first_img Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter By Jon Zimney – November 18, 2020 0 543 Google+ Facebook Google+ WhatsApp (Photo supplied/U.S. Senator Todd Young) Senate Republicans are giving accolades to the Trump Administration and America’s front line workers as two pharmaceutical companies have developed viable vaccines for COVID-19.The two vaccines are from Pfizer and Moderna after they say their vaccine candidates have both shown over 90-percent effectiveness in clinical trials.“They, of course, will be seeking FDA approval in the coming days,” said Indiana Sen. Todd Young (R). “And there’s some other drugs online that are notable as well. Eli Lilly, out of Indianapolis, Indiana, has a drug that is targeted towards those who are most at risk of contracting the COVID-19 virus.”Young said without the help of Operation Warp Speed, which was pushed by the White House, these vaccines and treatments would likely not be possible at this juncture.As those vaccines seek FDA approval, Young is now calling on his Democratic colleagues in the U.S. Senate to once again work with Republicans on passing a coronavirus relief package.“We as legislators need to build on our CARES Act success by passing the next round of assistance,” Young said. “Small business assistance is especially important.”He accuses Democrats are of pushing “ideological policies” in their versions of COVID relief. Young said now is not the time for that and that he feels portions of his RESTART Act, which are part of Republican versions of the relief bill right now, are the best way to go in order to help small businesses. Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Young congratulates Trump Administration for quick work on vaccines Pinterest Previous articleIU School of Medicine looking for volunteers for COVI9-19 studyNext articleSt. Joseph County Health leaders issue series of recommendations to curb COVID-19 spread Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitterlast_img read more


first_imgSituated in the Monongahela National Forest in the north central West Virginia Highlands, Blackwater Canyon stands apart as one of the Mountain State’s best view points. Once used to haul lumber and coal through this sunning natural landscape, the Blackwater Canyon Trail is tailor-made for those seeking a sense if mountain solitude. In addition to expansive views of the West Virginia High Country and the Blackwater River below, be on the lookout for the endangered West Virginia flying squirrel, the Indiana bat, and the Cheat Mountain salamander. For directions to Blackwater Canyon here.[divider]More from Blueridgeoutdoors.com[/divider]last_img read more


first_imgChicago-based Boeing was already contending with a drop in advance payments from customers of its 737 Max aircraft, grounded after two crashes. Now that plane is nearing a return to service at a time when few airlines want new aircraft.The collapse in long-range flying threatens another critical source of cash for Boeing: deliveries of its 787 Dreamliners, which can carry passengers from Sydney to Chicago without refueling.Boeing said it is closely monitoring the market and customer needs. The company has already drawn down $7.5 billion of the $13.8 billion it borrowed in January to help bolster cash until the Max is back in the market.“Managing our liquidity and balance sheet are key focus areas,” a spokesman said, adding that it will “assess all levers to help provide adequate liquidity as we navigate the current challenges.”During periods of tumult, Toulouse, France-based Airbus sets up what it describes as a “watch tower.” That involves devoting extra personnel to help distressed customers delay aircraft orders, as well as letting opportunistic buyers jump the line. The company was able to move more than 600 orders around in this way between 2009 and 2011, following the last global economic shock.The European plane manufacturer is using the same system to manage coronavirus impact, as “commercial, production and finance teams monitor a number of parameters on a daily, weekly and monthly basis,” a spokesman said.Plunging trafficAirline traffic is expected to contract this year for only the fourth time since the Great Depression, although the full impact will depend on how long the Covid-19 virus continues to spread, said Ron Epstein, an analyst with Bank of America Corp. Oil prices are also plunging after Saudi Arabia decided to remove pricing curbs, giving airlines less incentive to trade in older, less fuel-efficient models.