first_imgQPR’s Massimo Luongo hit the woodwork twice in the first half of the derby at Griffin Park.Luongo headed Matt Phillips’ left-wing cross against the upright and went close again when his right-footed shot from the near the left-hand edge of the penalty area beat keeper David Button and struck the par post.Earlier, Tjaronn Chery had had a decent chance for the visitors and John Swift went close for Brentford.Chery sneaked behind Bees defender Harlee Dean to collect Daniel Tozser’s pass but the Dutchman’s attempted chip was well off target.On-loan Chelsea youngster Swift then tested Rob Green with a curling effort the Rangers keeper was able to gather.Brentford: Button; Yennaris; Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; McCormack, Diagouraga, Woods, Swift, Judge; Djuricin.Subs: Bonham, Hofmann, Kerschbaumer, Vibe, O’Connell, Gogia, Canos.QPR: Green; Onuoha, Hall, Hill, Konchesky; Henry, Tozser; Phillips, Luongo, Chery; Emmanuel-Thomas.Subs: Smithies, Austin, Doughty, Faurlin, Hoilett, Perch, Polter.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgBritish Foreign Secretary David Miliband And South Africa’s Foreign Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma discussing various issues. Miliband chatting to Deputy Foreign Affairs Minister Sue Van der Merwe. (Pictures: Department of Foreign Affairs) Khanyi MagubaneSouth Africa and the United Kingdom have reinforced their relationship following a recent two-day meeting of the eighth SA-UK Bilateral Forum.Speaking at the conclusion of the visit from her counterpart, British foreign secretary David Miliband, South Africa’s minister of foreign affairs Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said on 8 July she was happy with the wide range of issues covered during the talks.“We have discussed everything from health, sports, trade and industry, migration, climate change, general political issues, science and technology, conflict resolution, economic issues, corporate responsibility and so on,” she said.“On the political front we have discussed both bilateral matters, issues on the African agenda and multilateral issues. Of course, issues on the multilateral agenda, included particularly Sudan and all its facets and the one you are all waiting for – Zimbabwe.”During talks, the two ministers agreed that 2008 was a critical year for development as South Africa was halfway towards achieving its Millennium Development Goals (MDG) — the deadline for which is 2015. The goals are set out by the United Nations and cover issues such as health, education and poverty.The UK is South Africa’s largest trading partner in Europe. The forum for bilateral talks was formed in 2000 with a view to regulate and enhance political and economic relations between South Africa and the UK.During the talks a number of resolutions were made:Climate changeThe ministers stressed the importance of pursuing sustainable, low carbon growth. They acknowledged that current climate change trends would undermine the conditions necessary for economic growth in both the developed and developing worlds, making it extremely difficult to achieve the MDG.They acknowledged that a global transition to a low-carbon economy was both affordable and achievable, and presented many opportunities for developing the environmental sector of the economy. It was stressed that a global climate change agreement was needed, which would support long-term cooperative and domestic action from nations worldwide.ZimbabweDuring the meeting Miliband and Dlamini-Zuma discussed the political crisis in Zimbabwe and both condemned the ongoing violence and intimidation there.The two ministers also noted the decision of the Summit of the African Union on Zimbabwe and the respective governments’ stated positions on that issue. They reaffirmed the importance of dialogue between the Movement for Democratic Change and Zanu-PF to establish a lasting solution that reflects the democratic will of the Zimbabwean people.During his visit, Miliband also delivered a keynote address at the University of South Africa, where he discussed the Zimbabwe issue at length.He acknowledged that Britain may have erred during its colonial rule in Zimbabwe, but that what happened in the past did not stop it from condemning the current situation. “Britain has long and historical links with Zimbabwe. I have never believed that the rights and wrongs of our history should prevent us from speaking clearly and frankly about the situation today,” he said.“[President] Robert Mugabe’s misrule does not invalidate the struggle for independence; our colonial history does not mean we cannot denounce what is wrong.”Miliband noted that free and fair elections were only the basics of a free democracy. He said that President Mugabe’s victory in what had been dubbed the “one man election” defeated the basic fundamentals that govern democracy.He said it was encouraging to see the vast majority of African leaders had spoken out against the pre- and post-election violence in June 2008.HealthSouth Africa’s health minister Dr Manto Tshabalala-Msimang and her UK counterpart, Dawn Primarolo, met to discuss ways in which the two countries would continue working together to share information and expertise on education and training of healthcare professionals.This followed the health ministers renewing a memorandum of understanding that exists between the two countries. The understanding covers a range of healthcare issues, including the ethical recruitment of workers in the sector.