first_imgPool photo by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo / Flickr.ALBANY — Saying the federal government learned nothing in how it conducted COVID-19 testing, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called into question the proposed vaccination plan during a Friday conference call.The federal approach to use private vaccine providers such as Walgreen, CVS and other private pharmacies is a mirror of what Cuomo called a testing debacle.“The administration is locked in on this private sector plan,” Cuomo said.The current plan could take up to a year or more to vaccinate everyone, Cuomo said, adding the country can’t afford a year of time to vaccinate people. “We know the capacity of the network because we now have it engaged,” he said. “It could take one year to vaccinate. Their fundamental plan while simplistic is deeply flawed.”Cuomo said the federal government will not supply any funding to state’s to set up their own vaccination plans.“The federal govt will not provide any funding to speak of for a state to set up a supplemental network,” Cuomo said.“We just can’t afford it,” he said. “Their plan is just to fund the private sector providers. It operationally would be highly inefficient and it’s a direct mirror of the testing debacle. They’ve learned nothing.”“They handed it to the states. ‘New York State, you do the testing,’ ‘Will you provide us funding,’ ‘No,’ ” Cuomo said. “Will you provide us any materials,’ ‘No.’ This nation has been abysmal with testing.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Cuomo is an ass. He has led the state with the most deaths from covid than any other state in the union. He killed people in nursing homes because of his order that the homes take covid patients. Since we are the highest taxed state in the union why does he need government funding. He has to go or there will be no one left in the state.last_img read more


first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg Businessweek:As President Donald Trump prepares to pay failing coal plants to stay open, several states are hatching plans to gently put them to sleep. One solution gaining steam among lawmakers, environmentalists, and policy experts can be found in an unlikely place: the bond market.For utilities, getting out of the coal business can be costly. They have to pay to dismantle generators, and they don’t want to miss out on future revenue by scrapping still-productive assets early. Plus, coal-plant workers will need to be retrained for other jobs. To pay for all that, states could allow utilities to issue special bonds at low rates. While the plan has yet to be implemented, Colorado, New Mexico, and Missouri are among the states where legislation has been debated.“If there’s a no-cost option available to the state, I think it would be absurd to not do it,” says Jacob Candelaria, a Democratic state senator in New Mexico. Candelaria sponsored a bill that failed to pass and plans to reintroduce it next year. No tax dollars would be spent for such bonds, he says, but the debt would be backed by ratepayers. That means the utility can add a special charge to customers’ bills to cover the payments. The predictable cash flow means the bonds can carry lower rates. For years, coal’s been losing out to cheaper natural gas and cleaner renewables such as wind and solar. Coal-fired facilities accounted for more than half of U.S. electricity from 1949 through 2005, according to the Energy Information Administration. Since then, its share has declined to less than one-third of the U.S. total.Strategies for managing the transition vary. The operators of New England’s power grid have instituted a plan, sometimes called “cash for clunkers,” that includes—as a side effect to making room for new clean energy sources—paying old plants to retire. Trump, who has struggled to fulfill a campaign promise to help the coal industry, announced on June 1 that he was ordering Energy Secretary Rick Perry to stem the tide of closures. The government would establish a “strategic electric generation reserve” and compel grid operators to buy electricity from coal and nuclear plants. The administration says this is to protect national security. Still, many state and local authorities—and even a lot of utilities—see coal-plant shuttering as inevitable. Almost two dozen coal plants, with a combined capacity of more than 16 gigawatts, are scheduled to close in 2018, according to data compiled by Bloomberg New Energy Finance from the EIA and the Sierra Club. Another 30 gigawatts’ worth of plants are slated to follow suit by the end of 2025.It’s just a question of how the process unwinds. Candelaria estimates his legislation would have allowed utility PNM Resources Inc. to issue bonds that would pay 1 percent to 3 percent, as long as the proceeds were spent on shutting a coal plant. If PNM had to issue bonds on its own to do the same thing, it might have to pay interest of 6 percent to 8 percent, the lawmaker says. The exact rates would depend on a variety of factors, but “we’re talking about real money,” Candelaria says. Ron Darnell, senior vice president of public policy for PNM, calls the strategy “an equitable way to facilitate the transition to newer, cleaner energy resources.”More: Buy Bonds, Kill Coal States turn to bond market to fund decommissioning of coal plantslast_img read more