first_imgFollowing the phenomenal success of last year’s nationally acclaimed ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’, Donegal Youth Musical Theatre (DYMT) has announced that they will return to An Grianan Theatre this summer with a brand new, reimagined revival of Lionel Bart’s West End legendary hit musical, OLIVER!Putting their own artistic stamp on one of the most famous scores in musical theatre history, the finest young actors from across the country will bring the tale of Oliver Twist to life in this vibrant recreated adaptation, featuring songs such as ‘Food Glorious Food’, ‘Consider Yourself’ and ‘I’d Do Anything’.DYMT is now recognised as one of Ireland’s most prestigious Youth Musical Theatre training companies, offering a select group of the country’s finest and most promising young actors an opportunity to experience the professional industry in Donegal each summer. DMYT. Photo: Paul Kelly.Rehearsing over a three week intensive period, successful cast members will work with some of the industry’s best regarded creatives and tutors from across Ireland, the West End and beyond.Last year ‘Phantom of the Opera’ and West End star Celinde Schoenmaker joined DYMT’s JCS team, with Rob Houchen (Cameron Mackintosh’s Les Misérables) also amongst their all-star tutors.West End actor Celinde Schoenmaker, Director Séimí Campbell with DYMT’s JCS Cast 2019Following the incredible national reviews from his adaptation of Jesus Christ Superstar, DYMT’s Artistic Director, Séimí Campbell returns from London for three weeks to direct this year’s revival.Séimí is currently working on ‘Come From Away’ (Phoenix Theatre) and ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ (Barbican Theatre), and is Resident Director on the UK premiere of ‘Amour’ (Charing Cross Theatre); all three running in the West End this summer. Irish West End and Broadway star Rachel Tucker recently encouraged all young Irish actors who wish to work in Musical Theatre to ‘start their training with the fabulous DYMT this summer – as they act as a brilliant stepping stone to London.’DMYT. Photo: Paul Kelly.Auditions for this ‘glorious’ new OLIVER! production will be held in May 2019.For more information or an audition application form, email DYMT’s Casting Team on dymtoliver@gmail.com.This new adaptation requires an older cast up to 24 years. A small children’s troop will also be cast (10-12 years). Rehearsals will run daily from 24th July – 12th August in Letterkenny, with the production running in An Grianan Theatre from Tuesday 13th – Saturday 17th August 2019.With last year’s cast travelling from as far as Belfast and Dublin, don’t miss out on this incredible introduction to your professional career this summer. Donegal Youth Musical Theatre announce casting call for OLIVER! was last modified: April 5th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:actingDonegal Youth Musical TheatreOlivertheatrelast_img read more


first_imgNigel Williams tried to explain in Current Biology1 why “size matters” among marine iguanas in the Galapagos Islands: the vectors of natural and sexual selection don’t always line up.  Females appear to like the big males when times are good, but when drought comes, the smaller dudes do better.    There’s a difficulty with such investigations.  Even though this habitat was a “rich source of information for Charles Darwin when developing his theory of evolution,” the article admits that “Factors influencing the evolution of complex traits such as body size are notoriously difficult to study but a new review of work on marine iguanas in the Galapagos islands suggests an answer may lie in the interplay of natural and sexual selection” (emphasis added).1Nigel Williams, “Size matters,” Current Biology, Volume 15, Issue 18, 20 September 2005, Page R742.Why should Darwin be mentioned in this article, except as a historical embarrassment?  There is no evolution here.  Heap big iguana is still iguana as much as peewee.  Size is not a “complex trait” in the sense of evolving wings or some new organs; it is just a modification of parts already present.  There is no long-term evolutionary trend here, but rather only oscillations around a mean that reflect climate conditions – otherwise we should see iguanas the size of Godzilla by now.  If natural and sexual selection work against each other, then stasis rules, not evolution.  Charlie won’t get anywhere with slippage on the treadmill (see 03/17/2003 entry).