first_imgIn a series of town halls this week, University administrators announced changes to the structure of the First Year of Studies, discussed a new early retirement program and provided updates on new recycling standards and construction projects.In a response to a question about changes to the First Year of Studies, University provost Thomas Burish confirmed that the First Year of Studies would cease to operate as a separate college. Instead, he said advisors formerly from the First Year of Studies will now work with advisors from students’ majors. The core curriculum requirements will be spread over four years, rather than being concentrated in students’ first year. Additionally, students will now have the option to take courses for their major beginning their freshman year. Natalie Weber | The Observer John Affleck-Graces, executive vice president of Notre Dame, discusses reforms that the University is planning to implement in the final fall town hall held Wednesday evening held in Carey Auditorium.Burish said the changes will allow students to explore more majors by taking a variety of introductory courses during their first year. For those first year students who have already decided on a major, the new system will allow them to get a head start on their fields of study, Burish said.“You can start early, and if you made the wrong decision, you’ve got time to recover and get into another major because you have four years now to work these major decisions in,” he said.During the town hall, university administrators also announced an early retirement program for staff. Details regarding the program will be released in the next few weeks, executive vice president John Affleck-Graves said. “In essence, it will look very similar to the program we did in 2011,” he said. “Essentially, looking at people who are 62 years or older who have 10 years of service or people 55 years and older, with 15 years of service. And there will be some element of a lump sum payment that will be tied to the number of years you put in.”Staff members will have until March or April of next year to decide whether to retire early, Affleck-Graves said.The University is also implementing new recycling policies, Affleck-Graves said. In the past, recycling allowed for 10 percent contamination of materials.“Those rules have changed because the places that used to take the recycling materials will no longer take them,” Affleck-Graves said. “And so, the new rules are that we can only have a 0.5 to one percent contamination. So that’s going to change the way that we’re going to ask you to recycle.”Administrators are asking that members of the community follow the motto “When in doubt, throw it out.”“If you put that food contaminated, when you put a liquid in, you’ve destroyed the good that everybody else has done,” he said. “If everyone else is being rigorous in their recycling and you’re not, what they end up doing is condemning the entire lot.”During the town halls, administrators also provided information on construction projects across campus, including the demolition of McKenna Hall and Brownson Hall, the construction of a new art museum and updates on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II project.“If you’re worried about there not being enough construction on campus, you don’t have to worry,” Affleck-Graves said jokingly.McKenna Hall will be torn down and rebuilt on half of the current lot to match the building to current standards, Affleck-Graves said.“McKenna has served us well, but it’s not a very efficient space,” he said. “There’s lots of open space in it, and some of the rooms for meetings aren’t up to standards you typically get at conferences nowadays. So, we’ve had very generous benefactors who have given us the funds, so we will replace McKenna Hall.”Brownson Hall will also be torn down and the site will be used to create a new space for the Alliance for Catholic Education, Affleck-Graves said.Additionally, Affleck-Graves said construction on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II will be completed in approximately 18 months to two years. A new art museum, funded by Ernestine Raclin and her daughter and son-in-law Carmen and Chris Murphy, is also set to be constructed. Currently, administrators plan to build the museum at the site of the Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park. “Really, the long term dream of building this arts district on our campus really comes to fulfillment with an art museum, a sculpture park, school of architecture, performing arts, sacred music and the music library,” Affleck-Graves said. “So we’re really getting a beautiful area for the arts on campus.”During a town hall, Affleck-Graves also answered a question about whether Notre Dame’s food inspections would be kept private following its deal with St. Joseph County.“To me, it’s like filing our own taxes. … We were approached about that, we asked that they be kept private, for various reasons, as you know, that blew up in the press, so I think the agreement we have now, is that if we do them, we will make those public,” he said.University President Fr. John Jenkins also spoke at the town halls, addressing concerns about keeping Notre Dame financially accessible.“One challenge we have, and we all know it, a Notre Dame education for our students is extremely expensive,” he said. “It costs a lot of money, and we have to do everything we can to make a Notre Dame education affordable and make it effective. “To do that, we give financial aid as one of our top priorities, and we have to try to keep costs down. Because to the extent we are more efficient, we can accept more students, we can give them more financial aid, we can be more affordable, more accessible to our students.”Jenkins also addressed the sex abuse crisis facing the Catholic Church and encouraged staff members to report any concerns. Staff members can contact the University Integrity Line, Human Resources, Office of Institutional Equity or Audit and Advisory Services with any workplace concerns, Jenkins said.“If there is an issue, if there is a misconduct and if there is misbehavior, it allows us to investigate it professionally and adjudicate it correctly,” he said. “So let us have that opportunity — if you see something, say something.”Tags: Brownson Hall, Construction, Eddy Street Commons, Faculty Town Hall, fall town hall, First Year of Studies, McKenna Hall, recyclinglast_img read more


