first_imgThis semester, more travel options are available for students looking for a ride. Following a pilot program last year, Uber is now officially allowed on campus, according to Notre Dame Security Police chief Keri Kei Shibata.Previously, Uber drivers could only pick up students at public access points, like main circle and library circle. Now, they are treated the same as cab drivers and allowed to go directly to student dorms and other locations on campus to pick up students.Shibata said the newness of Uber as a service for students was a red flag for the administration, so they wanted to take a close look at it before fully approving it. After the success of pilot program during the spring semester of 2016, Shibata said Uber proved it should be treated the same as cabs.“It’s just a new program, and we weren’t sure what the impact might be,” she said. “And so we allowed them to come on campus and closely monitored to make sure there weren’t any problems.”The rationale for slowly introducing Uber was more about practical than safety concerns, Shibata said.“It was partially for security and partially because space is limited on campus, and we weren’t sure how large the demand would be,” she said.Shibata said the University allows all cabs licensed by the city of South Bend to access campus and pick up passengers.“If there were any companies we had continuing problems with, we would restrict their access,” she said. “But so far, there haven’t been any.”The rise of Uber has led to some students taking on roles as drivers. Off-campus junior David Connelly said he started driving for Uber after an upperclassmen recommended he try it.“I just drive whenever I’m not too busy, and it’s a good way to make money for study abroad,” he said.While Uber has increased in popularity, Shibata said cabs still remain the most frequent choice for students and can sometimes lead to safety issues because they often cram in more students than they have seats for.“There are some forms of vehicles that are exempt from having a seat belt in every position,” she said.“But regardless, it’s not safe for there to be more passengers than there are seats.”While this practice is not illegal under Indiana State law — which exempts cabs from seat belt requirements, along with other public transportations like buses — Shibata said NDSP wants to discourage this potentially dangerous practice. Because Notre Dame is private property and NDSP is a private police force, cabs can be pulled over and targeted for overcrowding when on Notre Dame’s campus.“When they’re on campus, we have the ability to say that’s not acceptable,” she said.Tags: Cabs, NDSP, transportation, Uberlast_img read more


first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Training your brain to think positively will boost your effectiveness at work.Optimism is one of the greatest predictors of someone’s success, Harvard professor and positive psychology expert Shawn Achor said during a keynote address Monday at the CUNA CFO Council Conference in New Orleans.Believing that your behavior matters can transform not only your productivity but the effectiveness of those around you, says Achor, whose research on the impact of rational optimism in the business world appears in his book, “The Happiness Advantage.”Among the many examples Achor cites: Doctors with a positive outlook arrive at correct diagnoses 19% faster than those with negative or neutral emotions, and the 10% most optimistic insurance agents at MetLife outsell the other 90% combined.“The greatest competitive advantage in the modern economy is a positive and engaged brain,” he said.In fact, the underlying principle taught to many business leaders—that if you work harder you will be more successful and happier—is fundamentally flawed, according to Achor. continue reading »last_img read more


first_imgSouth Sudan on Tuesday rejected a United Nations appeal to halt the planned expulsion of the world body’s top humanitarian aid official in the country, saying he had regularly spoken out against the government.The United Nations announced Monday that South Sudan decided to expel Deputy Chief of the UN Mission and coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs Toby Lanzer.“We cannot withdraw our decision to expel Toby Lanzer,” elaborated South Sudan’s Presidential spokesman Ateny Wek Tuesday. He clarified that the move “is a sovereign decision taken by the cabinet due to statements made by the UN official which were deemed to be anti-establishment.”U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Monday condemned the move to expel Toby Lanzer, deputy head of the U.N. Mission in South Sudan, and said the British-born envoy had been “instrumental in addressing the increasing humanitarian needs of conflict-affected communities” in South Sudan.More than 2 million people have fled their homes, with 555,000 departing for neighbouring states. About a third of the nation’s 11 million people rely on food aid and other assistance.“He (Lanzer) has echoed the views of many members of the international community who believe it is time that the leaders of South Sudan pay heed to the suffering of their people,” the European Union delegation in South Sudan said in a statement.Lanzer’s expulsion was “an affront to the international community” that showed “a callous disregard for the suffering of the South Sudanese people,” the U.S. State Department said in a statement on Tuesday.Fighting has pitted soldiers backing President Salva Kiir, the country’s leader since independence from Sudan in 2011, against those loyal to his former deputy Riek Machar, who was sacked from his post in mid-2013.last_img read more