“Many countries have learned from our example of ethical recruitment of health workers, and indeed, admire such an effective example of bilateral cooperation,” Tshabalala-Msimang said.South Africa stressed that although Britain was free to recruit South African doctors and nurses, it was important the country was not left stripped of its workforce. The two nations have agreement to work systematically on the issue.The understanding, which was due to expire in October 2008, has been renewed for another five years. More clauses have been included in the agreement, which will explore new areas of health the UK and South Africa could be involved in.Other issues that the two foreign ministers addressed included persisting conflicts on the continent in Abyei, south Sudan, as well as the lack of progress in Darfur. On a positive note, the ministers welcomed the recent signing of the Djibouti Agreement between the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia and the Alliance for the Re-Liberation of Somalia. This was described as an important milestone on the road to a peaceful Somalia.Useful LinksDepartment of Foreign AffairsBritish Foreign and Commonwealth OfficeMillennium Development goals Do you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at [email protected]last_img read more


first_imgEls, who had begun the last day six shots off the pace, played the last nine holes in 32 shots, with four birdies and no drops. The win came as a big surprise, although he had previously done well when The Open Championship had been hosted at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes, finishing tied for second in 1996 and tied for third in 2001. However, his last victory had been in December 2010 in the South African Open. “For some reason I’ve got some belief this week, I feel something special can happen,” Ernie Els said after his third round in The Open Championship at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes. A day later, his words turned prophetic as he captured his fourth major title and his first in a decade. ThanksEls also took the opportunity to thank former President Nelson Mandela for what he has done for South Africa, Johan Rupert for his support of golf in South Africa, and his caddie Ricky Roberts. Four consecutive drops Scott had appeared on course for his first major title despite a hesitant opening, which saw him drop three shots and add a birdie in the first six holes. When he sank another birdie on the 14th, it appeared that he had sealed the deal, but then came those four consecutive drops, including a “how did that happen” miss of a three-footer on the 16th. TurnaroundIt has been quite a turnaround for Els, who missed out on the US Masters earlier this year, having failed to qualify for the event for the first time since 1993. A bogey on the last hole of the US Open meant he failed to qualify for the 2013 Masters. Now, with the South African a major winner again, that concern is a thing of the past. South Africa’s Thomas Aiken tied for seventh after finishing on one-under-par 279 after rounds of 68, 68, 71 and 72. Then, addressing his family, Els continued with a smile: “I’m going to try and come and see you this evening [in London]. I’m supposed to go to Canada, but I think I’m going to blow that thing off … I’ll maybe get to Canada on Tuesday,” a comment which once more had the crowd laughing. After three days of forgiving conditions at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes, the course turned tough on Sunday and Els handled that pressure best to come from behind to take victory as the third round leader Adam Scott’s game fell apart on the inward nine. If one looked closely, though, the signs were there that the man known as “The Big Easy” was on the way back. In the previous major, he returned the best putting statistics in the US Open at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, where he finished ninth, three shots behind the winner, Webb Simpson. Els was gracious in his acceptance speech and addressed runner-up Scott first. “I feel for my buddy Adam Scott,” he said on the 18th green.center_img ‘You’re going to win many of these’“Scotty, you’re a great player, a great friend of mine, we’ve had some great battles in the past. I feel very fortunate and you’re going to win many of these, you’ve got too much talent [not to].” 23 July 2012 “I’m pretty disappointed because I had it in my hands with four to go and I managed to hit a poor shot on each of the closing four holes, which costs you a bogey, and that’s what happens on a course like this. I’m very disappointed, but I played so beautifully for most of the week, I certainly shouldn’t let this bring me down,” he said afterwards in a television interview. He closed with a two-under-par 68, the best round among the third round front-runners, while Scott, who led by four shots after three rounds, following a course record six-under-par 64, a 67 and a 68, fell apart with bogeys on each of the last four holes to stumble to a 75. He recalled talking to Sheryl Calder, known as “the Eye Doctor”, who has helped him with his putting, early in the year. “When I saw her in January,” Els recounted, “she said we were going to win a major this year and I thought she was crazy and here we are right now.” Tiger Woods finished in a tie for third with Brandt Snedeker, four shots behind Els on three-under-par 277. Woods’ challenge for a 15th major, but his first since the 2008 US Open, was undone by a seven on the par-four sixth hole. Louis Oosthuizen, the Open champion in 2010, closed with a 73 to end in a tie for 19th place on one-over 281. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Later, he joked: “I had a lot of support this week, but you guys have to ask yourselves, were you being nice to me or did you believe I could win,” which drew loud laughter from the big crowd.last_img read more


