first_imgHarry Redknapp believes Yossi Benayoun would snub a move to Spain if QPR agree to give him a contract.The 33-year-old Israeli has been without a club since leaving Chelsea when his contract at Stamford Bridge expired during the summer.QPR were among several clubs who were then approached about signing Benayoun on a two-year deal and more recently his representatives suggested Rangers wanted him, leading to reports he was set for a move to Loftus Road.West London Sport revealed that R’s boss Redknapp had merely suggested Benayoun could join on trial and had not heard from him since.Redknapp offered Benayoun a trialBenayoun, who made his name in the Premier League at West Ham and had a spell at Liverpool before joining Chelsea in 2010, is keen to return to London.His bargaining position appeared to be strengthened by injuries to QPR’s Niko Kranjcar and Alejandro Faurlin as well as on-loan Tottenham midfielder Tom Carroll.But Redknapp remains adamant that he wants to take a look at Benayoun in training before deciding whether to sign him.“I’ve always liked Benayoun as a player but it would be another wage on the wage bill,” said Redknapp.“If he was reasonable and it would be a reasonable deal he would be a good asset. It’s something we’d look at.“I haven’t heard from Yossi yet though. I think he’s got a couple of Spanish clubs who want him.“If we wanted to do it I think he’d rather come back to London and play. We’ll see what happens.”Man Utd v Arsenal: free bets offer for West London Sport readers See also:Ex-Chelsea man Benayoun offered QPR trialNo sign of Benayoun after offer of QPR trialQPR boss leaves door open for BenayounOnuoha back and Kranjcar may face ReadingSpurs’ Carroll edges closer to Rangers returnBenayoun impresses during Rangers trialBenayoun enters talks over Rangers dealQPR board reluctant to bring in BenayounQPR discuss shorter-term Benayoun dealBenayoun deal is done, says QPR’s BondQPR set to confirm six-month Benayoun dealRangers confirm the signing of Benayoun 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceAround 8 p.m. Thursday Erik Harris went to print his new Raiders contract, but his printer had no ink.A friend nearby printed Harris’ two-year deal and ran it over instead. After Harris and his wife corralled their four children for a picture, everyone wearing Raiders gear posing with Harris holding pen to paper, he went to scan the contract and send it to the Raiders.The scanner wouldn’t connect to the computer. …last_img read more


first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Infrastructure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Eastern Cape province: The breakwater made of dolosse at the new Ngqura Harbour, next to the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The new system of roads and other infrastructure at the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The breakwater at the new Ngqura Harbour, next to the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: A project to widen the road and lay bigger water pipes, on the N2 national road near Storms River. Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The bridge over the Storms River in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Nelson Mandela Drive is the main road through the city. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Nelson Mandela Drive is the main road through the city. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Telkom’s microwave tower on Naval Hill. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Telkom’s microwave tower on Naval Hill. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image INFRASTRUCTURE 9: {loadposition infrastructure}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more


first_imgOverall, Time Warner reported $2.65 billion in operating profit through the first half (up more than 30 percent) on $12.69 billion in revenue. The company also upgraded its outlook for 2010, projecting adjusted earnings per share of at least 20 percent. That’s up from its May 5 outlook for adjusted EPS of growth at least in the mid-teens. Consumer publishing giant Time Inc. reported an operating income of $203 million through the first six months of 2010, nearly three times the $70 million it pulled in during the same period last year, according to parent company Time Warner, which reported its first-half financial earnings Wednesday. Revenues at the publishing group remained flat at roughly $1.72 billion.During the second quarter, Time Inc. reported an operating income of $153 million, up 50 percent from $102 million during the same three-month period in 2009. Revenues remained steady compared to last year’s period at $919 million.Time Inc. attributed the profit gains to company-wide cost savings initiatives which resulted in lower pension expenses. It also cited higher domestic magazine revenues in print and digital. Advertising revenue during the second quarter grew 4 percent, subscription revenues stayed flat and other revenues dropped 23 percent. Meanwhile, the company says it increased its share of U.S. magazine advertising to 21 percent—a gain of 1.8 percent points from the same period last year.last_img read more


first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneOn the last day of the 85th Legislative session, protesters opposed to Senate Bill 4 — the “sanctuary cities” bill fill up the rotunda of the state Capitol in Austin on May 29, 2017.Opponents of the state’s immigration enforcement legislation have asked a federal appeals court to reconsider a decision that allowed most of the controversial measure to go into effect.Attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union, Travis County and the city of Austin on Tuesday asked the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear the case en banc, which means the entire court would consider the lawsuit. The move comes two weeks after a three-judge panel of the same court allowed most of the law, Senate Bill 4, to go into effect after major portions were initially blocked by a federal district judge in August. The ACLU represents the small border city of El Cenizo, which was the first to file suit last year to stop SB 4’s implementation days after Gov. Greg Abbottsigned it into law.SB 4 allows local law enforcement officers to question the immigration status of people they detain or arrest and punishes local government department heads and elected officials who don’t cooperate with federal immigration “detainers” — requests by agents to turn over immigrants subject to possible deportation — in the form of jail time and penalties that exceed $25,000. The legislation also applies to public universities and colleges.In August, U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia temporarily halted several parts of the bill, including a section that requires jail officials to honor the detainers. He also blocked sections that prohibit local entities from pursuing “a pattern or practice that ‘materially limits’ the enforcement of immigration laws” and another that prohibits “assisting or cooperating” with federal immigration officers as reasonable or necessary.But the appellate court panel’s ruling two weeks ago effectively unshackled the legislation, allowing most of it to be implemented while the original case goes back to Garcia’s courtroom. The only provision that is still blocked is one that punishes local officials for “adopting, enforcing or endorsing” policies that prohibit or limit enforcement of immigration laws. The judges kept that injunction in place but said it only applies to the word “endorse.”The list of local entities that have previously filed suit against SB 4 also includes El Paso, Maverick and Bexar counties, the cities of El Paso, San Antonio and Houston, among others. Nina Perales, the vice president of litigation for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, or MALDEF, said if the 5th Circuit agrees to hear the case, all parties to the suit will become involved. MALDEF represents the cities of San Antonio and El Paso, as well as Bexar County, in the litigation.“We are all supporting each other’s efforts and working together in close collaboration and putting our resources in a two-pronged strategy,” she said.The other angle is preparing for the trial at the district level, where Garcia will hear arguments over the bill’s constitutionality. Perales said it’s unclear when — or if — the 5th Circuit will come down with a decision on Tuesday’s petition. Another option is to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the injunction, but Perales said plaintiffs have to wait on the appellate court to act before considering that move.“It’s like a decision tree, and we won’t know what options are available to us until the 5th Circuit responds,” she said.After the court’s decision earlier this month that allowed most of the bill to stand, several opponents of the measure said they weren’t surprised because the 5th Circuit is considered a conservative body. But Perales warned against painting any group of judges with “too broad a brush.”She pointed to a 2013 decision by the same court in favor of MALDEF during its case against the Texas city of Farmers Branch, which passed an ordinance that would have punished landlords from renting to people based on their immigration status. “These are the life lessons that teach you not to predict what the 5th Circuit might do or how they might decide a case,” she said. Sharelast_img read more