first_imgThe bond between sisters is one of the strongest that can be found in human nature. For the Wisconsin women’s basketball team, the bond between redshirt junior forward Michala Johnson and her younger sister, freshman forward Malayna Johnson, has helped on and off the court. It played a large role two years ago when one of them got the other to come to Wisconsin, and it has improved both of their games on the court and their relationship off the court.Hailing from Bellwood, Ill., a town about 13 miles outside of downtown Chicago, the Johnson sisters took very different paths to get to Madison. Coming out of high school, Michala was a blue-chip prospect who committed to play her collegiate career at powerhouse Connecticut. However, following two seasons in which she averaged just 5.1 minutes per game and wanting to play closer to home, Michala decided to transfer.While Michala was deciding between schools to transfer to, Malayna had already committed to play for the Badgers and head coach Bobbie Kelsey. ESPN gave her a score of 91 out of 100 coming out of high school, making Malayna yet another blue-chip in the Johnson family.And in a bit of a role reversal, the younger Malayna played the role of recruiter, trying to bring Michala’s talents to Madison two years ago.“I committed [to Wisconsin] first, before [Michala] even thought about coming here,” Malayna said. “I like the campus, I like the coaches. I didn’t mind if Michala came here at all. So when she decided to transfer I told her, ‘What about Wisconsin? That would be cool if we got to play together.’”Michala wasn’t originally going to come to Madison, and told Malayna that she would stay away if she didn’t want her on the same team.“I wasn’t going to come [to Wisconsin] because Malayna was here,” Michala said. “I told her if you want me to come, I’ll come, but if not I’ll go somewhere else. In high school and AAU we played on the same team and we had the same coaches and they would always compare us two. They would tell her that she needs to do what your older sister is doing. And I said if you don’t want that again, I’ll go somewhere else, but then she said she wanted me to come with her.”Luckily for Kelsey and the rest of the Badger team, Michala joined her sister and chose Wisconsin.Michala currently leads the Badgers in scoring, averaging 16.9 points per game (6th in the Big Ten) while ranking second on the team with 7.3 rebounds (10th in the Big Ten). Her 55.1 field-goal percentage is also a team-high and good for third best in the conference. Michala’s 6-foot-3 height has wreaked havoc in the post for opposing teams as they usually employ a double-team simply to contain her. She has been instrumental in helping Wisconsin match last year’s win total in Big Ten play.Malayna hasn’t had the impact that her older sister has, but it would be hard to match those numbers as just a freshman. Yet her playing time has increased in Big Ten play, as she now averages 6.1 minutes per game with even more playing time on the horizon.She stands an inch taller than Michala at 6-foot-4, which is what drew Kelsey’s attention to her while Malayna was in high school.“Well she’s 6-4, so it’s not hard to understand how she can affect the game,” Kelsey said. “She can change and alter shots. Other than that she’s smart, she picks up plays and schemes really well.”“Now that [Malayna’s] been here long enough she can understand the basketball language,” Kelsey added. “She’s just finding herself out there more. So we’ll get her more minutes.”What might be the most important thing, for the two sisters that is, is the ability to be with each other almost every day. Although they may not be attached at the hip, a bond between the two certainly exists that translates to the court.Whether it’s watching each other to improve their own games, teaching one another on and off the court, or simply lending a helping hand, the sisterly bond is evident in the Johnsons’ play.“We’re best friends,” Malayna said. “We hang out a lot, even at home. Our mom raised us to be best friends. Since we’re close off the court, we kind of have a vibe on the court too.”“I’ve always tried to help her as best as I could,” Michala said. “She listens to me sometimes, but I can tell that now she’s gotten into college and started playing basketball she now understands what I’ve been telling her for a long time. But she’s stepped a lot. I mean she’s the only freshman that’s playing right now so she’s improved a lot.”“On the court she knows my voice,” Michala added. “She knows I’ll be there to help her if she needs help with a double-team or anything like that.”Next season could feature an all-Johnson front line for the Badgers but until then, they’ll continue to learn from one another. And although Malayna has improved this season with Michala’s help, there is little doubt as to which of the two sisters would win in a game of one-on-one against each other.“Me,” Michala said. “Most definitely. Without a doubt. Every time.”last_img read more


first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s golf team traveled to Cincinnati for the Bearcat Invitational to start the month of October. The lineup consisted of juniors Griffin Barela, Sam Anderson and Nick Robinson, and freshmen Coalter Smith and Sebastian Iqbal.Coldstream Country Club played host to 13 total teams, including Big Ten rival Penn State. Other major schools included Louisville, Arkansas, Cincinatti and Kentucky.After the completion of 18 holes, the Badgers sat at eight-over-par as a team, led by Anderson, Barela and Iqbal who all shot one-over-par. Robinson and Smith did not trail far behind their teammates shooting two-over and three-over-par respectively.The second loop around the course Monday put the Badgers in a tie for eighth with a combined six-over-par. Final scores after two rounds: Anderson and Iqbal two-over, Barela three-over, Smith five-over and Robinson seven-over-par.Men’s Golf: Badgers to defend home course in opening fall tournamentThe fall golf season is getting underway for the Badgers at University Ridge — their home course. In their own Read…Entering round three on Tuesday, Anderson and Iqbal were in a tie for 23rd place individually. As a team, the Badger’s sat at 11-over-par, a whopping 33 shots off the lead as Louisville dominated the field.The team ended their promising weekend with an overall score of 20-over-par, putting them in a tie for ninth out of 13 total schools. All five Badger golfers finished in the top 50 of the field.While the trio of juniors performed well, the true stars of the tournament for Wisconsin were the freshmen. Iqbal and Smith put together a strong pair of days to finish 29th and 37th overall, respectively.At the Badgers’ last tournament, the Badger Invitational, Anderson produced a ninth place finish in his debut outing. This time around, Iqbal was the best performer for Wisconsin, finishing at four-over-par. These two young golfers have proved that the future may be bright for Wisconsin golf.Look out for the Badgers Oct. 6 as they begin the Marquette Intercollegiate at the prestigious Erin Hills, home of the 2017 U.S. Open.last_img read more