first_imgThe Oxford Guild has announced that Kanye West will be giving a talk at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.At 11pm this evening (March 1st), the Guild’s Facebook page created an event entitled “Kanye West speaks to the Oxford Guild Business Society”, and reported that West would be speaking at the Museum of Natural History tomorrow (March 2nd), at 3pm.According to the event page, the first batch of tickets will go on sale at midnight, with further releases at 2am, and at 9am tomorrow morning.Students were encouraged to sign up to a random ballot for tickets. However, the organisers were keen to emphasise that students would be chosen completely at random.The Guild told Cherwell that as of 12.30am, over 1,800 students had balloted for tickets.Once selected, students will have two hours in which to buy their tickets before the link expires.Abbas Kazmi, Chairman of the Oxford Guild, told Cherwell, “We are very excited to be hosting such an inspiring and high profile a speaker as the legendary Kanye West and expect it to be a fascinating and memorable event.“It is great to see the hard work pay off after having spent many hours negotiating against the odds and keeping things under wraps to secure this event, which is a real coup for the Guild, which I am proud to see continuing to grow from strength to strength, reaching even higher heights and winning ever more national awards and accolades.”He continued to thank the Guild committee, and went on to say, “This is the first in a series of incredibly high profile speakers the Guild has lined up. We have been working industriously behind the scenes and would recommend you watch this space!” There has been no word yet on the subject of West’s speech, but the rapper has been outspoken about business in recent years, condeming, among others, Louis Veitton.West is in the UK for the Brit Awards, where he performed on February 25th, revealing on Twitter last night that his upcoming album is to be titled So Help Me God.So Help Me God pic.twitter.com/e3UUsQQEts— KANYE WEST (@kanyewest) March 1, 2015Kazmi also told Cherwell that a full video of the talk will be available, and explained the reasoning behind the event’s ticketing system. “We do not want students to waste their afternoons queuing outside the Union chamber Frewin Court for example, only not to be let in and to be left disappointed. Nor do we want students to ballot and then not turn up leaving empty seats which have been taken by others.”He also emphasised that only Oxford-registered emails would be valid in the ballot.Sean O’Neill, of Hertford College, was one of the first students to secure a ticket. He remarked to Cherwell, “I get to be in the same room as Kanye West! This is so great it almost makes me like the Oxford Guild.”Oliver Johnston-Watt, a member of the general committee, commented, “Aside from the executive, only two other committee members knew about this. When the first e-mail came in I thought it was some kind of joke but with Kanye being in the UK at the moment for the Brits it all started to make sense.He remarked that it was “absolutely outrageous for any student society to bring in a speaker like Kanye West.“Clearly,” he continued, “the Oxford Guild mean business.”last_img read more


first_img The population of Polish-speaking children in German territory is charted in this data map, one of many factors taken into consideration when redrawing national borders after the war. Another example of a large-scale map, which appears in the collection. The maps capture the magnitude of the war. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer The military, social, economic, and political effects of those crucial shifts are highlighted by the maps on display — handmade, one of a kind, or mass-produced. Some were brought home and donated to Harvard by alumni who had served.Mapmaking advanced more quickly during WWI than in any previous era. Prewar methods, such as relying on known landmarks, were often useless — landmarks could be destroyed or inaccessible. Trench warfare required soldiers to rely on data. Engineers developed sophisticated ways to gather information, recording flashes and booms from enemy cannons to triangulate location, exploiting the photographic potential of air power to create documents that saved lives.A guide to reading the aerial images points to the challenges presented by tilt, scale, and bomb-cratered terrain. “It’s hard to tell where anything is when everything looks like the moon,” said Bonnie Burns, curator of the exhibit and librarian for geographic information services.Plenty of WWI-era maps were not for military use; they were communications tools aimed at illustrating to the home front what was happening in strange and faraway places. Newspapers printed thousands. “They were trying to explain why they were fighting — if anybody knew,” Burns said.A 1914 German map depicts nations straining against borders; a 1918 U.S. map shows Germany as a looming black cloud poised to descend on Europe. Small details like fonts — gothic for German towns, modern for French — hint at the perspective behind the document.The fighting stopped but the mapmaking continued, recognizing new boundaries and new nations. Belgium, France, and Denmark expanded; Poland, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Finland, and Yugoslavia formed.