first_imgDog and dog’s best friend, CacheDweebDid you know there are groups of gadget cache builders who slave away, day after day, week after week, huddled deep inside cluttered garages, endlessly tinkering with magnets, locks, pulleys, springs, clasps, and other such bric-a-brac? They do this for you, to put a smile on your face, and in turn, an even bigger smile on their own. Meet one such clever cache creator, CacheDweeb. His claw-machine, drawer-popping, and sound-enhanced DONKEY KACHE was featured as a Geocache of the Week. We ask a few questions, get a few answers, and learn the method behind the madness of this master cache owner. Geocache of the Week: DONKEY CACHEGeocaching HQ: What’s your background outside of geocaching?CacheDweeb: I work in IT. I’m not an engineer, but I love tinkering with things and figuring how stuff works. I like biking, hiking, and kayaking and besides geocaching, my hobbies include woodworking and building/flying giant scale radio controlled airplanes.CacheDweeb at a kayak event GC766XYGeocaching HQ: How and when did you hear about geocaching?CacheDweeb: My brother introduced me to geocaching in 2015. He had been doing it for 6 months, and then explained it to me while we were on a camping trip. After going out and finding a few caches with him, I was hooked. I already hike/bike/kayak, so geocaching just adds more to outdoor adventures.Geocaching HQ: What got you hooked?CacheDweeb: After finding about 200 caches, I happened to stumble across one of WVTim’s gadget cache videos. Once I saw that, those were the caches that I wanted to find. Not having anything like that in my immediate area, I decided to build a gadget cache and put it out. The local cachers loved it. Since then that’s what I’ve been building and placing.Geocaching HQ: What keeps you engaged in the game?CacheDweeb: I think what keeps me engaged are my friends. Since I’ve started geocaching, I met a lot of great cachers who are now some of my closest friends. I don’t get out to cache as often as I like, but I belong to a committee called the C-Mass Geofest (Central Massachusetts) who work with the Sturbridge Tourist Association and the Chamber of Commerce. We’ve been hosting large Event Caches for four years now.I also belong to a local Gadget Cache Builders group. It is a secret closed group on Facebook, with about 25 gadget cache builders, including WVTim. It is strictly for builders only, as the information on there is all spoilers. We share our projects, our skills and experience, and our friendships. They are all a great group of people.Geocaching HQ: For you, what makes a quality cache?CacheDweeb: One that is well maintained and fits its surroundings, whether it’s camouflaged or in plain sight. Of course, I love gadget caches, but I also like ‘unique’ hides, or what I call “something other than Tupperware”.Geocaching HQ: What’s the best approach to take when creating a geocache?CacheDweeb: I think the best approach is to choose materials for the container which blend in with its surroundings, and most of all, hold up to the climate it is placed in. As far as the best approach to creating gadget caches, you need to make them as bullet-proof as possible. Use materials that will hold up to a large number of cachers poking, pulling, and pushing everything on it. Also, you need to select the correct materials for the type of climate it will be in. For example, here in New England, we get everything from heat, wet, cold, and chill-to-the-bone frozen. Using wood for push/pull rods or slides won’t last because the wood swells in the humidity. You can use plastic or metal, which will work better and last much longer. Also, you need to test, test, test before you have your gadget cache published. I have my muggle family and friends test my gadget caches so I can see what works and what might need improvement.Think it, build it, test it, hide it. Oh, and maintain it!Geocaching HQ: Do you find it difficult to perform maintenance on gadget caches?CacheDweeb: In the beginning, yes. After many builds, you learn to spot problem areas before they become problems. The right materials are key. For example, rather than using kite string through pulleys, you’re better off using high-strength fishing line since it’s much more durable and will last a lot longer than any other string. I found this out the hard way on my DONKEY KACHE gadget cache. It was published just before a large event. The original string originally could not hold up to the wear and tear of so many cachers using it on one weekend. Geocaching HQ: Have you ever had an idea that you thought was impossible?CacheDweeb: Sure, all the time! As a builder, I keep a notebook that I add ideas to, so I don’t forget them. And they come to you in the oddest places. Once I was at my nephew’s hockey game. After the game, some of his teammates skated over to get off the ice and pushed down on a button on the top of the rink gate. On the outside of the gate where I was standing, it was open, so you could see how everything worked. At that moment, I had no idea what I would ever use that locking mechanism for, but I just had to take a photo of it with my phone for my “You never know” folder.Geocaching HQ: Do you have any great ideas brewing?CacheDweeb: This year, I started learning how to code caches with sound effects. Since I have a background as an IT developer with various code languages, the learning curve was easy. I’m building a payphone gadget cache that will ring and accept certain phone numbers. It should be out in the spring of 2019.Geocaching HQ: If someone was looking to you for inspiration what would you tell them?CacheDweeb: You don’t necessarily need to have skills or power tools to put out a creative cache. You just need your imagination. It doesn’t have to be as complicated as a gadget cache. I think the average cacher would rather find a unique container over Tupperware any day.CacheDweeb is number one!Geocaching HQ: Thanks so much for talking with us. Any last thoughts on geocaching?CacheDweeb: The great thing about geocaching is you can do it pretty much anywhere. If you’re on a business trip, or out on vacation somewhere, you can always take a look around to find out if there are any caches nearby. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedDONKEY KACHE — Geocache of the WeekDecember 19, 2018In “Community”Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniacMarch 12, 2019In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Auburn Sea (GC3QGYZ) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 3, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more


first_imgThe MPA, the Association of Magazine Media, has selected a new leader after 13 years—Mary Berner will replace outgoing Nina Link as the group’s new president and CEO effective September 17.Most recently, Berner was president and CEO of Reader’s Digest Association (RDA), a position she vacated in April 2011. Berner had guided RDA through a pre-packaged bankruptcy, officially emerging from Chapter 11 protection in February 2010.  A year later, she left the company just as it named a new board of directors.Berner was also a board member of RDA from 2007 to 2011. Under her direction, the company launched 83 websites, and 31 mobile applications; Allrecipes.com expanded into 22 countries, and Reader’s Digest Magazine became one of the Kindle’s best-selling monthly magazines. Nina Link, who has been MPA’s president and CEO for the last 13 years, announced in June she was stepping down. Her tenure at the top spot with the association was longer than any MPA president in its 93-year history.In the past, Berner served on the board of MPA—the association includes 225 domestic magazine media companies with more than 1,000 titles, nearly 50 international companies and more than 100 associate members.”I love a challenge—especially when the facts are on our side—as is the case with the strengths of magazine media,” says Berner in a release.  “I’m bullish on the fact that magazine brands offer their consumers and advertisers incredibly powerful and unique value on every platform.  I look forward to working with the MPA board to strongly and loudly push our member organization’s agenda forward. The industry deserves nothing less.”last_img read more