first_imgTAROUBA, Trinidad (CMC) – Unbeaten Trinbago Knight Riders swept into tomorrow’s final of the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) after ruthlessly disposing of an erratic Jamaica Tallawahs by nine wickets in the first semi-final here yesterday.Akeal Hosein laid the platform for TKR’s 11th straight win when he snatched three for 14 with his left-arm spin to restrict Tallawahs to a meagre 107 for seven off their 20 overs.Opener Lendl Simmons then stroked an unbeaten 54 and Tion Webster, 44 not out, as TKR chased down their target with five overs left.“Getting this far now is about the big picture which is on tomorrow; so for us, we still have to try and keep it level,” TKR captain Kieron Pollard said afterwards.“We still have to try and enjoy our victory as we’ve been doing throughout the tournament but we still have to come in 48 hours and try to play a better game of cricket than we did today.”Sent in, Tallawahs lost Jermaine Blackwood to the fourth ball of the match without a run on the board, bowled by Hosein, as he missed a wild heave and when Glenn Phillips steered left-arm spinner Khary Pierre (2-29) to point in the next over, the innings was already in crisis at two for two.Hosein then quickly knocked over the promoted Mujeeb-ur-Rahman (0) and Asif Ali (4) to leave Tallawahs tottering on 25 for four before Nkrumah Bonner top-scored with 41 and captain Rovman Powell chipped in with 33, to salvage pride for their side.Bonner struck five fours in a 42-ball knock while Powell counted a four and a six off 35 deliveries, as the pair combined in a 38-run fifth wicket stand.Leg-spinner Fawad Ahmed broke the stand in the 12th over when he got Bonner to play on at 63 for five and with five runs added, Tallawahs suffered a game-changing blow when Andre Russell was controversially given out by umpire Nigel Duguid, caught at slip for two off off-spinner Sunil Narine.A clearly upset Russell remonstrated angrily before storming off and TV replays confirmed the player’s reaction, showing the ball clearly striking only the pad before ballooning to Dwayne Bravo.With their talisman gone, Tallawahs’ hopes of a competitive total also disappeared and it was left to Powell and Carlos Brathwaite (13 not out) to add 24 for the seventh wicket, before Powell holed out to deep mid-off off Pierre at the end of the 18th over.“We lost four wickets in the power-play and the stats show when you lose four wickets in the power-play you usually end on a (losing) note,” Powell lamented.“There was a lot of inconsistency. The batters didn’t stand up all season and we asked our international batters to bat most of the overs and we just didn’t do that.”The target was never going to seriously test TKR but when off-spinner Mujeeb bowled Narine for four in the second over with 14 runs on the board, Tallawahs began to dream.However, Simmons and Webster hastily dashed those hopes in a rollicking 97-run, unbroken second-wicket stand.Simmons faced 44 balls and struck half-dozen fours and two sixes while Webster’s 43-ball knock was laced with one six and half-a-dozen fours – the last two of which propelled TKR past their target.last_img read more


first_imgWith just eight regular season games remaining, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team finds itself perched at No. 3 in the rankings and No. 2 in the WCHA standings, hoping to ride out the season on a hot streak.This weekend’s away series against Minnesota State comes after the Badgers’ convincing series win against defending national champions Clarkson University. Sophomore forward Sydney McKibbon said the team is now looking to win the eight games left in the season.“In-conference or out-of-conference, we want to get eight wins,” McKibbon said. “We want to move into the playoffs on a high note.”Regardless of their opponent, the Badgers are expressing confidence in their abilities, despite a recent stretch of goal-scoring troubles. However, if the team continues the form they exhibited in a 4-0 thumping of seventh-ranked Clarkson on Sunday, this should be no problem.“What we’re doing right now has been working pretty well,” sophomore forward Sarah Nurse said. “With our team, I think it’s pretty deep. Anybody can score.”Granted, freshman forward Annie Pankowski scored three of Wisconsin’s four goals on Sunday, but the principle remains that the Badgers are quite capable of tallying goals. After their last game, the team hopes the rough patch the team hit coming out of the winter break might finally be over.“On Sunday, we were finally able to put the puck in the net,” McKibbon said. “We want to continue to do that, continue to pepper the goalies. It gets frustrating when you’re getting 50 shots on net and you’re not scoring … but it makes us want to score even more and get pucks to the net.”In its last five games before the Clarkson series, Wisconsin had netted only six goals.From the Jan. 10th game vs. Minnesota through Sunday’s game vs. Clarkson, the Badgers’ offense was subpar. Through the six games, the Badgers shot, on average, 11.84 in the first period of games, 14.84 in the second and 11.5 in the third. Those shots translated into, on average, 0.17 goals in the first period, one in the second and 0.4 in the third.However, in Sunday’s game vs. Clarkson alone, the Badgers shot 14 first period shots, 15 second period shots and fell to only nine third period shots. This resulted in zero first period goals, two second period goals and two third period goals.Finding their stride again could not have come at a more convenient time, as the Badgers will face some key matchups in determining their final place for the upcoming WCHA and NCAA tournaments.  The WCHA begins in about one month.Among the teams contesting Wisconsin on their march toward the finish are Minnesota-Duluth, who will look to spoil the Badgers’ plans. The Bulldogs find themselves four points behind the Badgers in the WCHA conference standings. Two wins against Wisconsin next week would put the Bulldogs even with the Badgers.Yet the Badgers only concern themselves with the tasks at hand in preparation for this weekend’s series. Minnesota State currently sits at the bottom of the WCHA standings without a single win in conference play at 0-17-1. Regardless, the Badgers are aware that the Mavericks will look to end their campaign on a high note by taking down the third-ranked team in the nation.“I think whenever a team plays us, they get excited,” Nurse said. “So finishing out this last half of the season, we’re looking to not give any teams hope against us.”No player denies the challenges ahead, but all seem to be exhibiting the classic phrase, “cool, calm and collected,” and rightfully so. Despite recent goal troubles, the Badgers are still in excellent position to make a run at what would be head coach Mark Johnson’s fifth national title.Rebounding after their recent string of troubles has given the team the hunger and energy it needs in order to keep the momentum going. In fact, some players believe it was actually beneficial. It showed what can happen in moments of complacency and, in turn, reignited the fire that led them to a 17-2-1 record going into the winter break.“You need to stay humble,” freshman defender Maddie Rolfes said. “You need to make sure your main goals are working hard and winning instead of going out complacent and getting into bad habits.”With two series at home, Minnesota-Duluth and St. Cloud State, and two away series at Minnesota State and Ohio State, the Badgers will play in a variety of environments that will prepare them for the upcoming postseason tournaments.  The team also hopes to bring home a coveted fifth national title for Johnson, the newest member of the 350-win club.last_img read more


first_imgOne of the more daunting challenges that is tethered to expansion is maintaining your infrastructure and performance as you grow.When you’re scaling a business, things can quickly get derailed. Your sales process may not easily translate to a larger platform. Perhaps your employees aren’t prepared to work in an expanding arena. Whatever the case is, it’s your duty to keep goals aligned.A meeting, whether daily, weekly or monthly, is an excellent tool to get everybody synchronized. Just by having the meeting serve as an anchor for the work being performed, your employees can stay close to their goals.Another benefit of meetings is that they give you an opportunity to recognize employee development and achievement. When your employees are performing, reward them. When they get off of the course, bring them back. And this is possible through regularly scheduled meetings. For more information on motivating your organization, watch the video featuring Rich Chiarello.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more