first_imgA recent survey showed that credit unions and their members are looking for different things from their credit cards. In fact, 76% credit union card goals were aimed toward growth, while the rest prioritized member services. But here’s the rub: 100% of members polled listed “false declines” as their number one service issue for credit cards. Clearly, there’s a disconnect between member experience and credit union card goals. Growth is a good end goal but making sure existing cardholders feel taken care of is paramount for retention.  There is nothing more frustrating to a member than a false decline in the middle of a busy day. Why Card Declines are a Problem Speaking from personal experience, I know how frustrating a false decline is. Recently, an old friend came through town. We caught up over drinks and because we were on my home turf, I offered to pick up the tab. My card was declined. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more


first_imgSouth Korean shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries has agreed to pay a $75 million penalty as part of a settlement agreement reached with the U.S. Justice Department over bribery investigation related to a 2007 drillship construction involving Petrobras and drilling contractor Pride.“[Samsung Heavy Industries] has agreed to pay total penalties of more than $75 million to resolve the government’s investigation into violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) arising out of a scheme to pay millions of dollars in bribes to officials in Brazil,” the DOJ said last Friday.“Samsung Heavy Industries paid millions of dollars to a Brazilian intermediary, knowing that some of that money would be used to bribe high-level executives at Petrobras and obtain a lucrative shipbuilding contract,” said Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.U.S. Attorney G. Zachary Terwilliger of the Eastern District of Virginia said that Samsung “caused millions of dollars in corrupt bribe payments to be paid to foreign officials to win business, upsetting what should have been a level playing field for other companies that followed the rules.”According to admissions by Samsung Heavy Industries, as shared by DOJ, beginning in 2007 and continuing until 2013, Samsung provided approximately $20 million in commission payments to a Brazilian intermediary, knowing that portions of the money would be paid as bribes to officials at oil company Petrobras.The bribes paid caused Samsung to secure improper business advantages, as Petrobras then entered into a drillship charter contract with Pride (now part of Valaris) to whom  Samsung Heavy Industries then sold the drillship for this contract.“Samsung Heavy Industries took actions in furtherance of the bribery conspiracy from its branch office located in the United States,” the DOJ said.Samsung and the DOJ also reached a three-year Deferred Prosecution Agreement. Upon successful completion, the DOJ will seek to dismiss the deferred charge, which relates to a drillship known as the “DS-5,” Samsung said. The rig in question, delivered in 2011, is now owned by Valaris, and is stacked without a contract in Spain.Commenting on the DOJ settlement Samsung Heavy CEO Joon Ou Nam said: “We deeply regret the company’s involvement in these events, which is contrary to our values and ethical standards,” “Many of the events described in our agreement happened more than a decade ago, and the individuals involved are no longer with the company. Over the past years, we have taken extensive steps, at our own initiative, to strengthen our anti-corruption compliance program to meet the highest standards of compliance and ethics.”last_img read more


first_img Share Plant Protection Officer, Ryan Anselm has revealed that efforts are currently being made to manage fruit flies on the island. Anselm explained that there has been a decrease in fruit production which is caused by fruit flies, hence the need for this to be addressed with urgency.“Farmers have been experiencing significant decreases in fruit production so the strategy is to maintain the fruit sector for both the local and the export market. Fruit Flies and Mango Seed Weevils have negatively impacted our ability to export fruits. [Our] strategy is to maintain the levels of fruit export by managing the Fruit Fly population”’.Part of the efforts currently being undertaken to deal with this issue is the assistance of a Suriname expert who will visit farms with a view to educating farmers on fruit flies.Alies Van Saeurs–Muller, Head of the Carambola Fruit Fly Programme in Suriname, is part of a two-member delegation that will be visiting farms, meeting with extension officers and the Plant Protection and Quarantine Unit this week.“The message we’re bringing has to do with recognising fruit flies and [educating persons on] what they could do to manage the Fruit Fly problem. There are quite a number of methods that persons could apply in the field, not only the destruction of fruit flies by destroying affected fruit but also biological control, trapping, bait spraying etc.”According to Muller, if the larvae of the fruit flies are not destroyed, they could re-emerge and infect other fruits.“Everybody can do it…Everybody who has fruit trees in their own homes and finds larvae in the fruit can destroy them. If the larvae are left on the ground, they will penetrate the soils and re-emerge as flies and would infest fruits in your garden again or somebody else’s garden”.She also noted that citizens can assist by destroying fruits which are infected and this will go a long way in the management of fruit flies.Dominica is not the only Caribbean country which has been affected by fruit flies; Grenada has also been battling with the pest.Dominica Vibes News LocalNews Efforts being made to manage fruit flies by: – July 18, 2012 Share 31 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Tweetlast_img read more