coming from Muzamir Mutyaba as KCCA got a third straight league win.Mike Mutebi got one over his former colleague Sam Ssimbwa. They worked together at the start of the 2015/16 season but Ssimbwa’s contract was terminated for alleged match fixing.There were also wins for 16-time league champions SC Villa courtesy of a Ambrose Kirya goal, while Vipers and Express were held. Share on: WhatsApp Onduparaka, coached by Livingstone Mbabazi and Moses Oloya continued to show they are made for the top league, by snatching a point away at Wankulukuku.  They next host KCCA in Arua on Friday.What had been dubbed the game of the day, URA versus Vipers, ended in a frustrating draw.Erisa Ssekisambu’s late goal helped secure a draw for Vipers after Bokota Labama Kamana had put URA in charge earlier.last_img read more


first_imgSubmitted by Barb Lally for Rob Rice HomesThe Rice family believes in giving back to the community they love.Throughout the entire year Rob Rice and his family generously provide time and support for organizations where they can make a real difference.“We feel it is our responsibility to give back to the community where we have been building homes for more than 30 years,” says Rob. “This is where we live, work and raise our children, and we want to help make it a better place for our family and those in the communities we build.”Their efforts extend far beyond issuing a check to the causes they believe in, they back their support with real action. In 2011 Rob and his wife Helena had determined that they needed to specify a goal for annual giving so they made the decision to prioritize children’s needs and homeless pets as causes to help. Now they extend their hands and hearts to two organizations that improve the lives of children and that aid rescue animals.“There are so many well-deserving charities in our community but we needed to pinpoint two so we could really make a difference,” says Helena.Caring for Animals“When I married Rob, I had three rescue dogs and he was living in a pet-free home; it was quite a change for him,” laughs Helena, who grew up in a family that has always helped animals in need. “It didn’t take long though and within a few months he was traveling around with one of my dogs and even taking her to the office to work for the day.”Now she says Rob has a soft heart for rescue animals, even picking them up in communities where he builds to make sure they get to their“Lewis” was lucky to be rescued by Rob Rice on I-5.homes or a shelter where they can be helped.“Just recently Rob stopped on I-5 on the North Fork Lewis River Bridge in Clark County when he saw a confused dog running in the freeway,” Helena says. “Rob had to crawl underneatha truck to eventually get the poor thing out. Rob brought the dog home, took him for veterinary care and we took care of him until we found the perfect owner. One of our staff is now the dog’s proud owner so Rob still gets to see ‘Lewis’ who is named after the bridge where he was rescued.”Every year, the Rice’s, along with other business owners, sponsor a fundraising auction for Concern for Animals, an organization that for 34 years has assisted low income families with the food and medical needs of their pets and rescue animals. But they wanted to do more.“Rob and Helena met with us and asked how they could help us,” says Janey Hanson president of Concern for Animals. “We had bought an older 1920s home for our offices after operating out of people’s homes for years. We showed them our lengthy wish list so they could pick a project. What happened next was amazing.”The new Concern for Animals building was completely remodeled by Rob Rice and his sub-contractors at no charge.Janey says that the local builder sought the help of many of his sub-contractors who donated their time and materials to completely remodel the home. Rob even assigned one of his superintendents to coordinate the work. The long list of sub-contractors who contributed is on the group’s website.“They cleaned out our project wish list,” says Janey. “They even sent in a designer so we could pick our color pallet. They remodeled the kitchen with new flooring, cabinets, counters and backsplash; they fixed a major drainage problem under the house and repaired the basement so we had plenty of room for our food bank. They painted, fixed our ceiling, worked on our heating system and did electrical work and even leveled our parking lot. The list is long.”The group says it would have taken years to complete but Rob and his sub-contractors did it all in just a few months resulting in an office and food bank that will help hundreds of pet owners and their animals.Contributing to Kids “Our son Alex attended