first_img Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too MuchYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid ArmageddonPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Great Entertainer Became A Milestone In The History Of CensorshipBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone Loading… Top seed and three-time US Open winner Djokovic – who has won five of the past seven Grand Slam crowns – has 17 slams, behind Nadal on 19 and Federer on 20.Also on Ashe Monday is top-seeded woman Karolina Pliskova, who goes up against 145th ranked Anhelina Kalinina of Ukraine.Two-time Grand Slam winner Naomi Osaka is scheduled to play as well, but her status is in doubt due to a left hamstring injury that forced her to pull out of Saturday’s WTA New York final.Read Also: Platini questioned in Swiss probe of $2m FIFA paymentSerena Williams starts her bid for a 24th career Grand Slam women’s singles crown to match the all-time record set by Margaret Court on Tuesday.Women’s number one Ashleigh Barty and reigning champion Bianca Andreescu are among high-profile women skipping the event because of concerns about coronavirus.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Top favourite Novak Djokovic begins his quest for an 18th Grand Slam title on Monday as a unique, spectator-free 2020 US Open gets underway in a COVID-19 quarantine bubble at Flushing Meadows. The world number one headlines the opening day of a tennis major that promises to be unlike any other and which is missing several top players due to coronavirus fears. Djokovic takes on unheralded Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia-Herzegovina in a round-one evening match at an Arthur Ashe Stadium that in normal years buzzes with 23,000 screaming fans. But due to strict measures aimed at keeping COVID-19 out of the US National Tennis Center, only players, officials and a handful of media will be watching in-person this year. “It is strange to see,” said Djokovic, crediting his love of playing on the New York hardcourts to Ashe, which he described as “the most dynamic and explosive court” in the game. “The circumstances are very unusual but we have to deal with it and try to embrace it,” the Serbian superstar added. The US Open marks the first Grand Slam of the coronavirus era, and the first since the Australian Open in January and February, after the global pandemic wiped out much of the season, including Wimbledon. Players are being kept in a tightly controlled environment to minimize the risk of infection and are being tested for coronavirus regularly throughout the tournament. The men’s draw was disrupted on the eve of the tournament Sunday when France’s Benoit Paire was removed after organizers announced that an unidentified player had been withdrawn after testing positive for COVID-19.center_img Under New York state rules, any player that tests positive is immediately withdrawn and must self-isolate for at least 10 days. Most competitors are staying at specific hotels and are not allowed to travel anywhere other than to and from the tournament site and their accommodation. Some players, including Djokovic, have rented private houses that must be guarded 24 hours by security to safeguard the quarantine bubble. Parts of the tennis center grounds were turned into makeshift hospital rooms during the worst of the pandemic in New York in April. Intense cleaning and safety protocols were put in place before the US Open allowed players into the bubble. And the number of support personnel for each competitor is limited, as is the number of players allowed into the locker room at any one time. Players are advised to wear masks when they are not on court and must wash their hands regularly. The absence of defending champion Rafael Nadal and Swiss legend Roger Federer gives Djokovic a prime opportunity to gain ground on his rivals in the chase for the all-time men’s Grand Slam singles title record. The participation of Japan’s Naomi Osaka at the 2020 US Open is in doubt because of injurylast_img read more


first_imgR Ashwin leaves training session after sustaining hand injury Ravichandran Ashwin was hit by a cricket ball during the morningsession on the final day of Team India’s preparatory camp in Bengaluru. Kohli and Co. fail one hour batting test at preparatory campThe India Test squad, ahead of the West Indies tour, was put to test in a Test cricket simulation exercise in which the Indian batsmen faced three pacers and three spinners each in their one hour session.Sai Praneeth, Manu Attri-Sumeeth Reddy pair win Canada Open badminton titles23-year-old Hyderabad shuttler Sai Praneeth made light work of his Koreanopponent Lee Hyun II 21-12, 21-10 on Sunday to win Canada Open 2016.Euro 2016: France eye Germany after ending Iceland’s dream The French team is wary about World Champions Germany threat but are geared up to write a new chapter in its football history.Man City manager Guardiola dismisses chances of signing MessiNewly-appointed Manchester City manager, who addressed a fan meet atEtihad Stadium, said Lionel Messi had to stay in Barcelona for the restof his career.last_img read more