first_imgThis time last year Letterkenny won the overall title of Ireland’s Most Enterprising Town.Along with the trophies came a small prize fund.Letterkenny Chamber had long discussions with the other stakeholders and after much deliberation it has decided to put some of the money towards the development of the market Square. Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce is promoting a comprehensive review of how the Market Square works as a public space and the potential use of this focal point on Main Street into the future.With the help of Donegal County Council and students from Queens University Belfast the views of people using Main Street will be sought during a day-long consultation event on Friday 6th December.Leonard Watson, President of Letterkenny Chamber explained “The Market Square when it was built was the jewel in the crown of Letterkenny Town Centre, however, over the years it has become clear that the space is not as accessible or suitable for events as was first thought. We have all stood at the square and had conversations about it.“As a Chamber we have organized events and have tried to use the band stand for various activities, but we realized we needed to be closer to the street. So, we thought this consultation fitted well with these ongoing conversations.” Individuals will be able to discuss their ideas and help inform the future use and layout of the Square as a space with potential to be used in any number of ways.The next stage, informed by comments gathered during the consultation day, is to commission a Design Competition funded by Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce from which detailed plans can be developed as the basis to implement the redevelopment of the Market Square should funding opportunities become available.This will be an on-street event taking place from 10am to 4.30pm.  Those carrying out the consultation will be located at Market Centre so call down and give your opinion.All views and opinions on the future visions for the Square are welcome and will be reflected in the design brief for the proposed design competition.Come and join us in shaping the future of this important place. Come and share your vision for Letterkenny’s Market Square this Friday was last modified: December 3rd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ConsultationdonegalletterkennyMarket Squarelast_img read more


first_imgQPR’s Massimo Luongo hit the woodwork twice in the first half of the derby at Griffin Park.Luongo headed Matt Phillips’ left-wing cross against the upright and went close again when his right-footed shot from the near the left-hand edge of the penalty area beat keeper David Button and struck the par post.Earlier, Tjaronn Chery had had a decent chance for the visitors and John Swift went close for Brentford.Chery sneaked behind Bees defender Harlee Dean to collect Daniel Tozser’s pass but the Dutchman’s attempted chip was well off target.On-loan Chelsea youngster Swift then tested Rob Green with a curling effort the Rangers keeper was able to gather.Brentford: Button; Yennaris; Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; McCormack, Diagouraga, Woods, Swift, Judge; Djuricin.Subs: Bonham, Hofmann, Kerschbaumer, Vibe, O’Connell, Gogia, Canos.QPR: Green; Onuoha, Hall, Hill, Konchesky; Henry, Tozser; Phillips, Luongo, Chery; Emmanuel-Thomas.Subs: Smithies, Austin, Doughty, Faurlin, Hoilett, Perch, Polter.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material 8 June 2009 With just over a year to go to the kickoff of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in South Africa’s Eastern Cape province has become the first built-from-scratch stadium to be officially opened for the tournament. “For us, today’s first opening of a newly built 2010 Fifa World Cup stadium is a huge boost,” 2010 Organising Committee South Africa (OC) chief executive officer Danny Jordaan said at a “people’s opening” ceremony attended by 25 000 residents of Port Elizabeth on Sunday. “With the four stadiums about to host the Fifa Confederations Cup ready, this brings to five the number of 2010 Fifa World Cup stadiums now complete a year to go before the event,” Jordaan said. “And all the other five new arenas are also shaping up nicely to be ready well ahead of the event.” Eight games, including a third and fourth place playoff and a quarterfinal, will take place at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Nelson Mandela Bay/Port Elizabeth, which will seat 48 000 fans during next year’s tournament. The stadium will host its first competitive game on 16 June when the touring British and Irish Lions rugby team play a local Southern Kings Invitational side. Jordaan praised the Nelson Mandela Bay municipality, saying the it was a “tribute to their project management capability, the construction company and the workers that they managed to complete the stadium in record time. “It demonstrates the capacity of South Africa’s construction industry and our commitment to deliver on all our 2010 Fifa World Cup promises.” Nelson Mandela Bay deputy executive mayor Bicks Ndoni said the public opening gave residents the chance to see first-hand the stadium’s “state-of-the-art facilities, experience its beauty, warmth and uniqueness, anda bask in the glory and pride of knowing that we are the joint owners of a truly world-class facility”. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more


