first_imgMountain climber Ross Miller in action.RESPECTED Brisbane mountain climber Annette Miller sold her family home at auction on Saturday, nine years after losing her husband in a mountain climbing tragedy at Mt Lindesay on the Queensland/New South Wales border.25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi.Mrs Miller was the first woman to climb Mt Tinbeerwah near Noosa on the Sunshine Coast and her husband Ross Miller was a professional rock climber with more than 20 years’ experience.Annette Miller at the auction of her Tarragindi home of 25 years.“Mountain climbing is about being out in nature, you forget everything except that square metre of rock in front of you and above you and it’s the challenge of whether you can ‘work the rock’,” Mrs Miller said.“And to do it with someone, like a soulmate or even a good friend, it’s an amazing experience because you’re both dependent on each other and your life is quite literally in the other person’s hands, there’s a lot of trust involved.”25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi is also 46 O’Neil Street, Moorooka as it has a two-street frontage and is positioned at the boundary of two suburbs.Their four-bedroom, architect-designed home at 25 Tamarang Street, Tarragindi is on a 45 degree slope next to Toohey Forest Park and is packed with memories from a lifetime of hiking and climbing together.“It’s taken me a long time to get to this point where I felt I could let go of the house,” Mrs Miller said. “Ross and I pretty much had our whole relationship here … he did all the gardening and he also built the rock climbing wall downstairs,” she said.Great views from the deck.Place Graceville agent Karen Simons took the 1980s-built, three-level home to auction with two active bidders but a vendor bid of $850,000 was needed to break the ice.Architect Leon Burton raised the bid to $900,000 and after a short volley of bids the house sold to Mr Burton for $1.075m.“There’s not that classic street appeal but internally, it’s like a chalet,” Mr Burton said of the 1499sq m property.Built like a Swiss Chalet.“We’re not quite as adventurous as (Ross Miller) was but we are very active and we love bushwalking and we did notice the rock climbing wall. We might set that up.”More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours agoParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoMrs Miller has continued hiking and will travel to the Scenic Rim on the school holidays to be the Girraween National Park camp host.“You meet and greet campers and give them advice on where to go through the national parks,” she said.Annette and Ross met in 1990 while on a three day hike near Cunningham’s Gap in 1990.Their outdoor interests expanded to include cycling, skiing, rogaining, mountaineering and rock climbing.Their honeymoon in 1996 was a 20-day bushwalk in the spectacular West McDonnell Ranges in the Northern Territory, including the world-famous Larapinta Trail.The Larapinta Trail in Central Australia.FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more


first_imgØrsted has joined a GBP 400,000 sea state forecasting project, launched by UK’s national Operations & Maintenance (O&M) Centre of Excellence, a collaboration between the University of Hull and the Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult. “This big-marine-data approach, along with bathymetry and site configuration data, is enabling researchers to produce an artificial intelligence-based method that will be used to make a step-change in the resolution and accuracy of fine-scale at offshore windfarm sites”, ORE Catapult said. Downward-facing radars have been installed on wind turbines turbines at Ørsted’s 258 MW Burbo Bank Extension offshore wind farm. The radars will record wave height, direction and period, together with combined met-ocean data and existing forecasts. The project’s goal is to deliver a significant reduction in missed working days by developing an innovative approach to sea state forecasting. By improving wave forecast modelling, the project team aims to contribute to increasing the accuracy of sea state forecasting at the level of an individual offshore wind turbine. This should drive efficiency gains in operations and maintenance, increase safety, and contribute to further reductions in the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCoE) for offshore wind, according to ORE Catapult. “With total O&M costs contributing around 25% to the lifetime costs of a typical offshore wind farm, the positive impact on planning by owners/operators is clear, with ORE Catapult analysis suggesting that innovations in forecasting techniques could help to reduce missed working days by a quarter”, ORE Catapult states.last_img read more