the Hands On Children’s Museum of Olympia school for 3 years,” says Helena. “When Rob and I went to his first parent-teacher conference, we realized what a unique learning atmosphere it is and how beneficial the museum is to children in our community, so we decided we wanted to donate our time and resources to this great institution.”Helena began co-chairing the museum’s fundraising breakfast that provides admission for Free Friday Night and then when the new museum was in design stages both she and Rob agreed to provide an entire exhibit that offers kids an experience in construction, a field they know a bit about. The Build It! exhibit allows children to don hard hats and safety goggles while they use builder boards to build a home or they create a Keva structure.Around the CommunityThe Build It! exhibit, contributed by the Rice’s, gets rave reviews at the Hands on Children’s Museum.There are many other organizations where Helena and Rob donate their time and resources.Rob is a lifetime director for the Olympia Master Builders Association and an active board member of Thurston Economic Development Council. He is also well known for presiding over the Home Owners Associations in the communities he builds to help maintain their quality and value.Rob is a founder of Thurston First Bank, initially helping to start the bank and currently chairing several committees for its board. Helena is a shareholder in the bank as well.Helena has served on boards for the Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council and the Thurston County Chamber of Commerce and currently volunteers for the PTO program at East Olympia Elementary, Alex’s school.The Rice’s support Saint Martin’s University, Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County and the South Sound YMCA and Rob coaches most of his children’s sports teams, whether it is basketball, football or baseball.Helena admits it all keeps them very busy yet they don’t usually turn away requests for help.“We feel overjoyed to help out this amazing community,” she says. “It is a proven fact that people who give are happier and healthier. That is sure true in our family’s case.”Rob Rice is Thurston County’s largest local home builder and was voted the Best of South Sound for 2013. He has built more than 3000 homes over the last 30 years. He and his wife Helena live in Olympia with their two sons; Alex Michael and Carson. Rob is a graduate of Washington State University with degrees in construction management and architecture. Facebook25Tweet0Pin0last_img read more


first_imgThe Trafalgar Girl’s Volleyball team earned the elite status after capturing the West Kootenay Junior Girl’s Volleyball Championships Saturday at Mount Sentinel Gymnasium in South Slocan.It was Trafalgar versus Trafalgar in the final, with Trafalgar winning the title.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to bestow the honour on the Trafalgar squad of Team of the Week.The squad includes: coach Staci Proctor, Amanda Creak, Maia Thibault, Alicia Griko, Lily Huttemann, Sophie Borhi, Mimi Lockhurst, Maia Robertson-Weir, Jaydon Rushton, Brynn Belland, Kristin Vanhorne, Rylee Zondervan, Michaela Anderson, Camryn Parnell, Bryce Winters, Reece Hunt, Shayla Elias, Olivia Kelly, Sophie Edney, Finn Pitcairn and Maren Kernan. They’re back in the Mallard’s Team of the Week winner’s circle.last_img read more


first_imgFrom an elite event of standard distance the Wasa Triathlon, in the Kootenays of B.C., has transformed into one of the most family friendly festival weekends in Western Canada. The event has grown over the last 20 years from 90 competitors to over 1000 participants with nearly one quarter being young triathletes aged between four to 15 years old. Race director, Charlie Cooper says “the event attracts families from all over B.C., Alberta and North West USA.”  “The growth in recent years has been led by the number of young triathletes coming with their families.  We are proud to cater for all ages with the first event day being dedicated to support our younger competitors.”On Saturday June 11, the Trikids Triathlon will again see a large group of smiley kids crossing the finish line for a well-earned medal.  