first_imgWood is a renewable fuel and, assuming that new trees grow up to replace those cut for firewood, it is carbon-neutral, meaning that it doesn’t have a net contribution to global warming. That said, wood burning also churns out a lot of air pollutants, some of which are highly visible as smoke. Fortunately, there’s a lot we can do to reduce the pollution generated by wood burning—and boost the efficiency.Our discussion here focuses mostly on wood stoves; pellet stoves and larger central-heating wood boilers will be covered in future columns. Fireplaces, for the most part, shouldn’t be thought of as heating systems. They are aesthetic features that can add wonderful ambiance on special occasions—we use ours two or three times a year. But fireplaces burn very inefficiently, and they result in so much airflow up through the chimney that they can actually cause a net loss of energy. Cold air leaks into the house to replace all the room air going up the chimney, and this forces your central heating system to work harder.Burning wood cleanly and efficiently depends on three primary factors: the choice of wood stove; how the wood is stored and managed; and operation of the stove.Choosing a Clean-Burning, Efficient Wood StoveThe starting point in clean, efficient wood stove operation is the selection of the stove. Since July 1, 1990, all new wood stoves sold in the U.S. have been required to carry U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification. (The 1988 law banned the manufacturing of non-EPA-compliant wood stoves after July 1, 1988 and the sale of such stoves two years later.) The EPA standard for non-catalytic wood stoves is 7.5 grams per hour of emissions and for catalytic wood stoves 4.1 grams per hour. By comparison, older, non-certified wood stoves typically produce 40 to 60 grams per hour of pollution, according the EPA.Instituting stringent air pollution standards for wood stoves was a bold and controversial move by the federal government. It put over 80% of wood stove manufacturers out of business because it was too expensive for smaller companies to change their designs. But it also dramatically reduced pollution from wood stoves and boosted combustion efficiency—reducing air pollution by as much as 85%.Manufacturers achieved these improvements by significantly redesigning wood stoves—for example by insulating the firebox, adding baffles that lengthened the smoke path through the stove resulting in more complete combustion, and providing air-inlet holes above the combustion chamber to preheat combustion air. The new-generation, non-catalytic Vermont Castings Defiant NC 1610 and Encore NC 1450 wood stoves are the cleanest-burning models available, with EPA emissions ratings of less than 1 gram per hour, but all new wood stoves are far cleaner than their ancestors from two decades ago.Properly Seasoning FirewoodThe single most important factor for clean, efficient wood burning is using only dry wood. Wood should be seasoned at least six months off the ground and under cover after it is cut and split. Properly seasoned wood is usually deeply checked (checks are end-grain cracks that form as wood dries) and makes a hollow sound when two pieces are knocked together. If the moisture content of wood is high, that water evaporates as the wood is burned, which keeps the combustion temperature low. Even the most advanced wood stove will generate a lot of pollution and burn less efficiently if green (unseasoned) wood is used in it.The six months’ drying of firewood should be considered a minimum. Ideally, several years’ worth of firewood should be kept on hand, with the oldest burned first. One way of organizing this is by stacking green wood outdoors, and then after a season or two moving a heating-season’s worth of wood into a fully covered shed, from which a supply is brought into the house as needed. Green wood should not be stored indoors because of the significant amount of moisture that it will introduce to the house.In splitting firewood, keep the diameter of the split logs relatively small, especially for smaller wood stoves, so that there will be a lot of surface area during combustion. Smaller logs will also dry out more quickly.Operating Wood Stoves EfficientlyTo achieve optimal performance of a wood stove, it should be operated hot. Start the wood stove with crumpled newspaper and kindling. As the fire burns down, rake the coals toward the front or side of the stove, creating a mound (rather than spreading them out), and add several logs at the same time. In milder weather, build smaller fires, but still operate the stove hot, rather than keeping a large fire going and damping it down (restricting the air inlet). Regularly remove ashes so that air flow in the firebox is not impeded and there is plenty of room for wood.Fortunately, there’s an easy way to tell how cleanly (and efficiently) you’re burning your wood stove: the smoke coming out of your chimney. If you generate lots of smoke, the combustion isn’t very complete and a lot of particulate (and other) pollution is being created. This may occur if the wood isn’t very dry, as noted above. A lot of smoke may also indicate that you’re not bringing enough combustion air into your wood stove—most wood stove have an air inlet control. If unsure about proper operation of your wood stove for optimal performance, consult with the company you bought it from or a chimney cleaning service.To minimize pollution, never burn household trash, any manufactured or painted wood (including plywood and particleboard), or pressure-treated wood—burning any of these materials is illegal in Vermont.Also avoid moldy or rotten wood and even driftwood (the salt may corrode the stove and stovepipe or result in toxic emissions).For both safety and efficient operation, have the chimney or stovepipe cleaned at least annually. Build-up of soot can restrict the chimney draft and diminish stove performance. For safety, install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and make sure they are functioning properly. Replace batteries on battery-powered detectors at least annually, or whenever the low-battery alert sounds.last_img read more