first_imgLoad remaining images Wilco played their fourth night at the Beacon Theatre on Wednesday night with a 29-song setlist. Pulling songs from their 2016 Schmilco, the Chicago crew used the opportunity to play tunes like “Normal American Kids,” “If I Ever Was A Child,” “Cry All Day,” and “We Aren’t the World (Safety Girl),” while keeping their longtime fans happy with career-spanning favorites “Heavy Metal Drummer,” “Passenger Side,” and “A Shot In The Arm.” Overall, their four-night residency was a huge hit in New York City.Photographer Andrew Blackstein was on site to capture the glory in the gallery below.Setlist: Wilco | The Beacon Theatre | New York City | 3/22/17You Are My Face, Normal American Kids, If I Ever Was A Child, Cry All Day, Side With the Seeds, Radio Cure, Kamera, The Joke Explained, Misunderstood, Someone to Lose, At Least That’s What You Said, The Lonely 1, Impossible Germany, We Aren’t the World (Safety Girl), Dawned On Me, Theologians, Via Chicago, Locator, Heavy Metal Drummer, I’m the Man Who Loves You, Hummingbird, The Late GreatsE: Random Name Generator, Red-Eyed and Blue, I Got You (At the End of the Century), Outtasite (Outta Mind), Spiders (Kidsmoke)E2: Passenger Side, A Shot In The Armlast_img read more


first_imgAs usual, just before kickoff, the Notre Dame marching band played the national anthem at the start of Saturday night’s football game against Florida State. This time, however, as most of the crowd stood with their hands over their hearts, part of the student section refused to rise.Instead, as the marching band began their performance of the national anthem, at least 60 students at the front of the junior student section knelt to show solidarity with victims of police violence and to protest racial profiling of African Americans. ANDREW CAMERON | The Observer At least 60 students kneel during the national anthem at the Notre Dame-Florida State football game Saturday night. The move was intended to signal solidarity with victims of police violence and to protest racial profiling.The organizers of the protest, juniors Mary Katherine Hieatt, Durrell Jackson, Shawn Wu, Nicholas Ottone (Editor’s Note: Nicholas Ottone is a Scene writer for The Observer) and Brian Gatter, claimed to be continuing the movement started by ex-NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who sparked controversy when, beginning in 2016, he sat, and in later games knelt, during the national anthem played before his games.“We’re doing a protest,” Jackson said. “It’s known as the national anthem protest, but we’re not really protesting the national anthem. We’re taking a stand against social injustice and police brutality. The movement was started by Colin Kaepernick.”The idea for the protest began when Wu noticed Jackson and other African-American friends of his sitting during the anthem at an earlier game in the season, Wu said. Taking inspiration from his participation in the ‘Realities of Race’ seminar he took last spring, Wu contacted Jackson. Together with Hieatt and fellow seminar participants Gatter and Ottone, the group decided to gauge interest by making a Facebook event. On the evening of Nov. 4, the five organizers created the private Facebook event “FSU Game Kneeling in Solidarity.”“The decision that this was going to happen was contingent on how much support it had on the Facebook page,” Ottone said. “We realized the effectiveness of any kind of display would really depend on how much of a response we could get. Really, that turning point was Tuesday or Wednesday.”The event description instructed participants to enter the stadium as soon as the gates opened, to fill the front of the junior student section and to kneel, holding hands with neighbors and crossing arms for the duration of the anthem. The description of the event on Facebook included that the goal of the protest was “[t]o visibly kneel in solidarity with victims of systemic racial injustice.”Several of the organizers expressed dissatisfaction with student complacency and unwillingness to make political demonstrations on campus. Wu said part of the effectiveness of the form of the protest was its visibility.“Oftentimes we can have these events that talk about race or diversity, or that challenge them, and oftentimes these events don’t reach people or people don’t go outside of their way to put themselves into these spaces,” Wu said. “I think one of the special things about this protest is that everyone sees it and everyone is going to consider it.”Since Kaepernick’s kneeling began making national headlines in 2016, kneeling during the anthem as a form of protest has been widely criticized, including by former Notre Dame football head coach Lou Holtz, who said kneeling players were “hurting the sport.” Asked how he would respond to criticisms that kneeling showed disrespect for the flag and for the military, Jackson said the protest was in line with American values.“The troops fight for our right to protest, and that’s what we’re doing,” he said. “I respect the troops and everyone here in this stand respects the troops because we know they’re fighting for us. They’re not just fighting for our country to be protected, they’re fighting for our country to be better. It’s the part of the people who are here, who are not risking their lives every day, to fight for what’s better.”Some students in the student section did not see or notice the demonstration, among them senior Matthew Piwko.