first_imgIf you thought Amnesty International Aotearoa NZ were about human rights, you’d be totally wrong. You just need to read their submission supporting the decriminalisation of abortion.They start by saying“Our vision is for every person to enjoy all the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights standards.”Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 3, says that “Everyone has the right to life…“, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989, Preamble, says “the child, by reason of his physical and mental immaturity, needs special safeguards and care, including appropriate legal protection, before as well as after birth“…Good start – but what follows is completely the opposite message from this so-called human rights group…“We recognise that legal protection of human rights, including the right to life, commences at birth.”(Might as well scrap all those prenatal guidelines about mothers not drinking or smoking or singing to their unborn child or eating healthy etc)“We believe [Model A] will best ensure that access to safe abortions is effectively available to pregnant people (!!) to make their own decisions, free from barriers, delays or restrictions that could violate their human rights, including their reproductive autonomy.”Model A is abortion any time, for any reason, up to birth.“Criminalisation of abortion in any circumstances and denial of access to safe abortion services is a manifestation, cause and consequence of social systems that discriminate, deny personal and bodily autonomy and impose unequal burdens on the basis of individuals’ reproductive capacities and their pregnancy status, among other related factors.”Too bad about the ‘personal and bodily autonomy’ of unborn children, ‘discrimination’ against them, or ‘denial of access’ to life!And just to show how ‘woke’ Amnesty International is –“AIANZ therefore recommends that the Bill be clarified further and that it is made explicit that services should be available also to transgender people and people of other gender identities capable of becoming pregnant.”Um, if they can become pregnant, they’re a ‘woman’. We checked. It’s still a biological truth.Interestingly, the only highlight of their submission is their advocacy for the disabled community…“We affirm that the only way of supporting all prospective parents to make informed decisions about continuing or terminating their pregnancies is through affirmative measures, such as combating ableism in prenatal testing and counselling processes, ensuring all parents are operating in an enabling environment and have the social and economic supports they need to raise any child, including a child with disabilities or who is otherwise socially excluded, and promoting the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities in all spheres of public and private life.” That’s, of course, if they are actually allowed to be born.Ironically, they’re against the death penalty. Go figure.last_img read more


first_imgJamaica’s top-ranked squash players, Chris Binnie and Lewis Walters, will take on rivals from the United States in the KPMG International Squash Series, which is scheduled for December 8-9 at the Liguanea Club in New Kingston.Dubbed ‘Yankees vs Yardies’, the two-day extravaganza will see local stars Binnie and Walters facing their stiffest competition to date on local soil. The US contingent is comprised of Chris Gordon, currently ranked number 56 by the Professional Squash Association (PSA), and Chris Hanson, who is number 83 in the world.Binnie, who has dominated the game in Jamaica and the Caribbean for the last eight years, is currently at 76, while Walters is ranked at 110.Binnie will face off with Hanson on the first day of play, while Walters will be up against Gordon. The players will then trade opponents for another round of matches on day two.Strong undercardThe event will also feature a strong undercard, which will see Jamaica’s number three player, all-rounder Bruce Burrowes, going head-to-head with rising star Julian Morrison.Burrowes and Morrison will be back in action again in mixed doubles on day two, when they will be paired with 12-time All-Jamaica Ladies Champion Karen Anderson and five-time Caribbean Ladies Champion Marlene West, respectively.The KPMG series is being staged as a major fundraiser for the Jamaica Squash Association (JSA) as part of an effort to increase financing for its Junior Outreach Programme and also to provide support for Jamaica’s professional squash players. Binnie, Walters and Morrison currently compete on the PSA circuit, which involves travel, accommodation, medical and coaching expenses.”We are very excited about our professional squash series because it will expose local fans and newcomers to the game to an extraordinarily high standard of squash,” said president of the JSA, Chris Hind.”Chris and Lewis are the top two players in the Caribbean, but, in general, they don’t get a lot of strong competition on local soil; so we look forward to seeing them do battle with other world-ranked professional players, who will definitely test their skills.”The KPMG International Squash Series is also sponsored by Supreme Ventures, BCIC and the Liguanea Club.Tickets are on sale at the Liguanea Club at a cost of $1,500 for children, $3,000 for adults and $5,000 for VIP packages, which include food and beverages. Persons purchasing tickets for both nights can get two children’s tickets for $2,500, two adult tickets for $5,000 and two VIP passes for $8,000. Interested persons can call 371-0476.last_img read more