first_imgIn Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery MOST READ Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism UFC officially strips inactive McGregor of 155-pound title View comments LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters “He’s been excellent,” LeBron James said. “He’s been an extension from our head coach and we’re all working toward the same goals and it’s great to have him. He’s been a head coach in this league for years as well so it’s great to have that security blanket.”Drew’s main job during Lue’s absence was to keep the team and now the coaching staff has to figure out lineup rotations in advance of the playoffs.Cleveland’s roster has been in nearly constant flux because of injuries and other issues. Forward Kyle Korver played Tuesday for the first time since leaving the team on March 19 to be with family following his brother’s death in Iowa. Also, starting point guard George Hill has missed the past two games with a sprained left ankle.“It’s been a really trying stretch,” Drew said. “Given what we’ve already gone through this season, you know, as a team you can only take so much. The way our guys have persevered over these last 10 says a lot about the character of this team.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lue, who has been away from the team since March 19 so he could focus on his health, has been cleared to resume his duties, said the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation.Lue had been experiencing chest pains, insomnia and other symptoms when he agreed to take a leave of absence from the three-time defending Eastern Conference champions. Lue’s illness is among several setbacks this season for the Cavs, who have encountered numerous injuries and revamped their roster with three trades in February.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownThe 40-year-old Lue is coming back with four games left in the regular season and the Cavs clinging to the No. 3 seed in the postseason. After hosting the Wizards, the Cavs will play at Philadelphia and play the New York Knicks twice next week.Lue recently returned in an advisory capacity and has been at home games, but stayed behind the scenes at Quicken Loans Arena. He has been attending the team’s shootarounds for the past week and working his way back into a normal routine. Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims “He’s kind of been gradually getting back into it,” associate coach Larry Drew said before Tuesday’s win over Toronto. “I can see that the guys have already embraced him. So it’s just a matter of him being more hands-on now once he does get back.“Just from what I’ve seen, it looks like everybody has rolled their sleeves up and just waiting for the day he comes back so they can get to work. Right now, it looks no different than when he left.”Lue is in his third season with Cleveland. He replaced David Blatt midway through the 2016 season and guided the Cavs to an NBA title, the first for any of Cleveland’s three major pro sports franchises since the Browns won an NFL championship in 1964.While Lue was away, the Cavs went 8-1 under associate coach Larry Drew, a former head coach who smoothly handled the transition and kept the Cavs from falling in the standings.Drew refused to take any credit, but Cleveland’s players acknowledged his steadiness has been important.ADVERTISEMENT Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FILE – In this Dec. 12, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers head coach Tyronn Lue yells instructions to players during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks in Cleveland. Lue is expected to attend the team’s game against New Orleans on Friday, March 30, 2018, but not sit on the bench. Lue has been on a medical leave and missed the past six games (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)CLEVELAND — Tyronn Lue is rejoining the Cavaliers’ disjointed season.Cleveland’s coach is expected to return from a medical absence and be back on the bench Thursday night against Washington, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press on Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more


first_imgJohannesburg, Tuesday 21 January 2014 – Brand South Africa will bring an opportunity to discuss education with specialists in the field, to the community in Soweto when it hosts the second Play Your Part/Sowetan dialogue in Soweto, Orlando West, Uncle Toms Hall on 22 January 2013.The dialogue will focus on the topic, “Why many learners and students start but don’t finish?” and is in line with the awareness that learners must stay in school to receive quality education.The discussion will be guided by:Adam Habib – Vice Chancellor at Wits UniversityVuyo Jack – CEO and founder of EmpowerdexPanyaza Lesufi – National Department of Basic EducationRosie Chirongoma – (PfP) Fundraising and Stakeholder Engagement at SymphoniaDr Jeffrey Mabelebele – Higher Education South AfricaBrand South Africa CEO Miller Matola said, “Education plays a significant role in growing a country and in its competitiveness. We therefore need to ensure our school system can deliver quality education to enrich our learners and provide them with the tools they need to be successful.”“I invite all those interested in ensuring our education system is able to deliver the kind of education that supports the intellectual growth and development of our young people to play their part and attend the dialogue,”  concluded Mr Matola.Sowetan Dialogues are public conversations held in local communities across the country. They provide a platform for discussions on issues that affect societies and what we can collectively do to improve these conditions.Media are invited to attend as follows:Date   :        Wednesday, 22 January 2013Venue :        Soweto, Orlando West, Uncle Toms Hall(See map and location documents attached or visit https://maps.google.co.za/maps?q=where+is+Soweto,+Orlando+West,+Uncle+Toms+Hall&ie=UTF-8&ei=TtPXUq7MEqbQ7Abmo4CgCA&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAgTime  :         18h00 for 18:30RSVP   :        Fikile MakhobaEmail: FikileM@brandsouthafrica.comMobile: 082 404 4856The entrance to the dialogue is free although places must be booked. To book please SMS keyword DIALOGUES, name and surname to 41936. SMSes are charged at R1.50/SMS. Free minutes do not apply. Booking line closes on 21st January 2014 at 12h00 noon. Confirmation will be sent via SMS or RSVP to obosel@sowetan.co.zaNote to editorsProfiles of the panelistsProfessor Adam HabibProfessor Adam Habib is