“I truly didn’t notice at all,” Piwko said. “I wasn’t paying very close attention but it wasn’t very obvious on the whole, even for someone who was looking for it.“I think people can express their opinion any way they want. I don’t necessarily agree with it but it’s their right to kneel if they want to.”Junior Loyal Murphy entered the student section early and stood near the kneeling students but did not participate. He said he saw the demonstration, but did not think it was very noticeable.“When people are thinking about the Florida State game, they’re not thinking about the protest,” he said. “It didn’t make a big impact in my life. I didn’t really care. I was just like ‘Oh cool, well at least if they think they’re doing something, I guess that’s a good thing.’“You could tell it was a section that went down on one knee, but I think it was too small and I don’t feel like it had any true impact to the game or to the issues in general.”Junior Gregory Wall, who participated in the protest, described the demonstration as a success.“I think on such short notice, it was successful, especially being able to convince 80 people to come an hour and 45 minutes early when it’s 35 degrees out and almost snowing and on the last game of the season, when everyone’s tailgating and everyone’s enjoying themselves, to be willing to go out and fight for what you believe in,” he said.Tags: Colin Kaepernick, Kneeling, national anthem, police brutality, protest, racial injusticelast_img read more


first_imgAsset managers hold the key to ensuring pension schemes get value for money from the market, according to Chris Hitchen, chief executive at RPMI, although other panellists at the PLSA investment conference in Edinburgh said all agents – including trustees – had a role to play.The headline theme for the panel was the Financial Conduct Authority’s asset management market study, which the FCA launched in November last year, and whether the market was working for pension schemes.Tracey McDermott, interim chief executive at the FCA, said asset management was “one of the UK’s success stories”.But she said there was “no room for complacency” and that, as new regulations drove more consumers to engage with asset managers, it was of “enormous consequence that they receive maximum bang for their buck”. The market study is “a serious and wide-ranging exercise”, she said.The FCA’s next steps include a survey of institutional investors to get a picture of how purchasers of asset management services view the market, and “a comprehensive programme” of international comparison work, McDermott told delegates.Her overview set the scene for a panel discussion during which market participants passed around to different players the responsibility for ensuring that end investors get value for money.RPMI’s Hitchen said transparency was helpful but that it was not enough.He said asset managers were “the part of the investment chain that we are looking to to really help us get the best deal”, not least because they have the most resources out of investment consultants and end investors.“Fund managers are where the resources are, where the pools of assets are,” he said.“And most trustees in the room are probably looking to their asset managers to be their guardians in the market.”He highlighted problems in the asset management industry such as closet indexing and “a lot of competition using alpha”, but he also pointed to investors’ “atomised portfolios” as a shortcoming – “we’re all massively over-diversified”.Pension schemes can take steps themselves, too, noted Hitchen, pointing to Railpen’s having simplified its external manager arrangements and hired a full-time member of staff to monitor fees.The latter was a decision taken after a “forensic look” at its fees revealed the scheme was paying four times more than it thought it was.BlackRock’s Stephens accepted that asset managers were part of the solution, but he emphasised the need to differentiate between costs and value for money, and also passed responsibility to other market participants, including trustees.Trustees make some of the most important decisions that will affect costs and value for money, he said, with asset allocation by far the most important thing to get right.“Are trustees spending as much time on asset-allocation decisions as they are on manager selection?” he asked.