first_imgIn the “well, I guess it could be worse” department, Kevin Peterson is out for two weeks after undergoing knee surgery. He’s supposed to be back for the opener on September 3 against Central Michigan.“They took him in and did a scope on him,” Mike Gundy told the Tulsa World. “(Team doctors) weren’t sure if they needed to or not, but they decided to go ahead and do it. He’ll be out for a couple of weeks. We’ll bring him back at kind of a slow pace.”No injury is good, but if you’re going to have one, a Kevin Peterson two-week knee scope on August 10 is about as nice as it gets. In fact, I don’t even care if he’s back for Central Michigan as long as he’s ready to roll on September 26 in Austin.OSU is deep at corner — maybe deeper there than any other position on the field. It’s an injury that will be easy to absorb and, as Gundy mentioned, actually kind of nice for some guys to get some extra work.Jordan Burton was also mildly injured for Monday’s practice.#okstate LB Jordan Burton sidelined today. Sore hip, Gundy explained.— Bill Haisten ?? (@billhaisten) August 10, 2015 If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more


first_imgA lengthy article detailing new allegations of sexual assault against film director Bryan Singer—originally planned for publication in Esquire after a year-long investigation—landed at The Atlantic on Wednesday after being killed by Hearst executives, according to the two Esquire staffers who investigated and wrote the story.“We have been asked why a story reported and written by two Esquire writers is being published in The Atlantic,” read a statement from Esquire editor-at-large Maximillian Potter and writer-at-large Alex French that was posted on The Atlantic PR team’s Twitter account Wednesday afternoon.“This story began with our editors at Esquire. After months of reporting, the story went through Esquire‘s editorial process, which included fact-checking and vetting by a Hearst attorney, and the story was approved for publication. The story was then killed by Hearst executives. We do not know why.”“We feel fortunate that The Atlantic decided to work for us,” the statement continues, “and we are grateful that the piece has gone through The Atlantic‘s thoughtful editorial process, which included another rigorous fact-check and robust legal vetting. We are most grateful that the alleged victims now have a change to be heard and we hope the substance of their allegations remains in focus.”Reps for Hearst Magazines and Esquire have not responded to requests for comment. Observers were quick to draw parallels to Ronan Farrow’s assertion that NBC News executives had punted his investigation into Harvey Weinstein’s history of sexual assault and harassment (which Farrow eventually brought to The New Yorker), an assertion that NBC has repeatedly denied.“The last time I posted about this subject, Esquire magazine was preparing to publish an article written by a homophobic journalist who has a bizarre obsession with me dating back to 1997,” read Wednesday’s statement from Singer in response to The Atlantic‘s story, which stems from a 12-month investigation and cites 50 sources, including detailed accounts from four accusers. “After careful fact-checking and, in consideration of the lack of credible sources, Esquire chose not to publish this piece of vendetta journalism. That didn’t stop this writer from selling it to The Atlantic. It’s sad that The Atlantic would stoop to this low standard of journalistic integrity.”Singer’s statement Wednesday—which followed an earlier, preemptive denial issued on Instagram in October—went on to dismiss the article as a “homophobic smear piece.”“The writers spent 12 months investigating various lawsuits and allegations against Singer,” Anna Bross, The Atlantic’s senior director of communications, tells Folio:. “This article has been thoroughly reported, sourced, researched, and fact-checked. We have full confidence in this reporting and in our publication of this investigation.”This is a developing story.last_img read more


first_imgBangalore-based pharmaceutical company Biocon on Thursday reported its result for the first quarter of the financial year 2016-17. The firm’s net profit rose 35 percent to Rs. 166.6 crore as compared to Rs. 123.9 crore during the same quarter in the last financial year, the company said in its regulatory filing to the Bombay Stock Exchange. Biocon’s consolidated net revenues for the June quarter rose 21 percent to Rs. 982 crore as compared to Rs. 813.9 crore during the same time in the previous fiscal. “Our strong performance this quarter has been driven by an all-round growth of our business across small molecules, biologics, branded formulations and research services,” Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, the Chairperson and Managing Director of Biocon, said. Biocon’s Biologics business delivered a growth of 53 percent, which was driven by the sales of Biosimilars in emerging markets. The company’s insulin business also got a boost with the launch of its Insulin Glargine in Japan.Biocon has received regulatory approvals from the ministry of health, Malaysia, for rh-Insulin and Glargine, which would enable commercialisation of these products.”We are on track for filing some of our Biosimilars and Generic Formulations in the developed market later this year,” Shaw added.The company’s net sales for the quarter that ended on June 30 was recorded at Rs. 972 crore as against Rs. 757 crore during the corresponding quarter in the previous fiscal.The Biocon Limited stock was trading at Rs. 745.10 at around 10:18 a.m. on Friday, up 6.22 percent from its previous close on the BSE.last_img read more


first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneFormer state Senator and gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis speaks to Planned Parenthood supporters at the Capitol in Austin on April 5, 2017.Almost four years after Democrat Wendy Davis’ failed bid for governor, the Texas Ethics Commission has fined her campaign and Battleground Texas for delayed reporting of $3.4 million in political contributions.Neither the campaign nor the political organization admitted doing anything wrong, and the commission conceded the situation “is not explicitly addressed by Texas law.” Nevertheless, the Davis campaign and Battleground Texas each agreed to pay a $3,000 fine.In separate orders from the commission posted Tuesday (here and here), both Davis, on behalf of her gubernatorial campaign, and Battleground Texas, a group that launched in 2013 to help elect Democrats, said they had not “violated any provision of the Election Code and at all times properly reported all of its activities in a manner that is transparent and open to the public. However, for the sake of resolving this matter, without further proceedings, the respondent accepts the Commission’s proposal of resolution without any admission of wrongdoing of any kind.”Working together in the 2014 campaign, the groups employed an unusual fundraising arrangement, collecting political contributions through the “Texas Victory Committee — a Joint Project of Wendy Davis for Governor Inc and Battle Ground Texas.” That outfit — TVC — split its spending and its proceeds evenly between Davis and Battleground.During the second half of 2013, Davis and Battleground hosted “at least eight joint fundraisers,” the commission said in its orders. TVC reported those contributions and the fundraising costs in its January 2014 report. But it didn’t transfer those contributions to Davis and Battleground until March of that year.Both reported the transfers in their July 2014 reports.The commission said the contributions should have been reported six months earlier, when the donors’ checks were cashed. “The effective control over TVC and the donor’s intent support the finding that Battleground and Davis PAC constructively accepted the funds when received by TVC,” the commission said in its orders. As a result, it said, each got “about $1.7 million” that should have been reported in January and wasn’t reported for six more months.It caused a fair amount of confusion during the campaign, creating the impression for some that donors had given twice as much as they had since their contributions showed up under their names in the TVC report in January 2014 and then again in the Battleground and Davis reports in July 2014.That said, the commission said the reports filed by the two “evinced a good-faith attempt by the respondent to comply with Texas disclosure laws for a somewhat complicated and novel fundraising operation not explicitly contemplated by Texas law.” It was clear, TEC wrote, that money given to TVC was bound for Davis and Battleground, that TVC reported its contributions and expenditures, and that the other two eventually reported what they received.Neither Davis nor Battleground “admits or denies” those facts and conclusions, the commission wrote, but they agreed to pay a $3,000 “sanction necessary to deter future violations” and to let the TEC post the orders. Sharelast_img read more