(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jeff Reese, OCJ marketing specialistThis is a busy time of year for everyone involved in agriculture. If you are not in a field working you are most likely in some form of support role. I have never been directly responsible for the helping with the grain farming but since the loss of my 98-year-old Grandpa two months ago I have felt a pull to the farm.My uncle has been the “farmer” in our family for as long as I can remember but my grandpa was always there with him. His brother has been a major piece of the puzzle but my grandpa was always there. With the loss of Grandpa things are just a little different.My wife and I have joked that maybe between the two of us we can help to fill the void Grandpa left helping my uncle on the farm. She can be the brains and I can try not to break things. The truth is that because my Grandpa was always there we didn’t grow up in the tractor or in the field. Things are just going to be different now that Grandpa isn’t around.It was with this in mind that I called my uncle up on a beautiful Monday evening and asked what I could do to help. What I really wanted to do was sit out in the sun and wait for the groundhog that had been digging up our tree fields. Visions of me triumphantly slaying this irksome beast and then hunting for mushrooms had me wavering on my promise to help. Ultimately my desire to help my uncle won the day, and that groundhog will have to wait until the crops are in the ground. Priorities are just different now that Grandpa isn’t around.My anxiety to help in the fields is real. My fear is that I will break or mess something up and cost more time than I am saving. But things have a funny way of working out. What my uncle really needed help with was tilling the garden. This is a job I can confidently accomplish! The scope of the garden was not something I had taken into consideration, though. See, my Grandpa loved sweet corn, he loved squash, he loved tomatoes, he loved onions and he loved potatoes too. My Grandpa had a prolific garden and even at 98 he was planning on growing enough for him, my uncle and the surrounding community to share. It was not unusual to see asparagus exchanges in the church parking lot on Sunday mornings or coolers full or sweet corn dropped on a neighbor’s porch. I have fond memories of hot summer mornings husking corn in the shade so that we could freeze enough to last through the winter. It may be different without my Grandpa but maybe I can help keep his memory alive in my own small way this year.As I fired up the tiller I had visions of perfectly straight lines with no footprints in the freshly tilled garden soil. I fought to keep the tiller in line and make everything perfect. I wanted to make Grandpa proud. Then something dawned on me, Grandpa wasn’t about doing everything perfectly. He was about doing it right. Grandpa worked this exact ground with a horse drawn plow as a child. He has kept it in his family for his 98 years. Clearly he was doing something right. Being a part of the farm can take on many different shapes. Each job requires a different set of skills, but they all take a level of determination to do it right, to the best of your ability. I realized that maybe I can’t do everything the way he did and it will take time to learn the best way to do things. I just hope, in one small way, that maybe things didn’t have to be so different even though Grandpa isn’t around this year.last_img read more


first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Related Posts Identity is crucial, as Schuermans stresses, because it keeps users engaged with Facebook even if they aren’t actively sharing: “If users don’t just use Facebook as their social network, but also to access scores of unrelated services, then it will be hard for users to drop Facebook entirely.”By making Facebook the center of our digital lives, Facebook makes itself an essential, profitable place for developers to build. 3. Out-Googling Google For Effective Mobile AdvertisingIn Facebook’s quest to sell user reach, engagement and hyper-targeting to advertisers, thereby enriching its developer community and itself, Facebook may be out-Googling Google. In particular, Facebook’s App Links builds bridges between apps, thereby creating a new, searchable application web to rival the non-app web. Schuermans writes:In the most optimistic case, Applinks will allow Facebook to build the PageRank of mobile, a head-on attack on its arch rival. (Facebook has already kindly offered to host an index of all applinks.) At worst, Applinks can substantially boost Facebook’s app install business (CPI) through affiliate marketing schemes, earning revenue on each referral.All Your Developers Are Belong To UsFacebook, once the mobile laggard, is now a mobile leader, particularly with developers. While it still has a long way to go, its strategy of making it easy for developers to build for its platform, coupled with its efforts to make applications an effective advertising target, is winning over developers and stealing a march