first_imgTV presenter Penny Lebyane speaks candidly about her post-natal depression in the short documentary Let’s Talk A group of health professionals pose for a picture during a workshop that was part of Sadag’s rural outreach programme on mental illness. One of many promotional pictures used by Sadag to drive the message home. A group of women in the KwaZulu-Natal area of Verulam attend a workshop on forming support groups in rural communities across South Africa.(Images: Sadag) MEDIA CONTACTS • Brigitte Taim Lange Strategic Communications +27 2 442 3083 RELATED ARTICLES • Boosting mental health reportage • Celebrities on sale for charity • Research says rooibos tea beats stress • Healthcare in South Africa Valencia TalanePeople with mental illnesses owe it to themselves to respond to the challenges of their conditions by seeking help and treatment to regain control of their lives. To achieve this, they must first be aware of their condition and what treatment is available to manage it.A social media campaign called ‘Let’s Talk Mental Health Awareness’ has been running since August in South Africa and aims to remove the stigma attached to mental illnesses.The situation, organisers believe, can improve if those who live with mental conditions talk about their struggles, cast off the associated shame, and encourage others to come forward to receive help from trained professionals.The project is a joint effort between the South African Depression and Anxiety Group (Sadag) and Pharma Dynamics, a company that provides generic medication for depression and anxiety.Embracing mental illnessThe initiative puts faces of well-known media personalities to different mental conditions that are familiar to a large number of South Africans. A short film, titled Let’s Talk, was produced as part of the campaign and made available on YouTube to reach large numbers. The release coincided with World Mental Health Day, which is celebrated on 10 October and is recognised by the World Health Organisation.Veteran actress Lilian Dube likens her experience a few years back to a feeling of being in a bottomless pit, even when around lots of people. She suffered from depression for many years without knowing what it was or how she could get help.Dube, along with others like television presenter Penny Lebyane and former Mr South Africa and now presenter of his own medical programme, Dr Michael Mol, talk candidly about their struggles with mental illnesses.“If you form a support group then you know you’re not alone,” Dube suggests. “The feeling of thinking you’re alone in your journey is the most terrible.” A leader of one such support group, Driekie Moutinho, agrees and says people with mental illnesses have to take a proactive approach to managing them.Psychiatrist Ian Westmore touches on the element of trust and says that people with mental Illnesses should understand that doctors have not only a good understanding of brain diseases, but know how to effectively treat most of them.“Mental illness is not a death sentence,” says Dr Gerhard Glober. “People with mental illness can have full, productive lives provided they recognise their needs.”Policy changes neededAs is the case with other health services in South Africa, there are disparities between treatment facilities for mental illnesses for urban and rural communities.People in urban areas have access to built-up facilities, healthcare professionals and treatment in abundance, while this is not the case for sufferers in rural areas.A concern among professionals in the mental health industry is that it is this population of patients, who live far away from ever-advancing facilities, who are more vulnerable because many lack awareness.A change in the overall health strategy of the country is needed, asserts psychiatrist Franco Colin.“The focus, from the national government’s perspective, is on tuberculosis, HIV, infant mortality, maternal health and violence-related trauma,” he said. “And psychology touches on each and every one of those areas.”Westmore agrees: “We get so little of the health budgets, while the private sector provides plans that do not cover mental health sufficiently.” His view is that there needs to be equity as far as mental conditions are concerned.Chilling factsResearch by Sadag reveals that one in five South Africans suffers from mental illness, while two in 100 children could be depressed. Experts worry that socio-economic factors like poverty and inequality as well as trauma and violence, which could in turn lead to substance abuse, continue to add to the pressure faced by the nation.Cassey Chambers, director of operations at Sadag, notes that mental illness is a big problem not only in South Africa, but most developing countries worldwide. All the more reason why, she says, campaigns like Let’s Talk should receive as much support as possible.“It’s not only sufferers who should be targeted, but also those who provide care for them.”Between 35% and 41% of pregnant or new mothers are victims of depression.As many as 23 people take their lives, and another 230 attempt to do so, in South Africa every day. The threat, many of the experts interviewed for Let’s Talk agree, lies in conditions being ignored or misunderstood for long periods of time.Television and film actress Bonnie Henna, who has appeared in international productions like Catch a Fire and Hotel Rwanda, recently revealed her struggles with clinical depression in an autobiography titled Eyebags and Dimples.Henna says in the book that for many years she lived with clinical depression and did not know it. Her father was murdered when she was only five years old and throughout her childhood and early adulthood her relationship with her mother, who later also discovered she had depression, was very strained.