first_imgHundreds of Cambridge and Allston-Brighton residents didn’t let Saturday’s weather dampen their spirits as they watched Harvard beat Cornell 24-7 as part of Community Football Day. The annual event, now closing in on 25 years, offered not only free admission to the stadium, but lunch, raffles, face painting, and more.“You could say it’s a tradition,” said Renal Jean, assistant coach of the Bengals at Brighton High School, who brought about 20 of his varsity high school players to see the game. “I played for Brighton High myself, and my coach brought us every year, so I felt it was important to continue that tradition,” he said. “We bring the team to a Harvard game every year. Harvard does a lot to support us, so we feel like it’s important that we come out to support them.”Before heading out into damp conditions, families gathered at the nearby community tent, which offered children’s activities, free hot dogs, and drinks. Members of the Harvard Dance Team were on hand, doing face painting and temporary tattoos for the kids.“We’re hoping they brave the rain for some fun,” said dance team member Halie LeSavage ’17.Selena Li ’15, co-captain of the team, said volunteering at events like Community Football Day is crucial to establish a strong sense of community.“That’s one of our goals as the dance team, to volunteer at events around Harvard and MIT and really build spirit for Harvard,” she said.Stepping out of the rain, Alana Fisher cradled her 10-month-old son, Isaac, while her other son, 4-year-old Toby, colored in a drawing of a football player nearby.“We thought we’d come check it out,” said Fisher. “My husband and I are from Australia, and we’d never seen a football game, so we wanted to see what it was all about.”Pierre Villard, a Cambridge resident and visiting scholar in materials science and mechanical engineering at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and his wife were curious as well.“We thought it was a good opportunity to see a game — this will be our first one,” he said, smiling.“Community Football Day is a terrific way for Harvard to give back to our friends and neighbors, and for us all to enjoy a great game while we we’re at it,” said Kevin Casey, associate vice president for Harvard Public Affairs and Communications. “We were so glad to see so many folks come out, and we know the players and coaches who work so hard are inspired by the community support.”Brighton High coach Jean added that coming to the game was a good way for his players to decide if they wanted to play at the college level.“When they watch the game here at Harvard, they see what’s involved — how it’s at a whole other level,” he said. “It gives them a sense of what’s expected, and whether it’s something they want to pursue for themselves in the future.”Despite the gloomy outset, Harvard not only beat Cornell, but Harvard Athletics partnered with the Allston-Brighton Food Pantry to hold a canned food drive during the game. A win-win for all.last_img read more


first_imgThis semester, more travel options are available for students looking for a ride. Following a pilot program last year, Uber is now officially allowed on campus, according to Notre Dame Security Police chief Keri Kei Shibata.Previously, Uber drivers could only pick up students at public access points, like main circle and library circle. Now, they are treated the same as cab drivers and allowed to go directly to student dorms and other locations on campus to pick up students.Shibata said the newness of Uber as a service for students was a red flag for the administration, so they wanted to take a close look at it before fully approving it. After the success of pilot program during the spring semester of 2016, Shibata said Uber proved it should be treated the same as cabs.“It’s just a new program, and we weren’t sure what the impact might be,” she said. “And so we allowed them to come on campus and closely monitored to make sure there weren’t any problems.”The rationale for slowly introducing Uber was more about practical than safety concerns, Shibata said.“It was partially for security and partially because space is limited on campus, and we weren’t sure how large the demand would be,” she said.Shibata said the University allows all cabs licensed by the city of South Bend to access campus and pick up passengers.“If there were any companies we had continuing problems with, we would restrict their access,” she said. “But so far, there haven’t been any.”The rise of Uber has led to some students taking on roles as drivers. Off-campus junior David Connelly said he started driving for Uber after an upperclassmen recommended he try it.“I just drive whenever I’m not too busy, and it’s a good way to make money for study abroad,” he said.While Uber has increased in popularity, Shibata said cabs still remain the most frequent choice for students and can sometimes lead to safety issues because they often cram in more students than they have seats for.“There are some forms of vehicles that are exempt from having a seat belt in every position,” she said.“But regardless, it’s not safe for there to be more passengers than there are seats.”While this practice is not illegal under Indiana State law — which exempts cabs from seat belt requirements, along with other public transportations like buses — Shibata said NDSP wants to discourage this potentially dangerous practice. Because Notre Dame is private property and NDSP is a private police force, cabs can be pulled over and targeted for overcrowding when on Notre Dame’s campus.“When they’re on campus, we have the ability to say that’s not acceptable,” she said.Tags: Cabs, NDSP, transportation, Uberlast_img read more