Cooper explains that all young competitors will get to enjoy the same race experience as the adults: professional announcer Steve King, loads of volunteer support, drink stations, electronic timing, the exciting finish chute lined up with spectators, a catered lunch and a groovy t-shirt. “We want these young triathletes to love the sport, experience the competition but above all it’s about participation and having a fun weekend with the family,” Cooper said.”Many Albertan families use the Wasa triathlon as a camping weekend, enjoying the long summer mountain days and impressive setting.” For mums and dads there is some serious racing to be had on the Sunday with the sprint and standard distances both for individual and relay teams.The scenic shores of Wasa Lake attract amateurs and elite triathletes to compete in this swim-bike-run event. First-timers in the sport also target this event as a must-do to kick off their season. It’s not only the picturesque mountain scenery and pure air that attracts competitors says Cooper, the prize money is good too, with $4,300 to be awarded to the top five finishers in the women and men categories. The quality of the competition every year makes Wasa’s standard course one of the most competitive and fastest. All TriKids receive some good orienteering and preparation to make it a fun, memorable and safe experience. Many parents report young ones sleeping with their medals and proudly wearing their Wasa event shirt to school! Registration at www.rmevents.com closes June 9 for Adults & TriKids.last_img read more


first_imgDog and dog’s best friend, CacheDweebDid you know there are groups of gadget cache builders who slave away, day after day, week after week, huddled deep inside cluttered garages, endlessly tinkering with magnets, locks, pulleys, springs, clasps, and other such bric-a-brac? They do this for you, to put a smile on your face, and in turn, an even bigger smile on their own. Meet one such clever cache creator, CacheDweeb. His claw-machine, drawer-popping, and sound-enhanced DONKEY KACHE was featured as a Geocache of the Week. We ask a few questions, get a few answers, and learn the method behind the madness of this master cache owner. Geocache of the Week: DONKEY CACHEGeocaching HQ: What’s your background outside of geocaching?CacheDweeb: I work in IT. I’m not an engineer, but I love tinkering with things and figuring how stuff works. I like biking, hiking, and kayaking and besides geocaching, my hobbies include woodworking and building/flying giant scale radio controlled airplanes.CacheDweeb at a kayak event GC766XYGeocaching HQ: How and when did you hear about geocaching?CacheDweeb: My brother introduced me to geocaching in 2015. He had been doing it for 6 months, and then explained it to me while we were on a camping trip. After going out and finding a few caches with him, I was hooked. I already hike/bike/kayak, so geocaching just adds more to outdoor adventures.Geocaching HQ: What got you hooked?CacheDweeb: After finding about 200 caches, I happened to stumble across one of WVTim’s gadget cache videos. Once I saw that, those were the caches that I wanted to find. Not having anything like that in my immediate area, I decided to build a gadget cache and put it out. The local cachers loved it. Since then that’s what I’ve been building and placing.Geocaching HQ: What keeps you engaged in the game?CacheDweeb: I think what keeps me engaged are my friends. Since I’ve started geocaching, I met a lot of great cachers who are now some of my closest friends. I don’t get out to cache as often as I like, but I belong to a committee called the C-Mass Geofest (Central Massachusetts) who work with the Sturbridge Tourist Association and the Chamber of Commerce. We’ve been hosting large Event Caches for four years now.I also belong to a local Gadget Cache Builders group. It is a secret closed group on Facebook, with about 25 gadget cache builders, including WVTim. It is strictly for builders only, as the information on there is all spoilers. We share our projects, our skills and experience, and our friendships. They are all a great group of people.Geocaching HQ: For you, what makes a quality cache?CacheDweeb: One that is well maintained and fits its surroundings, whether it’s camouflaged or in plain sight. Of course, I love gadget caches, but I also like ‘unique’ hides, or what I call “something other than Tupperware”.Geocaching HQ: What’s the best approach to take when creating a geocache?CacheDweeb: I think the best approach is to choose materials for the container which blend in with its surroundings, and most of all, hold up to the climate it is placed in. As far as the best approach to creating gadget caches, you need to make them as bullet-proof as possible. Use materials that will hold up to a large number of cachers poking, pulling, and pushing everything on it. Also, you need to select the correct materials for the type of climate it will be in. For example, here in New England, we get everything from heat, wet, cold, and chill-to-the-bone frozen. Using wood for push/pull rods or slides won’t last because the wood swells in the humidity. You can