“We’re deflating from a very high altitude and that’s concerning,” said Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with Teal Group. “We’ve had one very bad year of traffic, and it’s going to be followed by an even worse year of traffic.”On the sidelines of last week’s ISTAT Americas conference of aircraft financiers, manufacturers and operators in Austin, Texas, executives looked for parallels to the industry slump that lasted two years after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. During that span, the compound annual growth rate of revenue for Boeing and Airbus and their constellation of suppliers was about minus 11 percent, by Aboulafia’s calculation.The correction would be more devastating if airlines’ hadn’t already cut back because of other problems: The 737 Max grounding last year, industrial foul-ups that have delayed Airbus’s narrow-body jets and durability issues that have plagued the three major jet engine manufacturers, said consultant Adam Pilarski, former chief economist for McDonnell Douglas before it merged with Boeing.“If all the airplanes that were ordered that were supposed to be delivered would have come, this bubble would’ve been enormous,” Pilarski said. “But we started deflating it by having incompetent manufacturers. Luckily it’s all of them.”Airline failures?Still, United President Scott Kirby is among those warning there will be more airline failures, particularly outside of the U.S. When carriers shut down, they leave behind fleets of used planes – further crimping demand for new models.“Airlines are desperate to cut capacity, costs and crew, but cannot do it quickly enough,” said Shukor Yusof, founder of aviation consultant Endau Analytics in Malaysia. “There will soon be airlines going out of business.”Others are more optimistic, noting that other outbreaks ended in a matter of months, and pent-up demand for travel will return. Over more than a half century, commercial aviation has weathered so-called “black swan” events where air traffic stalls, only to come back stronger in the end, said John Plueger, CEO of Air Lease Corp., the largest publicly traded US aircraft lessor.“There’s no doubt in my mind that this, too, shall pass,” he said.But with China reeling and globalization waning, the 2020s are likely to be a sobering comedown from the frothy era that followed the 2008 financial crisis.“We’re into a decade of cooling the jets and sticking to the knitting,” Avolon’s Slattery said. “I think it’s a decade of growth, but I don’t think it’s the pace we saw over the last decade.” Boeing Co. and Airbus SE, which until recently couldn’t make planes fast enough to satisfy airlines, are suddenly contending with the opposite risk: churning out jets with no buyers.Demand for new aircraft is drying up as customers wary of the coronavirus shun air travel, ending the longest boom in aviation history. That 16-year surge began as airlines emerged from another infectious disease crisis, the one related to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS. Now the new virus points to leaner times.In less than a month, the tumult has clipped about US$175 billion in market value from the US aerospace industry, a critical source of American exports. And the future looks just as grim. Passenger revenues could drop as much as $113 billion this year if the virus spreads extensively, according to the International Air Transport Association, the largest global airline trade group. Topics :center_img “I personally think it will get worse before it gets better,” said Domhnal Slattery, chief executive officer of Avolon, the third-largest global aircraft leasing company.Boeing and Airbus, which were rolling in cash while airlines went on a $1.15 trillion buying binge stretching back to 2008, are now intently focused on preserving capital and avoiding making “white tails.” That’s the industry term for buyer-less aircraft. Even well heeled carriers such as Delta Air Lines Inc. and United Airlines Holdings Inc., are carefully assessing plans to add new jetliners.Travel restrictions related to the pandemic are preventing airline representatives from China, the biggest international market for new airplanes, from even visiting Boeing’s delivery center in Seattle or Airbus’s in France to test-fly and sign ownership papers for new jets.Other criseslast_img read more


first_img Winning trainer Sandra Hughes said: He’ll get an entry for the RSA (Chase at Cheltenham) and we’ll have a look. “Soft ground is OK but he really wants good.” Always to the fore, Stuart Crawford’s Gilt Shadow had spreadeagled the field long before the last fence under Andrew Lynch, but he got that obstacle all wrong. That allowed Bryan Cooper to drive Apache Jack (10/11 favourite) ahead, the Sandra Hughes-trained gelding running out a very lucky four and a quarter-length winner over Smokey Joe Joe. An agonising last-fence fall by Gilt Shadow gifted the Flower Hill Beginners Chase to Apache Jack at Navan.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more