first_imgThe relentless pace of regulatory change is the new normal.by: Bill KlewinI’ve been writing about lending, operations, and regulatory compliance for Credit Union Magazine for almost 20 years. This is my last column. I am retiring.Over the last 20 years, you’ve learned a little about my family, my views—and hopefully a few things you’ve been able to use in serving your members.I will miss your comments, your camaraderie, and your passion about what we do. I will miss being told I am contributing to the downfall of Western civilization (I am all-powerful, apparently), and I will miss the feeling of satisfaction when I have helped someone at a credit union solve a particularly troublesome problem.With that said, I have one last chance to bring out my crystal ball and look ahead to the regulatory challenges you will face in lending in 2015 and beyond. There is really only one theme: the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has only begun to affect your business.Here are just a few of the issues you will face: continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


first_img“The reason why it’s helpful to have a test in your home state is because there are follow-ups, especially if you do test positive,” said Epstein. “So, it’s the county you live in that makes the arrangements for whether or not you need to be isolated or other information they need to collect.” New York State Department of Transportation Deputy Commissioner, Ron Epstein, says some people may feel discouraged because of rumors that the test is an uncomfortable process, or simply because restrictions are easing up, people don’t feel the need to get tested. He says he personally took the test at the site and says the people working there do a good job to make you feel comfortable. VESTAL (WBNG) — Officials at BU’s drive-thru testing site say over the past couple of weeks, they’ve ramped up testing by thousands and say there are still spots open for appointments. The testing site opened at the end of April and already, officials leading the center say they are conducting up to 200 tests a day, but are encouraging even more people with symptoms to get tested there. Epstein specified, if you are not a New York resident, but you are a New York employee, especially at places like nursing home facilities, you will not be turned away from the testing site. However, he does say they prefer to test New Yorkers, so they can track the number of cases easier in the counties.center_img RELATED: Binghamton University to be COVID-19 drive-thru testing site “There is no reason to let our guard down,” said Epstein. “We want to ensure that the region continues to prosper and therefore partners civic duty to get tested if you have symptoms, so the region can reopen.” In order to make an appointment, you can call the NYSDOH at 888-364-3065 and the workers there will help set it up. You will then be asked to have all your personal ID information for the medical workers on site before you are tested.last_img read more


