first_imgIn a series of town halls this week, University administrators announced changes to the structure of the First Year of Studies, discussed a new early retirement program and provided updates on new recycling standards and construction projects.In a response to a question about changes to the First Year of Studies, University provost Thomas Burish confirmed that the First Year of Studies would cease to operate as a separate college. Instead, he said advisors formerly from the First Year of Studies will now work with advisors from students’ majors. The core curriculum requirements will be spread over four years, rather than being concentrated in students’ first year. Additionally, students will now have the option to take courses for their major beginning their freshman year. Natalie Weber | The Observer John Affleck-Graces, executive vice president of Notre Dame, discusses reforms that the University is planning to implement in the final fall town hall held Wednesday evening held in Carey Auditorium.Burish said the changes will allow students to explore more majors by taking a variety of introductory courses during their first year. For those first year students who have already decided on a major, the new system will allow them to get a head start on their fields of study, Burish said.“You can start early, and if you made the wrong decision, you’ve got time to recover and get into another major because you have four years now to work these major decisions in,” he said.During the town hall, university administrators also announced an early retirement program for staff. Details regarding the program will be released in the next few weeks, executive vice president John Affleck-Graves said. “In essence, it will look very similar to the program we did in 2011,” he said. “Essentially, looking at people who are 62 years or older who have 10 years of service or people 55 years and older, with 15 years of service. And there will be some element of a lump sum payment that will be tied to the number of years you put in.”Staff members will have until March or April of next year to decide whether to retire early, Affleck-Graves said.The University is also implementing new recycling policies, Affleck-Graves said. In the past, recycling allowed for 10 percent contamination of materials.“Those rules have changed because the places that used to take the recycling materials will no longer take them,” Affleck-Graves said. “And so, the new rules are that we can only have a 0.5 to one percent contamination. So that’s going to change the way that we’re going to ask you to recycle.”Administrators are asking that members of the community follow the motto “When in doubt, throw it out.”“If you put that food contaminated, when you put a liquid in, you’ve destroyed the good that everybody else has done,” he said. “If everyone else is being rigorous in their recycling and you’re not, what they end up doing is condemning the entire lot.”During the town halls, administrators also provided information on construction projects across campus, including the demolition of McKenna Hall and Brownson Hall, the construction of a new art museum and updates on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II project.“If you’re worried about there not being enough construction on campus, you don’t have to worry,” Affleck-Graves said jokingly.McKenna Hall will be torn down and rebuilt on half of the current lot to match the building to current standards, Affleck-Graves said.“McKenna has served us well, but it’s not a very efficient space,” he said. “There’s lots of open space in it, and some of the rooms for meetings aren’t up to standards you typically get at conferences nowadays. So, we’ve had very generous benefactors who have given us the funds, so we will replace McKenna Hall.”Brownson Hall will also be torn down and the site will be used to create a new space for the Alliance for Catholic Education, Affleck-Graves said.Additionally, Affleck-Graves said construction on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II will be completed in approximately 18 months to two years. A new art museum, funded by Ernestine Raclin and her daughter and son-in-law Carmen and Chris Murphy, is also set to be constructed. Currently, administrators plan to build the museum at the site of the Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park. “Really, the long term dream of building this arts district on our campus really comes to fulfillment with an art museum, a sculpture park, school of architecture, performing arts, sacred music and the music library,” Affleck-Graves said. “So we’re really getting a beautiful area for the arts on campus.”During a town hall, Affleck-Graves also answered a question about whether Notre Dame’s food inspections would be kept private following its deal with St. Joseph County.“To me, it’s like filing our own taxes. … We were approached about that, we asked that they be kept private, for various reasons, as you know, that blew up in the press, so I think the agreement we have now, is that if we do them, we will make those public,” he said.University President Fr. John Jenkins also spoke at the town halls, addressing concerns about keeping Notre Dame financially accessible.