on Google and Apple. Image of Mark Zuckerberg by Flickr user kris krüg, CC 2.0 It’s a good thing mobile app developers say they’re not in it for the money, because the reality is that the average per-app revenue is under $4,000, according to VisionMobile’s 2012 developer survey. Given the difficulty of standing out on “brutally competitive” mobile app stores like Apple’s App Store or Google Play, it’s easy to see why developers struggle to make much money from their work. There are more than a million apps on the App Store: how likely is it that yours will be the next Angry Birds?Enter FacebookSensing an opportunity, Facebook has pounced. While Facebook used to get knocked for being too dependent on desktop revenue, the company has completely shifted its strategy so that today it generates more than 60% of its revenues from mobile. The heart of Facebook’s mobile strategy is developers.And the way to appeal to developers, says analyst Ben Thompson, is money:One of the key lessons I learned working with developers is that, at the end of the day, everything pales in comparison to the question: “How do I make money?” Developer tools are important, languages are important, exposure is important, but if there isn’t money to be made—or if more money can be made elsewhere—then you’re not going to get very far in getting developers on your platform.Facebook’s mobile developer strategy is comprised of three components, according to Schuermans, each geared toward making developers more money:1. Building A Mega SDKFacebook has been acquiring companies at a torrid pace these past few years, but not for their developer communities. As VisionMobile founder Andreas Constantinou rightly posits, ecosystems aren’t for sale:Instead of buying developers, Facebook has been acquiring essential tools to serve a growing community of developers, including Monoidics (bug checking), Parse (back-end as a service), Airlock (A/B testing framework) and more. To these acquisitions Facebook has added homegrown services to support app promotion, monetization and re-engagement. Facebook, in other words, is gearing up to make app development easy and profitable for mobile developers, recognizing that traditional app stores have done little but provide a weak app discovery mechanism for developers. 2. Making Facebook The Center Of Users’ Digital IdentitiesIt’s interesting to note that identity topped Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s list of the essential elements of a “cross-platform platform” at the recent F8 developer conference: Tags:#app developers#Apple#Facebook#Google#iOS How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees?center_img Developers who want to make money may want to spend less time with Apple and Google and more time with Facebook. Though both Google and Apple trumpet their vast app ecosystems, the reality is that it’s hard for app developers to stand out on these platforms and, hence, egregiously difficult for such developers to make a living. Unless they want to focus on Facebook, that is. As VisionMobile analyst Stijn Schuermans highlights, while app developers will continue to depend on Google and Apple for distribution, Facebook’s mobile developer strategy is better suited to help them reach users, get discovered and make money.Mobile’s Crowd Of IndividualsApple has paid developers over $15 billion since launching the App Store in July 2008. While Google’s Android platform has not been as generous historically, it’s catching up. But neither is a particularly great way to make money for most developers, as VisionMobile’s data indicates: Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Matt Asay Why You Love Online Quizzeslast_img read more


first_imgThe curfew in Jammu continued for the second day and the Army’s presence was stepped up on Saturday, a day after violent protests rocked the city over a suicide attack that killed 40 CRPF jawans in Kashmir. Nine more Army columns were deployed in the city, bringing the total to 18, and the force staged flag marches in sensitive localities. Officials said the University of Jammu postponed all examinations scheduled for the day and mobile Internet services remained suspended across Jammu region. Srinagar-bound vehicles stranded on the Jammu-Srinagar national highway due to a landslide in Ramban were allowed to move forward amid tight security arrangements, they said.last_img read more