first_img By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary BLOG: How DOC is Helping Inmates with Mental Illness Transition Home (Round-up) Criminal Justice Reform,  Round-Up,  The Blog Yesterday, Department of Corrections officials highlighted a state-run, first-of-its-kind unit at the Wernersville Community Corrections Center that helps individuals with mental illness transition home following incarceration. At the media event, reporters were given a tour of the 32-bed unit and interviewed employees and center residents.“We are proud of our efforts to address the behavioral health needs of those who are incarcerated in Pennsylvania,” said Corrections Secretary John Wetzel. “With fully one-quarter of all of those entering prisons in Pennsylvania diagnosed with mental illness and nine percent of those struggling with serious mental illness, it is imperative that the department develop the best possible programming to help them succeed when they return to the community. We anticipate that Pathways Transitional Wellness Center will become a model facility for other states.”Take a look at the additional coverage below: May 18, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Philadelphia Inquirer: Helping mentally ill inmates find their way home“When Henry Hamm, a 61-year-old Lancaster man who has schizophrenia, finished serving time for writing a bad check, he was sent to a new program designed to help offenders with serious mental illnesses rejoin the outside world. He joined Pathways Transitional Wellness Center, which connects mentally ill parolees to social and medical services, housing, and jobs before they try to make it on their own. Three months later, he’s a fan of the nine-month-old Department of Corrections program, which is housed in a boxy, utilitarian building on the grounds of Wernersville State Hospital, about nine miles southwest of Reading.”Allentown Morning Call: State touts reentry program for seriously mentally ill inmates“As a state prison inmate with serious mental illness, 61-year-old Henry Hamm represents one of the biggest challenges that Pennsylvania’s corrections system faces. Hamm, who is serving a 2- to 4-year sentence in Lancaster County for felony theft, is diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Too often, the extra hurdles he faces would make his time as a prisoner a difficult one, and one in which he risked returning to the streets no better able to cope with his problems than when he left. Enter a first-of-its-kind program at a halfway house run by the Department of Corrections on the campus of Wernersville State Hospital, roughly 10 miles west of Reading.”Reading Eagle: State corrections secretary celebrates success at Wernersville center“Mentally ill Americans are disproportionately more likely to be arrested, incarcerated and commit another crime once released. This problem extends to the state level. Pennsylvania Department of Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said about 27 percent of all inmates in the system have a mental illness and about 9 percent of those are battling severe disorders. So to address the needs of this unique population the department launched a new program solely dedicated to helping those offenders return to the community after they have served their time.”Follow the Department of Corrections on Twitter @CorrectionsPA and on Facebook. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more


first_imgMountain climber Ross Miller in action.RESPECTED Brisbane mountain climber Annette Miller sold her family home at auction on Saturday, nine years after losing her husband in a mountain climbing tragedy at Mt Lindesay on the Queensland/New South Wales border.25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi.Mrs Miller was the first woman to climb Mt Tinbeerwah near Noosa on the Sunshine Coast and her husband Ross Miller was a professional rock climber with more than 20 years’ experience.Annette Miller at the auction of her Tarragindi home of 25 years.“Mountain climbing is about being out in nature, you forget everything except that square metre of rock in front of you and above you and it’s the challenge of whether you can ‘work the rock’,” Mrs Miller said.“And to do it with someone, like a soulmate or even a good friend, it’s an amazing experience because you’re both dependent on each other and your life is quite literally in the other person’s hands, there’s a lot of trust involved.”25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi is also 46 O’Neil Street, Moorooka as it has a two-street frontage and is positioned at the boundary of two suburbs.Their four-bedroom, architect-designed home at 25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi is on a 45 degree slope next to Toohey Forest Park and is packed with memories from a lifetime of hiking and climbing together.“It’s taken me a long time to get to this point where I felt I could let go of the house,” Mrs Miller said. “Ross and I pretty much had our whole relationship here … he did all the gardening and he also built the rock climbing wall downstairs,” she said.Great views from the deck.Place Graceville agent Karen Simons took the 1980s-built, three-level home to auction with two active bidders but a vendor bid of $850,000 was needed to break the ice.Architect Leon Burton raised the bid to $900,000 and after a short volley of bids the house sold to Mr Burton for $1.075m.“There’s not that classic street appeal but internally, it’s like a chalet,” Mr Burton said of the 1499sq m property.Built like a Swiss Chalet.“We’re not quite as adventurous as (Ross Miller) was but we are very active and we love bushwalking and we did notice the rock climbing wall. We might set that up.”More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours agoParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoMrs Miller has continued hiking and will travel to the Scenic Rim on the school holidays to be the Girraween National Park camp host.“You meet and greet campers and give them advice on where to go through the national parks,” she said.Annette and Ross met in 1990 while on a three day hike near Cunningham’s Gap in 1990.Their outdoor interests expanded to include cycling, skiing, rogaining, mountaineering and rock climbing.Their honeymoon in 1996 was a 20-day bushwalk in the spectacular West McDonnell Ranges in the Northern Territory, including the world-famous Larapinta Trail.The Larapinta Trail in Central Australia.FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more