“Let’s Talk is certainly South Africa’s most ambitious mental health programme yet,” says Mariska Fouche, public affairs manager for Pharma Dynamics, adding that thousands of people have visited the campaign website since its launch.The campaign attracted many testimonials from teenagers to members of the elderly community, who said they were lonely and felt alienated. These were their biggest obstacles to fighting the conditions they live with, most commonly depression and anxiety.“We’ve invested a lot in the campaign,” says Fouche, “and we hope the film will start a large social media movement and help change attitudes and taboos that still exist around mental illness.”last_img read more


first_imgDidi Sydown in a dance scene from Johann Strauss’ opera Die Fledermaus. Gerald Samaai, principal tenor for the Eoan Group, during a rehearsal at the Cape Town City Hall. May Abrahamse singing the role of Rosalinde in Eoan’s 1962 production of Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus.(Images: Cloete Breytenbach)MEDIA CONTACTS• Dr Hilde RoosEoan book project co-ordinator+27 21 808 2597Wilma den HartighA new book has been published to celebrate the 80th birthday of the Eoan Group, South Africa’s first grassroots amateur opera, ballet and drama organisation.Eoan – Our Story is the first book to tell the story of the relatively unknown group, which was established in 1933 by British immigrant Helen Southern-Holt, as a cultural and charity organisation in the former inner-city suburb of District Six in Cape Town.The publication is a project of the Documentation Centre for Music (Domus) at Stellenbosch University (SU). It was compiled by the Eoan History Project, with Dr Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller as editors.The Eoan Group played an important role in promoting the performance of classical music in South Africa, developing artistic talent and preserving the vibrant cultural heritage of District Six.This historic area is known for the forced removal of about 60 000 of its residents during the 1970s by the apartheid regime.The name Eoan comes from the Greek word ‘Eos’, the goddess of the dawn. In Greek mythology she is personified as the one who brings the hope of a new day. The group’s founder chose this name as it referred to her desire to bring hope and new opportunities to the community of District Six.Despite working under the constraints of apartheid, the organisation provided a platform where gifted actors, musicians and dancers could express their life’s calling.“Their story is inspirational. It is time to celebrate their memory,” says Roos.For many people who had talent, this was their only chance.“This is why the organisation was so important,” she says. “It gave people an opportunity to develop their talent and perform, even if these were limited opportunities.“There is no other group like this.”Important memories preserved in printThrough the book the Eoan History Project hopes to preserve the organisation’s history for future generations.The publication tells the story of Eoan’s establishment, but also shows the impact of the apartheid government’s racial policies on South African communities.“What is extraordinary about this group is that there is just about no other example in the country where the evolution of a cultural group and the development of the apartheid regime are so closely linked,” Roos says.When the Eoan Group started, their headquarters were situated in District Six and 15 branches were established throughout the Cape Peninsula by the mid-1950s. They offered a wide range of activities that included ballet, folk dance, speech, drama, singing, painting and sewing.After the destruction of District Six, the group moved to their new premises, the Joseph Stone Theatre in Athlone.Years later, documents and photos of Eoan’s productions were found at the theatre. The photos, permits for performances, letters and programmes were organised into an archive which has been housed at the SU Music Department since 2008.Roos says many stories about the group and its members were undocumented for years, and numerous oral accounts of their activities appear in this book for the first time.The book is an oral history and includes extracts from 47 interviews which have been structured in a narrative around themes such as opera and ballet productions, and is complemented by photos and other archive material.The interviews were done mainly with former Eoan members, most of which sang in the group’s opera productions.A bittersweet storyDuring the 1950s, Eoan performed to mixed audiences. But Roos says the group’s activities became more restricted as apartheid intensified in the 1960s.“It had a major impact on their performances, but they kept going amid the political difficulties,” she says.Eventually apartheid legislation completely prohibited mixed audiences. To comply with these requirements, the group applied for permits to perform in the City Hall for mixed audiences from 1966 onwards.Roos says the group suffered a setback when they were forced to accept financial support from the apartheid government’s coloured affairs department, which caused their standing and support in the community to suffer.