first_imgThe MPA, the Association of Magazine Media, has selected a new leader after 13 years—Mary Berner will replace outgoing Nina Link as the group’s new president and CEO effective September 17.Most recently, Berner was president and CEO of Reader’s Digest Association (RDA), a position she vacated in April 2011. Berner had guided RDA through a pre-packaged bankruptcy, officially emerging from Chapter 11 protection in February 2010.  A year later, she left the company just as it named a new board of directors.Berner was also a board member of RDA from 2007 to 2011. Under her direction, the company launched 83 websites, and 31 mobile applications; Allrecipes.com expanded into 22 countries, and Reader’s Digest Magazine became one of the Kindle’s best-selling monthly magazines. Nina Link, who has been MPA’s president and CEO for the last 13 years, announced in June she was stepping down. Her tenure at the top spot with the association was longer than any MPA president in its 93-year history.In the past, Berner served on the board of MPA—the association includes 225 domestic magazine media companies with more than 1,000 titles, nearly 50 international companies and more than 100 associate members.”I love a challenge—especially when the facts are on our side—as is the case with the strengths of magazine media,” says Berner in a release.  “I’m bullish on the fact that magazine brands offer their consumers and advertisers incredibly powerful and unique value on every platform.  I look forward to working with the MPA board to strongly and loudly push our member organization’s agenda forward. The industry deserves nothing less.”last_img read more


first_imgPriyadarshini Sen Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: Priyadarshini Sen News Priyadarshini Sen,Load Comments,VA’s revised policies on symbols, displays aim to protect ‘religious liberty� … Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,SRINAGAR, India (RNS) — In his starched kameez pajama and a blue turban —vestments of distinction in this northernmost part of India — Sartaj Sofi holds the gaze of over 500 devotees during Friday prayers.“We need to follow the teachings of Islam to practice sound ecology in our valley,” says the 30-year-old religious preacher, his voice rippling through the large prayer hall.Sofi’s sermons, though impeccably religious, vary from tradition in one surprising detail. For three years, Sofi has been one of a growing number of preachers in the Kashmir Valley to sensitize the local Muslims to eco-consciousness through an appeal to their faith.“Years of violence and state surveillance have depleted our natural resources, along with climate change,” said Sofi. “Ordinary people are now turning to religion,” he said.There are more than 7,500 mosques and seminaries in the Muslim-majority Kashmir Valley, of which more than 6,000 are of the Hanafi Sunni order. Another approximately 200 are shrines of the mystical Sufi sect of Islam.Since 1947, the majority-Muslim region of Kashmir has been caught between India and Pakistan, which emerged as two sovereign states after the wrenching end of colonial rule by Britain. The nuclear-armed neighbors have fought two wars here, which both claim in full but control in part.Religious preacher Sartaj Sofi. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenAfter years of conflict that has harmed the valley’s natural beauty, the locals here have more faith in religious preachers like Sofi to protect their heritage than they do the government, explained Farooq Ahmed, an imam from Srinagar.“Civilians are distrustful of government programs since they haven’t stopped activities such as deforestation, soil erosion and extinction of biodiversity in Kashmir,” said Ahmed.In particular, locals blame government apathy and corruption for the state of Dal Lake, an urban waterway once hailed as a jewel in the crown of Kashmir, that is now a weed-clogged swamp.Illegal encroachments and sewage disposal in the lake have imperiled the livelihoods of the owners of shikaras, colorful wooden houseboats that lodge tourists, as well as the vegetable sellers who make their living along the lakeshore.Ghulam Rasool Dar, a boatman who has spent more than 70 years around Dal Lake, says the absence of a proper anti-pollution program is due to the unstable political situation in Kashmir.Moreover, in the last two decades or so, security forces have allegedly cleared vast tracts of forestland to prevent militants from taking cover in the forests.One result of the deforestation in recent years has been the unprecedented floods that have killed more than 300 people in 2014, as hundreds of villages, bridges and roads were washed away.The Centre for Science and Environment, a research and advocacy group in Delhi, attributed the floods to “unplanned urbanization, encroachments, climate change and a lack of preparedness.”Shaheena Parveen, a government municipal committee president in Bijbehara, a town outside Srinagar, defended the local government’s efforts to reverse the effects of the conflict. “The government is working tirelessly to boost Kashmir’s economy, tourism and environment. Years of conflict have derailed the state.”Since 2015, the government has dispatched mobile vans in neighborhoods around Srinagar to spread eco-consciousness; shiny billboards and hoardings with verses from the Quran are more commonly seen in villages and towns; and street theater has gained popularity.But imams in the Bijbehara town said people’s crisis of faith has increased since the 2014 floods, and they continually blame the government for never rising above conflict.