first_imgINDIANAPOLIS? Michael Flowers would have made a great cornerback.Flowersintercepted a pass intended for Drew Neitzel with 30 seconds left, and hisdriving layup was the difference in No. 8 Wisconsin’s 65-63 victory overMichigan?State on Saturday that sent the Badgers to the Big Ten titlegame. Well, Flowers’ strip and score and a whole bunch of fouls.TheBadgers were able to overcome a rough day offensively thanks in part to theSpartans’ foul trouble. No. 19 Michigan?State was called for 30 fouls andhad four players foul out ? three in one 56-second span alone.“I’mvery disappointed in the outcome,” said Michigan?State coach TomIzzo, who was so upset he had to stop several times to compose himself in hispostgame news conference. “I don’t plan on getting over this today. Idon’t plan on getting over this tomorrow. On Monday I’ll get over it.”TheBadgers, meanwhile, are just happy to keep playing after rallying from 12 downin the second half. They reached the Big Ten tournament championship for asecond straight year, and the fourth time in five years. Wisconsin (28-4) willplay either Illinois or Minnesota, both of which need to win the title to getan NCAA bid.Wisconsinhas now won nine straight, and 22 of 24.“Idon’t think words can really describe what the guys did in the comeback,”Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan said. “Probably the best way to describe it is toput a DVD on, watch it again and make your own observations.”TheSpartans (25-8) certainly have their thoughts about the outcome, but they’renot fit for the public. They were in foul trouble from the start of the game,averaging a foul a minute at one point in the first half. Leading scorer RaymarMorgan, and big men Goran Suton, Drew Naymick and Idong Ibok all fouled out,and Isaiah Dahlman was the only one of the 12 Spartans who played who didn’tget at least one foul.Michigan?Statehad more fouls (14) than field goals (11) in the first half, and Izzo wasforced to cobble together lineups that rarely are seen outside of practice.Despiteall that, Neitzel and freshman Kalin Lucas not only kept the Spartans in thegame, they almost pulled off the victory. Neitzel, who has had an up-and-downyear, had his second big game in a row, leading all scorers with 26. Lucas had18.“For(Neitzel) to play the way he did the last two days, I’ve always said goodthings happen to people who work hard and stick to it,” Izzo said, chokingup. “I think he deserved what he got as far as his play. I don’t think hedeserved what he got as far as the game went.”Neitzelconverted a three-point play, and Lucas sandwiched two jumpers around a freethrow to give Michigan?State a 63-61 lead with two minutes to play. MarcusLandry tied it with a pair of free throws with 1:41 left.Aftera Wisconsin turnover, the Spartans were trying to get the ball in Neitzel’shands. But Flowers, a member of the Big Ten’s all-defensive team, read thefreshman point guard perfectly, stepping in and grabbing Lucas’ pass before itgot anywhere close to Neitzel.“Iknew they were probably looking for Drew Neitzel,” Flowers said. “Ifhe doesn’t have the ball, he can’t score, so I over-covered him.”Flowerstook the ball in for the easy layup, and Wisconsin had a 65-63 lead with 27seconds left.TheSpartans were hoping to get the ball to Neitzel again, but Wisconsin’s stingydefense wasn’t giving them anything. Lucas finally put up a layup, but itrattled off the rim and Brian Butch grabbed the rebound. Michigan?Stategot one more chance after Jason Bohannon missed a pair of free throws andTravis Walton got the rebound, but Neitzel had the 6-foot-11 Butch in front ofhim and his 3-pointer missed bounced off the rim.“Wewere down (12), and we were saying, ‘It’s going to come on the defensiveend,’” Butch said.Butchled the Badgers with 19 points, and Landry had 18. Joe Krabbenhoft had hisfourth double-double of the year with 11 points and 10 rebounds. Wisconsin isnow 11-3 against Michigan?State since Ryan arrived in 2001, including twowins this year.“Rightnow, we’re trying to be the most opportunistic team in the country,” Ryansaid. “We don’t care who gets (the ball) or where, but if we can getwithin 15 feet in, you’ve got a better shot at getting to the free throwline.”Wisconsinwasn’t making its free throws early, and the frequent stops-and-starts seemedto keep the Badgers from getting into any kind of rhythm. Despite Naymick andSuton picking up their third fouls in the first three minutes of the secondhalf, the Spartans opened with a 10-2 run that put them up 39-29 with 15:26 toplay. They would later push the lead to 53-41 on 3-pointers by Neitzel andLucas and a pair of free throws from Morgan.Butthings unraveled in the 56-second span from 6:06 to 5:10 when Ibok, Naymick andSuton all fouled out. The Badgers made six of seven free throws, and Butchadded a 3-pointer to pull Wisconsin to 55-54 with 4:23 to play.last_img read more