“One challenge we have, and we all know it, a Notre Dame education for our students is extremely expensive,” he said. “It costs a lot of money, and we have to do everything we can to make a Notre Dame education affordable and make it effective. “To do that, we give financial aid as one of our top priorities, and we have to try to keep costs down. Because to the extent we are more efficient, we can accept more students, we can give them more financial aid, we can be more affordable, more accessible to our students.”Jenkins also addressed the sex abuse crisis facing the Catholic Church and encouraged staff members to report any concerns. Staff members can contact the University Integrity Line, Human Resources, Office of Institutional Equity or Audit and Advisory Services with any workplace concerns, Jenkins said.“If there is an issue, if there is a misconduct and if there is misbehavior, it allows us to investigate it professionally and adjudicate it correctly,” he said. “So let us have that opportunity — if you see something, say something.”Tags: Brownson Hall, Construction, Eddy Street Commons, Faculty Town Hall, fall town hall, First Year of Studies, McKenna Hall, recyclinglast_img read more


first_imgU.K. sets new wind generation record FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Strong gusts on Wednesday evening helped Britain’s wind farms to produce a record amount of electricity, trade group Renewable UK said on Friday.Britain aims to increase its renewable output and close its coal-fired power plants by 2025 as part of efforts to meet climate targets. “Britain’s onshore and offshore wind farms hit a new high of 14.9 gigawatts (GW) between 6 and 6.30pm on Wednesday evening,” the industry group said in a statement.Overall on Wednesday wind generated 32.2 percent of the country’s electricity more than any other electricity source. The figure beat the previous record of 14.5 GW set on Nov. 9.The country’s renewable electricity capacity overtook that of fossil fuel generators such as gas and coal for the first time this year. The world’s largest offshore wind farm, Orsted’s Walney Extension, opened off the northwest coast of England in September.More: Britain blows past wind power generation recordlast_img read more


first_imgTwo hundred and fifty-one students graduated from the Georgetown School of Nursing on Thursday. This number comprises 110 professionally registered nurses, 56 midwives and 85 nursing assistants.Leola Charles, a graduate from the Professional Nursing Programme of the Georgetown School of Nursing, and now a registered nurse, has emerged as the 2018 valedictorian. Charles, along with others, received special awards for their outstanding performances and special skills demonstrated throughout their course of studies.This year’s graduation marks the school’s 31st Biennial ceremony, where scores of young professionals have received certification to provide services in the public health sector. The graduation exercise was hosted at the National Cultural Centre.In her valedictory speech, Charles encouraged her batch along with those who have completed other programmes, to be trailblazers in their respective fields, as they transition fully into the world of work.“Let us leave a trail that others will be proud to follow. Class of 2018, as graduates, we face many uncertainties in both the immediate and distant future; however, it’s up to us to make a difference to have people say honourable things about us and leave the impression that you never gave up on yourself,” Charles is quoted by the Department of Public Information as saying.Charles was the recipient of the Public Health Minister’s Award and the first-ever PAHO/WHO award among several others in recognition of her stellar performanceValedictorian Leola Charles receives her award from Public Health Minister Volda Lawrenceboth in theory and clinical practices.In her address to the gathering, Public Health Minister Volda Lawrence said since her appointment to the sector, she has worked assiduously with the faculty of health sciences and education to make necessary changes to nursing education.To this end, the Minister expressed her confidence in the graduating batch’s preparedness to be deployed into the public health system. She further added that the citizens of Guyana can be reassured of quality health services being delivered to them by these professionals.The graduates were also encouraged to demonstrate an excellent level of patient care as they all have an important role to play as servants in the public health sector.“We at the Ministry recognise that you are the pillars of a sustainable and an effective health system the core of the next generation of nurses on whom Guyana will depend for a resilient and robust health structure,” Minister Lawrence said.Midwife Ann Ferguson-Goppy, registered Nurse Melissa Emanuel and Nursing Assistant, Sherl Daniels, all excitedly highlighted their journey to completing their individual programmes.The graduation ceremony saw several persons from this year’s batch receiving special awards in the areas of interpersonal skills, management and leadership qualities and overall outstanding performances in theoretical studies and clinical practices.Among those graduating was Batch 125A, who was a part of approximately 200 students, who retook the State Final Examinations and attained 100 per cent passes in 2017. This batch received timepieces compliments of PAHO/WHO in recognition of their overwhelming performance.The Georgetown-based nursing school have over the years been hit by many controversies. Last year, 150 students who wrote the nursing exams, which were allegedly compromised, had to rewrite the exams.An investigation was launched after it was reported that the nurse’s examination papers were leaked before the sitting and assessment of 250 nursing students.last_img read more