“How thoroughly, how consistently, how frequently are trustees evaluating their advisers and the advice they are given? How easy do we providers make it for our clients to assess us?”Three conditions need to be met for there to be effective competition, which is good for trustees, he said.First, there needs to be choice, and second, those choices need to be differentiated.Third, “and the one I think is less often spoken about, is the willingness of clients to choose, to make change”.Inertia, said Stephens, was “one of the things that has got us into the situation we’re in”.That situation, according to Stephens, is one where “the average hedge ratio is 40%, where most pension schemes are able to liquidate huge swathes of their portfolio within a week or a month, thereby ignoring attractive illiquidity premia, where adviser appointments seem if not permanent then extremely long term, and where clients extend advisory mandates into asset management mandates without open tender.”A consultant’s view came from Robert Brown, chairman of the global investment committee at Willis Towers Watson, who said progress was needed in several areas, not just on costs, and that it was “incumbent” on every bit of the chain to pursue improvement.With returns low and risks high, investors “have to pull every lever available to them” to increase returns, he said.As to the structure of the industry, “the decision chain is full of agents”, all of whom are subject to potential conflicts of interest, and this needs to be managed, he added.Costs, meanwhile, are increasingly accepted as being too high despite the market’s being competitive, noted Brown, with this down to structural factors such as information being asymmetric and buyers of asset management services being quite fragmented, and therefore weak buyers.Aggregation, as has happened in Australia, could be a way of dealing with the latter problem, he said.Innovation, another area to consider, has brought some good and some bad changes, said Brown, although the associated rise in complexity of investment products has typically meant higher fee levels.Finally, according to Brown, the “relentless” increase in competition for resources, returns and talent, not to mention complexity, has driven the need for greater governance and more management resources to deal with this.“Now, more than ever, we need to make progress in all of these areas,” he said.last_img read more


first_imgAfter losing their last five games in the Big Ten season, a break from the grueling conference schedule may be just what the Wisconsin women’s basketball team needs to get back on track.For the last non-conference game of the year, the Badgers will play host to the Panthers of Eastern Illinois Monday in the Kohl Center at 7 p.m.Eastern Illinois enters the game with a record of 8-10 overall and is coming off a 15-point win over Tennessee State Saturday. The Panthers played a difficult non-conference schedule and lost their first six games of the year.But since then they are 8-4, including 7-4 in the Ohio Valley Conference, and are just a game and a half out of first place in the conference.Eastern Illinois is led by a pair of Megans. Senior guard Megan Sparks averages 15.8 points and three rebounds a game; 5-foot-7 freshman Megan Edwards has scored in double figures in eight straight games and has been named the conference freshman of the week three weeks running. She also leads the team in assists with 3.3 per contest and had a career high eight in Saturday’s win over Tennessee State.The Badgers may benefit from their size advantage over Eastern Illinois, as the tallest player the Panthers can put on the court is 6-foot-2 while Wisconsin can put two forwards on the court that are both listed at 6-foot-4.This Wisconsin team has been hampered by injuries and is looking to get healthy with multiple starters out of the lineup.Senior forward Annie Nelson has been playing very few minutes since her right shoulder injury, and sophomore point guard Janese Banks has not played since early January. Banks, the second-leading scorer on the team, has been out with a left foot injury.”Without a true point guard out there right [now], we’re trying to run hits to get it to Jolene (Anderson) and kicks to Ashley (Josephson),” UW head coach Lisa Stone said. “Hopefully, we get Janese (Banks) back soon. We hope to hear more positive news. Hopefully she can start practice on Saturday or Sunday and get her out here on Monday night.”Replacing them in the starting lineup has been guard Shari’ Welton and center Caitlin Gibson.Gibson, a true freshman from Jefferson, Wis., is averaging 17 minutes a game while getting used to the physical play of the Big Ten.Welton has just five career starts under her belt but has played admirably filling in, averaging five points and an assist in her last five games.”Players have stepped up and Shari’ has done a great job for us,” Stone said. “They’re all stepping up to the challenge and they are not afraid of anybody and I’m proud of our kids.”The Badgers will also be without the services of backup guard Akiya Alexander, who was declared academically ineligible for the second semester.The Badgers have really relied a lot on Anderson, a preseason all-Big Ten selection, to carry the load. The sophomore has responded by leading the team in scoring eight out of the last ten games. She also has five double-doubles on the year while leading the team in scoring (17.4) and rebounding (7.1).Wisconsin will need Anderson and company to have a big day to end their current five-game skid.”Right now we’re mentally drained,” Stone said. “You have to regain some confidence and a mental edge.”A win Monday will definitely go a long way to helping the Badgers get some much-needed confidence for the stretch run of their conference season.last_img read more