first_imgFormer Director of the Guyana National Service, Retired Colonel Desmond Roberts has been sworn in as the lone Commissioner for an Inquiry into the treatment of retired members of the armed services.Colonel Roberts took his oath as Commissioner before Magistrate Judy Latchman and Minister of State, Joseph Harmon in Court Three of the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Monday.Retired Colonel Desmond Roberts, Magistrate Judy Latchman and Minister of State, Joseph Harmon at the swearing inThis latest Commission of Inquiry (CoI) will seek to examine, advise and report on the conditions and circumstances facing armed services veterans, including those from the Guyana Defence Force (GDF); Guyana People’s Militia and the Guyana National Service. The public hearings will be held at the Ministry of the Presidency’s Department of Public Service, Waterloo Street.Colonel Roberts suggested that his experience in various levels of military administration has made him suitable for the post.“I’ve been a senior officer of the military. I’ve worked with the Guyana Youth Corps [and] I think administration is very important thing,” the retired army officer noted.He also related that many of the retired armed services members have skills that can be passed on.“Many veterans have skills that are actually quantifiable but are sometimes not transferrable, there is no reason why those things cannot come into civilian life, [but] we have to try to also get some equivalency to make sure that military skills could transfer.”Meanwhile, responding to questions on what Government hopes to achieve from this CoI, Minister Harmon expressed that Government would seek to implement the recommendations.“There would be some clear recommendations as to how Government should act…what institutions should be set up to ensure that veterans are given a fair share and that they are being dealt with in a fair and just manner,” Harmon further explained.Over the next two weeks, the Commission will compile its preliminary report and gather witnesses. About 60 witnesses are expected to testify from various regions across the country. These include the present and former Army Chief-of-Staff and Retired Major General and Private Sector Commission Chairman, Norman Mc Lean. Colonel Denzil Carmichael will serve as the Commission’s secretary.last_img read more


first_imgAlex Pritchard’s free-kick put Brentford within sight of the Championship play-offs.The Tottenham loanee’s 26th-minute shot from just outside the box took a deflection off the wall and spun past the dive of Wigan keeper Lee Nicholls.With Derby losing at home to Reading at the break, Brentford sit in the top six with 45 minutes of the season remaining.A timid Brentford initially looked overawed by what they might be able to achieve and Pritchard’s goal came from their first serious effort on target.Wigan, already relegated, looked relaxed in contrast and Marc-Antoine Fortune blasted an early shot at Bees keeper David Button.At the other end, Pritchard saw a tame effort comfortably gathered by Nicholls, while Button likewise easily fielded Gaetan Bong’s low shot.Either side of his goal, the excellent Pritchard was also denied by sliding blocks from Wigan defender Jason Pearce, while just before the break Andre Gray narrowly failed to apply a touch at the far post to Pritchard’s teasing delivery.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I hunted with a cat the other evening. I was after deer while the feline was stalking smaller mammals as I watched it undetected from my treestand above its perch. We shared a small swamp flanked by harvested bean and corn fields and accessed by narrow, overgrown fencerows connecting to wood lots. The farmer had left some standing corn and beans in the corners and around a wind-fallen ash tree, and the bonus grain and cover was a magnet to the local game, both feathered and furred.I know fellows who say they shoot feral cats when they see them in the field, taking care to target felines that are far from any farmhouse where they might double as pets. The argument is that the cats have gone native and, with no natural predators, ravage local game- and song-bird populations. You may have read about some recent studies done on the subject. I did, and have invited one feral cat expert on to my show next month to learn more about the issue. I’ll welcome Matt Clayton to Buckeye Sportsman on the Dec. 9 broadcast.I watched that cat as it crept up to the end of a branch off a fallen tree, settling in from that higher vantage point much the way I had in my stand 17 feet above. While I had the benefit of head to toe woodland camouflage to blend in with our shared surroundings, the feline had an unfortunate coloration: pure white but for a tail ringed like a raccoon and a pair of grown eye patches. You could see the stark-white predator working its way through the brush and stalks from clear across the field. The poor cat’s unnatural camo couldn’t be worse, I thought, then shuddered with a blast of the north wind that found its way down the back of my neck. That’s when it occurred to me