use plastic or metal, which will work better and last much longer. Also, you need to test, test, test before you have your gadget cache published. I have my muggle family and friends test my gadget caches so I can see what works and what might need improvement.Think it, build it, test it, hide it. Oh, and maintain it!Geocaching HQ: Do you find it difficult to perform maintenance on gadget caches?CacheDweeb: In the beginning, yes. After many builds, you learn to spot problem areas before they become problems. The right materials are key. For example, rather than using kite string through pulleys, you’re better off using high-strength fishing line since it’s much more durable and will last a lot longer than any other string. I found this out the hard way on my DONKEY KACHE gadget cache. It was published just before a large event. The original string originally could not hold up to the wear and tear of so many cachers using it on one weekend. Geocaching HQ: Have you ever had an idea that you thought was impossible?CacheDweeb: Sure, all the time! As a builder, I keep a notebook that I add ideas to, so I don’t forget them. And they come to you in the oddest places. Once I was at my nephew’s hockey game. After the game, some of his teammates skated over to get off the ice and pushed down on a button on the top of the rink gate. On the outside of the gate where I was standing, it was open, so you could see how everything worked. At that moment, I had no idea what I would ever use that locking mechanism for, but I just had to take a photo of it with my phone for my “You never know” folder.Geocaching HQ: Do you have any great ideas brewing?CacheDweeb: This year, I started learning how to code caches with sound effects. Since I have a background as an IT developer with various code languages, the learning curve was easy. I’m building a payphone gadget cache that will ring and accept certain phone numbers. It should be out in the spring of 2019.Geocaching HQ: If someone was looking to you for inspiration what would you tell them?CacheDweeb: You don’t necessarily need to have skills or power tools to put out a creative cache. You just need your imagination. It doesn’t have to be as complicated as a gadget cache. I think the average cacher would rather find a unique container over Tupperware any day.CacheDweeb is number one!Geocaching HQ: Thanks so much for talking with us. Any last thoughts on geocaching?CacheDweeb: The great thing about geocaching is you can do it pretty much anywhere. If you’re on a business trip, or out on vacation somewhere, you can always take a look around to find out if there are any caches nearby. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedDONKEY KACHE — Geocache of the WeekDecember 19, 2018In “Community”Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniacMarch 12, 2019In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Auburn Sea (GC3QGYZ) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 3, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more


first_imgThe MPA, the Association of Magazine Media, has selected a new leader after 13 years—Mary Berner will replace outgoing Nina Link as the group’s new president and CEO effective September 17.Most recently, Berner was president and CEO of Reader’s Digest Association (RDA), a position she vacated in April 2011. Berner had guided RDA through a pre-packaged bankruptcy, officially emerging from Chapter 11 protection in February 2010.  A year later, she left the company just as it named a new board of directors.Berner was also a board member of RDA from 2007 to 2011. Under her direction, the company launched 83 websites, and 31 mobile applications; Allrecipes.com expanded into 22 countries, and Reader’s Digest Magazine became one of the Kindle’s best-selling monthly magazines. Nina Link, who has been MPA’s president and CEO for the last 13 years, announced in June she was stepping down. Her tenure at the top spot with the association was longer than any MPA president in its 93-year history.In the past, Berner served on the board of MPA—the association includes 225 domestic magazine media companies with more than 1,000 titles, nearly 50 international companies and more than 100 associate members.”I love a challenge—especially when the facts are on our side—as is the case with the strengths of magazine media,” says Berner in a release.  “I’m bullish on the fact that magazine brands offer their consumers and advertisers incredibly powerful and unique value on every platform.  I look forward to working with the MPA board to strongly and loudly push our member organization’s agenda forward. The industry deserves nothing less.”last_img read more