“They were forced into a tricky compromise,” she says. “They needed funding to put on performances but they also didn’t want to betray their community.”Despite these conditions, they remained successful and popular, and this was widely reflected in ticket sales and media coverage.Outstanding performances, against all oddsDuring their artistic peak from the 1950s to 1970s, the group often performed to packed houses in Cape Town’s best concert halls.Eoan performed the first full-length indigenous jazz ballet by a local composer for a South African ballet group. The Square by Stanley Glasser was about gang life in District Six.From 1956 until the late 1970s the group had an active amateur opera section which performed at arts festivals and annual opera seasons and toured throughout South Africa (1960 and 1965) and the United Kingdom (1975).In 1956 they performed Verdi’s La Traviata in the Cape Town City Hall, Eoan’s artistic home before apartheid legislation forced them to move to Athlone.By 1977 they had eleven operas in their repertoire: three by Verdi, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and La Bohème, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Bizet’s Carmen, Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci and Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana.Making a name overseasSome of Eoan’s members went on to build successful international careers.“Many of them went abroad, got bursaries and took their chance at better opportunities,” Roos says. “Some big names emerged from the group.”They were mostly dancers, but a handful of singers also made it overseas, despite not having access to good vocal training in South Africa.One of the group’s success stories is Vincent Hantam. According to Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, Hantam danced most of the principal roles with Scottish Ballet from 1975 to 1991, and has performed with many companies on the local and international stage.Tenor Joseph Gabriels was discovered by Joseph Manca, musical director of the Eoan Group.“He had an exceptional voice,” Roos says.He received no musical or vocal training while in South Africa, but in 1967 he secured a bursary from the Schneier family of Johannesburg to study in Milan.In 1969 he won the famous Verdi competition in Busseto. He made his debut in 1971 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Canio in I Pagliacci – the first South African to sing there.The Eoan Group stopped performing operas in 1977, but the company still exists today and they focus on dance productions.According to the team who compiled the book, the interviews with former Eoan members show how much people invested into the arts through the group, the extraordinary circumstances in which they had to operate, and the influential role that the group played in so many lives.last_img read more


first_img Barbados Prime Minister speaks to country ahead of Tropical Storm Dorian; said country is preparing for 6-12 feet storm surge Related Items:barbados, butch stewart, scandals resort international Multi-millionaire Barbados businessmen arrested in $3m drug bust, yacht suspected in drug trafficking Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 20 Jul 2015 – Butch Stewart, Chairman of Sandals Resorts International is leading a media fam-trip and tour of his ‘luxury included’ properties in the Eastern Caribbean. With a flight from Provo to Barbados; Barbados to Grenada and then Grenada to St. Lucia local media and hotel professionals are invited on the trip which will showcase recently purchased and renovated escapes under the Sandals brand and some of the destinations within which they are nestled. Magnetic Media is among those tagging along… look for our photos, listen for our radio reports or catch our TV news stories – online, right here on News Break or One Caribbean Television. We’re also on Facebook, tweeting at Twitter, posting on Instagram, linking you to the latest news stories on LinkedIn and at our YouTube channel: Magnetic MediaTV and even on iTunes. Visit MagneticMediaTV.com and chose your favorite way to stay informed! Recommended for you Stinky sargassum blamed for marine disaster; dolphins, flying fish and turtles trapped Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more


first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, February 2, 2017 – On Wednesday 1st February 2017, in the Grand Turk Supreme Court, Lavardo Smith of Kew Town Providenciales, was sentenced to Life Imprisonment for the 2011 murder of Santa Suarez Ramirez of the Dominican Republic.It was reported on Wednesday 20th July 2011 shortly after 9 pm that a female was shot at the sailing Paradise Restaurant located in Blue Hills. As a result, Police and emergency services responded where the victim, who was the barmaid was later pronounced deceased from a gunshot wound. Investigation reveals that Smith armed with a gun along with two other males, dropped off by a fourth male who was waiting in a getaway car, entered the establishment and while inside Santa Suarez Ramirez was shot and killed.Police later arrested and charged all four males. Two of the men pleaded guilty to their charges and was subsequently sentenced to 4 and seven years respectively for their roles in the incident while Smith and the fourth man maintained their not guilty plea. They both went to a trial in the Supreme Court. In 2013, Smith was charged and found guilty of murder; he was sentenced to life imprisonment, while the fourth man was charged and found guilty of manslaughter and was sentenced to 12 years.  Both men appealed to the Court of Appeal on a misdirection given by the trial judge which was granted. Hence a retrial was set for 2017.The matters are being tried separately, Lavardo Smith was unanimously found guilty yesterday by a 12 member jury.  The fourth male retrial commenced in April 2017.Press Release: RTCIPF#MagneticMediaNews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more