the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of the Witwatersrand, and has served in this position as from the 1st of June 2013. He is an academic, an activist, an administrator, and a renowned political media commentator and columnist. A Professor of Political Science, Habib has more than 30 years of academic, research, institutional and administration expertise. His experience spans five universities and multiple local and international institutions, boards and task teams. His professional involvement in institutions has always been defined by three distinct engagements: the contest of ideas; their translation into actionable initiatives; and the building of institutions.Mr Panyaza LesufiMr Panyaza Lesufi is a spokesman for the Department of Basic Education. He was born in Tembisa where he led a number of youth and student structures before getting arrested under the 1988 Apartheid Emergency Regulation for belonging to then banned organizations (ANC, MK and COSAS). Mr Lesufi matriculated at Vital Link Student Cooperation and went on to study Business Administration at the University of Natal in Durban where he was voted President of the SRC. He served in the Senate, Council and EXCO of the University and was awarded the Best SRC President ever by the University Natal as well as the Albert Luthuli Inter-Personal Relations Award. He served as Deputy Regional Secretary of the ANC at Ekurhuleni for 10 years before being elected to the Provincial Executive Committee (PEC) of the ANC Gauteng Province. Mr Lesufi also served as a board member of the Ellis Park Disaster Fund and Chairperson of the Matthew Goniwe School of Leadership.Ms Rosie ChirongomaMs Rosie Chirongoma deals with Fundraising and Stakeholder Engagement at Symphonia. Ms Chirongoma’s interests include current affairs, creating awareness about the issues that affect African children and working with children in disadvantaged communities. Armed with a National Diploma in Architectural Technology, she lists strong leadership, good communication skills, being passionate and driven as well as willingness to take risks as her strengths. Ms Chirongoma has been actively involved in affecting change at a grassroots level in South Africa since 2007. Her list of community projects include: Big Brother Big Sister; the Paballo Ya Batho project which helps provide food, medical care and companionship to 500 destitute and homeless people living in the inner city of Johannesburg. In 2010, Ms Chirongoma spent her weekends looking after abandoned children at the TLC Children’s Home. She was recognised as a Nedbank Local Hero, in 2007, for providing 450 learners at New Generation School with learning resources and an environment conducive for learning in an informal settlement.Mr Vuyo JackVuyo Jack grew up in Dube, Soweto where he entertained the idea of becoming a film director, before a family friend in merchant banking changed his mind. He then decided to study accounting which he sees as a critical basis for informed economic decision-making, and as a central measure of business performance. Since co-founding Empowerdex, Vuyo was appointed as a member of the dti’s BEE Task Team in 2003 and has advised both government departments and various corporates on matters of BEE. Vuyo has a weekly column in Sunday’s Business Report on issues surrounding BEE. In addition to his role as Executive Chairman of Empowerdex, Vuyo lectures Financial Accounting at Wits on a part-time basis.Dr Jeffrey MabelebeleDr Jeffrey Mabelebele joined Higher Education South Africa (HESA) in 2009 as a Director, Operations and Sector Support.  Prior to this, he worked for the Human Sciences Research Council as a Researcher, Government Communication and Information System as a Director in the Project Office and the National Treasury’s Technical Assistance Unit as Director, Knowledge Management. His research interests include social values, identity and memory. Dr Mabelebele studied at the universities of Limpopo and UNISA. His work is published widely in accredited and peer reviewed journals.About Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness abroad. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand South Africa.Follow Brand South Africa@Brand_SA(https://twitter.com/Brand_SA)Tell us how you Play Your Parthttp://www.playyourpart.co.za/tellus-someone@PlayyourpartSAFor more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Fikile MakhobaEmail: FikileM@brandsouthafrica.comMobile: 071 155 9192Email: Fikilem@brandsouthafrica.comEndslast_img read more


first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now When I was a teenager, the last thing in the world I could ever imagine myself doing was wearing a suit and tie. I thought suits and ties were for what I termed “execudrioids.”I wore blue jeans that were tattered from being worn daily and washed infrequently. I wore muscle shirts under a black cotton button down shirts. I wore big Nike hightop tennis shoes. My hair was long, sometimes permed, sometimes highlighted. Both of my ears were pierced, one twice, one four times. Mostly I wore big hoop earrings.Looking like I did won me the attention of people who wanted to fight me for not conforming to their standards. This animosity started my Freshman year at the Catholic high school when a teacher who was also the wrestling coach told me to cut my shoulder length hair or lose it to his clippers. Left with no real choice, I cut it like Billy Idol’s and pierced both my ears. There were no rules about pierced ears yet, so the establishment wasn’t sure what to do with me.I started a rock-n-roll band my senior year of high school. I borrowed clothes, hairspray, and makeup from my Mom and my two sisters. At night, nothing was off-limits.After high school, I had to make a living. So I did something I never thought I’d do: I put on a suit and tie.I expected suits to be constraining. I equated a neck tie with a noose. But it wasn’t like that. Suits had clean lines and looked nice. Starched shirts felt crisp. The right tie gave a suit some pop.When I started selling, even though I was very young, my clients treated me with respect, like I deserved to be sitting in front of them. This even though I had my long hair tied in a ponytail that reached the middle of my back.It’s popular now for business people to dress like teenagers. But you will never look better or feel more confident than when you are wearing a killer suit, a crisp shirt, a sharp tie, and a nice pair of shoes.Treat yourself and buy a nice suit. Dress up. You’ll look good and you’ll feel better.last_img read more