that when the snow flies and living off the land is at its leanest, that cat’s coat will fit right in when it needs it the most. I wished the feline luck as it eventually padded off into a thick clump of timothy, and I sat shivering ‘til dark waiting for game that never showed. Waterfowl IDSpeaking of hunting, with waterfowl seasons in full swing across the state as Ohio’s duck and goose seasons begin, hunters are encouraged to familiarize themselves with waterfowl identification before heading out. Ohio waterfowl hunters frequently encounter a variety of species of birds when in the field and marsh, and some species of ducks, geese and swans may look similar.Some species, like the state-threatened trumpeter swans and occasionally migrating tundra swans, are protected and may be encountered. Although waterfowl hunters in Ohio rarely encounter snow geese, hunters should still be able to distinguish between swans and snow geese. With proper species identification and attention, there should be little confusion between the species. Trumpeter swan (threatened and protected species)• Mature birds have pure-white plumage (sometime stained heads) and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4 to 5 feet with a wingspan of 7 feet and weight of 17 to 28 pounds. Tundra swan (protected species)• Mature birds have pure- white plumage and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4.5 feet with a wingspan of 5.5 feet and weight of 8 to 23 pounds. Canada goose (legal game species)• Black-necked plumage with chin strap, black head, tan breast, brown back, long necks• Length of 2.5 to 3.5 feet with a wingspan of 4 to 5.5 feet, and weight of 6.5 to 20 pounds. Snow goose (legal game species)• White with black wing tips, short necks relative to the body size• Length of 2.5 feet with a wingspan of 4.5 feet and weight 3.5 to 7 pounds.For more information about waterfowl hunting in Ohio visit wildohio.gov.last_img read more


first_img Failure to immunise may result in public health issues for the country. Parents can be charged under the law for failure to adequately immunise their children. Story Highlights The Ministry of Health (MoH) has renewed its appeal for parents and guardians to get their children immunised.Speaking at a recent Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank, Director of Family Health Services in the Ministry, Dr. Karen Lewis-Bell, reminded parents that they could be charged under the law for failure to adequately immunise their children.She said that under the 1986 Public Health Act, parents, principals and owners of day care facilities and health care workers, who contribute or cause a child to not be adequately vaccinated for his age, outside of medical contra-indications, are liable for prosecution in a Resident Magistrates Court. They can be fined and/or given a term of imprisonment for up to 30 days.In addition to the legal ramifications, Dr. Bell said failure to immunise may result in public health issues for the country.While Jamaica has eradicated a number of diseases, this is not the case for every country and so there is the risk that these conditions could be re-introduced to the island through travel.“Occasionally, we have tourists from countries that do not have an established immunisation programme, those in which it is not mandated, and even from countries where certain diseases are still endemic. This sometimes results in imported cases of polio, measles or other non-immunisation-related diseases,” Dr. Bell pointed out.She said that “young parents in particular, are not familiar with some diseases that affect children if they are not immunised and so they are more fearful of the vaccines and the minor side effects associated with the vaccines, rather than the disease itself.”Dr. Bell explained that it is very difficult for the health sector to stop importation of diseases because many of these conditions have an incubation period, which sometimes lasts between seven to 21 days. During this period, she said, the person is infected but has not yet started to show signs and symptoms of the disease.“These persons appear healthy upon entering the country and later visits health care facilities for treatment and that is when the Ministry of Health’s active surveillance system identifies the imported disease. In this system, health care providers search mainly hospitals for these cases on a daily and sometimes weekly basis,” she informed.Dr. Bell said that the Government has an obligation to protect the welfare of the nation from these conditions, despite the philosophical and religious belief of the individual.“When it concerns the health and well-being of the nation, it is the responsibility of the Government to consider the well-being of the wider population and act accordingly,” she stated.With the availability of relatively cheap and safe vaccines for several diseases, the Director of Family Health Services said that children should not have to battle with certain diseases and in some cases die. The Government has an obligation to protect the welfare of the nation from these conditions.last_img read more