first_imgEscalona was nabbed after he sold asachet of suspected illegal drugs to an undercover cop for P100 around 6:40p.m. on Feb. 19. The 29-year-old resident Mario Escalonayielded the suspected illegal drugs, a police report showed. BACOLOD City – Twelve sachets ofsuspected shabu valued at around P120,000 were seized in a buy-bust operationin Barangay Camugao, Kabankalan City, Negros Occidental.center_img The suspect was detained in the lockupcell of the Kabankalan City police station, facing charges for violation ofRepublic Act 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img read more


first_imgLawrenceburg, In. — Indiana State Police say a local woman was killed in a crash around noon Tuesday on U.S. 50 near Station Hollow Road. A witness alerted troopers to the crash scene after spotting an inverted car down the embankment.Troopers say Cynthia McCool, 50, was westbound on U.S. 50 and drove off the road for an unknown reason. The car rolled down the embankment, ejecting McCool. She was declared deceased at the scene.Investigators speculate the crash happened between 8 a.m. and noon, saying the car was very difficult to see from the roadway.last_img read more


first_imgOscar has signed a new five-year deal with Chelsea, the Barclays Premier League leaders have confirmed. The 23-year-old joined the club from Internacional in the summer of 2012 and has been a vital member of the first-team since, scoring 11 goals last season. The attacking midfielder has added four more goals in 15 appearances this term and has now committed his future to Stamford Bridge until 2019. “I am so happy because I love playing for Chelsea and living in England,” he told the club’s official website. “I have enjoyed playing here for two years, and now I have five more, so I am very happy.” Since Mourinho’s return to west London last summer Oscar has been earmarked for a pivotal role, with the Portuguese’s insistence that he play the number 10 role seen as a large factor in Juan Mata’s exit to Manchester United. But Oscar has repaid his manager’s faith, and that of Roberto Di Matteo who signed him, with a total of 27 goals in 126 Blues appearances. Oscar began his career in his homeland with Sao Paulo but soon moved to Internacional where he spent two years before moving to the Blues for a fee of just under £20million. He scored twice on his first start for the club in Champions League and helped the team to win the Europa League in 2013. Oscar has also amassed 40 caps for Brazil since making his debut against Argentina in 2011 and has scored 11 times, including the only goal in the 7-1 humbling by Germany in last summer’s World Cup semi-final. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more


first_img Press Association Advocaat has confirmed the 27-year-old midfielder, who was charged with three offences of sexual activity with a child under 16 and one of grooming on Thursday, remains available for selection with the club reviewing the situation. For the time being at least, the Black Cats’ position remains unchanged, and that means Johnson, who has been used as a substitute in the last three games, can play on as Sunderland battle relegation. Sunderland boss Dick Advocaat has insisted it was not a difficult decision to include Adam Johnson in his squad for Saturday’s Barclays Premier League trip to Stoke. Advocaat’s side currently sit 16th in the table, but just a point clear of the bottom three, and he has set them a target of at least six points to avoid the drop. In the circumstances, he needs all the players he can get, and especially a man who cost £10million when he arrived from Manchester City during the summer of 2012. Johnson’s continued presence could prove all the more important after the Dutchman revealed that striker Steven Fletcher travelled to London on Friday to consult a specialist over a troublesome ankle injury. Asked if it was a difficult situation for a coach, Advocaat replied: “No, because the club made a statement about it and I stay behind that, and we will wait and see what the future will bring. “He still has to come in, but in principle if he feels okay, then he will be a member of the squad. If he’s in the squad, then I will consider him for selection, otherwise he would not be in the squad.” Johnson has already been the target of unsavoury chants from fans of rival clubs, but Advocaat is confident that will not be an issue during the final weeks of the season. He said: “No, I don’t think so.” Advocaat’s comments came after Sunderland released a statement outlining their position on the matter. It said: “Following yesterday’s statement from Durham Constabulary, the club recognises that the formal legal process must take its course and whilst our position remains unchanged, we will keep the matter under review. “The club will not be making any further comment.” Johnson is due to appear at Peterlee Magistrates’ Court on May 20 – the Black Cats face Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium that evening – but in theory, should be available to play in the other five games Sunderland have in which to preserve their top-flight status. last_img read more