“The maps are amazingly detailed,” said Burns. “As a mapmaker, I wondered how they accomplished that in war conditions with the technology of the time. As a librarian I saw an amazing visual data set I thought researchers would be interested in.” Burns captured the scale and detail of the front in a single map by scanning 300 plans directeurs (detailed maps made by French soldiers), extracting data on trench positions and transposing it on modern road maps.In her final work, trenches vein across land, a bloody graph of months, years, lives, telling a cartographic story of convulsing cultures and wrenching change. The mapmaker’s editorial spin is evident in this 1914 caricature map, which shows each country with a unique persona. Germany strains against its borders, Serbia attempts to throw a bomb at Osterreich while Turkey holds a lit candle under a Crimean powder keg. Images courtesy of the Harvard Map Collection The new field of aerial photography was an invaluable tool to wartime mapmakers, but images could be difficult to read correctly. An original photo shows the extent of damage to the landscape; the resulting map below was adjusted for tilt, scale, and angle. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer World War I lasted four years, three months, two weeks, and one day. Dozens of nations were involved; more than 65 million soldiers were mobilized; casualties rose to 37 million. The Western Front stretched 600 miles through three countries.“From the Alps to the Ocean: Maps of the Western Front,” at Pusey Library through Nov. 11, captures the magnitude of the conflict, each map a shard of the shattered mirror reflecting a gruesome war.Life on the Western Front depended on a labyrinth of trenches quickly and gruelingly dug into battle positions in 1914. Roads, railways, trails, shelters, and ammunition depots sprang up behind the lines, absorbing towns and cities. Small conquests of territory represented big wins — and big losses — in the fight that shaped modern Europe and the Middle East. Mapping a war Curator Bonnie Burns used hundreds of plans directeurs, such as this one detailing the Argonne Forest in 1918, in order to pull together the comprehensive map of the Western Front. Red represents Allied-controlled territory, blue German-held lines. This 1918 rendering shows the enormity of the territory controlled by Central Powers in gray. Published in a magazine for an American audience, the map was advertised as a way to follow the “adventures” of soldiers on the front.last_img read more


first_imgDhito, however, added that he had yet to secure the backing of any political party to join the race, including the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), of which his father is a member. Late last week, Dhito attended a gathering organized by PDI-P’s Kediri branch, which is led by Agus Sunoto, Pramono’s brother-in-law and Dhito’s uncle. Agus told the gathering that Dhito was running in the upcoming regency election. Pramono, a former PDI-P secretary-general, said that, as Dhito’s father, he would support his son’s bid once the PDI-P declared its support for Dhito. “Once it is decided by the PDIP [to nominate Dhito as its regent candidate] then we will communicate with the chairmen of other political parties. I meet with them almost everyday as fellow Cabinet members,” he said on Saturday. The PDI-P holds the most seats in the Kediri Regional Legislative Council (DPRD) with 15 out of 50 seats, ahead of the National Awakening Party (PKB), which has nine seats, and the Golkar Party, which has six seats. To run in a regional election, a candidate must have the support of a party or coalition that holds at least 20 percent of seats in the DPRD. Dhito is not the only political blueblood set to take part in the upcoming regional elections. President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s eldest son Gibran Rakabuming Raka has officially registered with the PDI-P to run in the 2020 Surakarta mayoral election in Central Java, while Jokowi’s son-in-law Bobby Nasution has also registered with both the PDI-P and Golkar to run in the 2020 Medan mayoral race in North Sumatra. Vice President Ma’ruf Amin’s daughter Siti Nur Azizah is also set to run for South Tangerang mayor in Banten. Topics : Hanindhito Himawan Pramana, the son of Cabinet Secretary Pramono Anung, confirmed his intention to take part in Kediri regency election in East Java, adding to the tally of children of government officials and politicians who will run in this year’s regional elections. “If asked whether I am ready or not, I am ready. But now I am still communicating with the leaders of a number of political parties starting from the central office to the village level branches,” Hanindhito or Dhito, as he is commonly known, told journalists on Saturday on the sidelines of an event at the Lirboyo pesantren (Islamic boarding school) in Kediri. The event was also attended by his father as well as Transportation Minister Budi Karya Sumadi and Public Works and Housing Minister Basuki Hadimuljono. last_img read more