“People are therefore inclined to disengage with government programs since they are hollow promises. They are looking to faith leaders for solutions,” said imam Farooq Ahmed.“The floods were the flashpoint,” says Pir Masood-ul-Haq, an administrator at the Hazratbal shrine in Srinagar, widely considered the holiest Muslim shrine in Kashmir. “The calamity spurred us to sensitize people at shrines and mosques about conserving our environment.”Masood-ul-Haq has taken to teaching the nearly 50,000 devotees who congregate at the white marble shrine each Friday how a strict ascetic discipline can restore Kashmir’s natural diversity. He makes his case by citing Sheikh Noor-ud-Din Wali, a 14th-century Kashmiri Sufi saint who founded the Rishi movement, promoting harmony with nature in ways that seem to anticipate contemporary responses to climate change.Muslim devotees at the Aishmuqam Shrine, near Anantnag District of Kashmir Valley, India, where a sermon on environmental conservation was held on June 21, 2019. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenThe Rishis would plant fruit-bearing trees wherever they went and espoused non-violence, based on their view that religion should primarily focus on man’s treatment of his fellow beings.Their eco-consciousness, Masood-ul-Haq said, “comes not from focusing on the afterlife as religious leaders have done, but by cultivating a strong spiritual tradition in this life like the Rishi order.”Inspired by the Rishi’s ethic, Kashmiri religious leaders are mobilizing action to prevent use of plastics, fossil fuels and pesticides.Besides the appeal to ancient philosophies, the imams’ environmental push is relying as well on the urgency felt by young Kashmiris. “There’s a spurt in religiosity among the youth who see mosques and shrines as platforms to reach a wider audience at the grassroots level,” said Fayaz Ahmed Rather, an administrator for the Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Waqf Board, a local religious charitable endowment.“Mosques have been used for socio-political ends in our conflict-ridden society,” said Asif Hussain Wani, a student at an industrial training institute near Srinagar. “But now, we see them as powerful vehicles to spread environmental consciousness.”It is no coincidence that Sufis are leading voices in the green movement here. Fayaz Rather, who also preaches at a mosque in Aishmuqam that is dedicated to a key Rishi figure, believes that the ecological crisis arises from a modern faith in science over a characteristic Sufi asceticism.In the days when “people relied on mythologies and ancient texts over scientific knowledge,” said Rather, care for the environment was a given.That sometimes abstruse connection between faith and the planet, however, has recently trickled down to NGOs and academics, who have begun collaborating with religious leaders.Since last year, the Community of Education, Research and Development, an NGO in Kashmir’s Anantnag district, has convinced more than 20 imams to start the conversation on “environmental spirituality” in cities, towns and villages.“Many anthropogenic activities and policy paralysis have destroyed Kashmir. We want to regain our paradise,” said Aabid Hussain Mir, the organization’s president.Azra Nahid Kamili, a professor of environmental science at the University of Kashmir, says scientists are also working closely with religion scholars and preachers.In 2017, the Central University of Kashmir organized an international conference on conservation of the environment and the role of religion, where theologians and religious leaders were invited from the United States, Bosnia and India.Amid all the emphasis on religion, Sartaj Sofi says that environmental consciousness is a matter primarily of the welfare of Kashmiri society.“It’s important to remember what Sufi saint Sheikh Noor-ud-Din Wali had said in the 14th century. Our food will last as long as forests last.” Share This! By: Priyadarshini Sen AP-NORC Poll: Americans rarely seek guidance from clergy Share This! Catholicism As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Tagsenvironmentalism faith and environment homepage featured India Kashmir,You may also like By: Priyadarshini Sen Share This! Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more