first_imgAn interesting workshop on the sustainable development of cultural tourism was held in the Museum of Vučedol Culture, organized by the Croatian Tourist Board. The workshop was held within the project “European Destinations of Excellence” (EDEN), and part of the entire program included a two-day study trip of journalists who got to know the beauties of Ilok, Vučedol and Vukovar. These are the destinations that are this year’s winner of the national EDEN election for 2016/2017. year, which was held on the topic of “Cultural Tourism”.On behalf of the Croatian National Tourist Board, the workshop was attended by Slavija Jačan Obratov, Director of the Sector for Destination Management and Offer Development Support, who stressed the importance of promoting cultural tourism. “Communicating emotions and creating experiences play a key role in promoting the offer of cultural tourism. The promotion of lesser-known and non-traditional tourist destinations, the creation of a European network of destinations that develop sustainable forms of tourism and the reduction of seasonality are the basic goals of the EDEN project, launched in 2006 by the European Commission.”, Pointed out Jačan Obratov.The director of the Vukovar-Srijem County Tourist Board, Rujana Bušić Srpak, emphasized that the basic tourist identity of this county is based on cultural attractions. Lidija Komes, EDEN Ambassador to Croatia, Mirela Hutinec, Director of the Museum of Vučedol Culture, Ružica Marić, Director of the Museum of Vučedol Vukovar City Museum, Jasna Babić, director of the Tourist Board of the City of Vukovar and Ivica Miličević, director of the Tourist Board of the City of Ilok.Museum of Vučedol Culture, VukovarIn order to show the participants good examples from practice, Gorana Barišić Bačelić, director of the Fortress of Culture, spoke from Šibenik, emphasizing the excellent results of visits to the two city fortresses, which have been visited by more than 550 visitors since the opening. She also added that in their case it was important not only to successfully implement the reconstruction projects of the fortresses in Šibenik, but also to effectively manage the post-project period. The conclusion of the workshop is that creative, modern and innovative models of cultural heritage management are increasingly in trend and that they need to be offered to foreign and domestic guests because Croatia is truly a country of rich cultural heritage.Unfortunately, this very interesting workshop was not announced, at least to the media, nor to the general public, which is a great pity and omission, because the general public was not aware of its holding, and accordingly could neither educate nor join the workshop.last_img read more


first_imgJeff PabstContent recognition and second-screen app provider Shazam has appointed Jeff Pabst as its new vice president, advertising sales, for its West Coast region.Pabst joins from social data provider ShareThis and will be tasked with creating  new ad formats that build on Shazam’s mix of display, audio, visual, and location-based technologies.“I’ve been a power user of Shazam for almost a decade and jumped at the opportunity to work for a company with world class tech, smart people, and such a creative canvas for marketers,” said Jeff Pabst.“The launch of Shazam for Brands is a game changer for advertisers and I look forward expanding our partnerships on the West Coast.”last_img read more


first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 28 2019All eyes will be on Oklahoma this week when the first case in a flood of litigation against opioid drug manufacturers begins Tuesday.Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter’s suit alleges Johnson & Johnson, the nation’s largest drugmaker, helped ignite a public health crisis that has killed thousands of state residents.With just two days to go before the trial, one of the remaining defendants, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries of Jerusalem, announced an $85 million settlement with the state on Sunday. The money will be used for litigation costs and an undisclosed amount will be allocated “to abate the opioid crisis in Oklahoma,” according to a press release from Hunter’s office.In its own statement, Teva said the settlement does not establish any wrongdoing on the part of the company, adding Teva “has not contributed to the abuse of opioids in Oklahoma in any way.”That leaves Johnson & Johnson as the sole defendant.Court filings accuse the company of overstating the benefits of opioids and understating their risks in marketing campaigns that duped doctors into prescribing the drugs for ailments not approved by regulators.The bench trial — with a judge and no jury — is poised to be the first of its kind to play out in court.Nora Freeman Engstrom, a professor at Stanford Law school, said lawyers in the other cases and the general public are eager to see what proof Hunter’s office offers the court.“We’ll all be seeing what evidence is available, what evidence isn’t available and just how convincing that evidence is,” she said.Most states and more than 1,600 local and tribal governments are suing drugmakers and distributors. They are trying to recoup billions of dollars spent on addressing the fallout tied to opioid addiction.Initially, Hunter’s lawsuit included Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. In March, Purdue Pharma settled with the state for $270 million. Soon after, Hunter dropped all but one of the civil claims, including fraud, against the remaining defendants. Teva settled for $85 million in May, leaving Johnson & Johnson as the only opioid manufacturer willing to go to trial with the state.But he still thinks the case is strong.“We have looked at literally millions of documents, taken hundreds of depositions, and we are even more convinced that these companies are the proximate cause for the epidemic in our state and in our country,” Hunter said.Precedent-Setting CaseThe companies involved have a broad concern about what their liability might be, said University of Kentucky law professor Richard Ausness.“This case will set a precedent,” he said. “If Oklahoma loses, of course they’ll appeal if they lose, but the defendants may have to reconsider their strategy.”With hundreds of similar cases pending — especially a mammoth case pending in Ohio — Oklahoma’s strategy will be closely watched.“And of course lurking in the background is the multi-state litigation in Cleveland, where there will ultimately be a settlement in all likelihood, but the size of the settlement and the terms of the settlement may be influenced by Oklahoma,” Ausness said.‘There’s Nothing Wrong with Producing Opioids”The legal case is complicated. Unlike tobacco, where states won a landmark settlement, Ausness pointed out that opioids serve a medical purpose.“There’s nothing wrong with producing opioids. It’s regulated and approved by the Federal Drug Administration, the sale is overseen by the Drug Enforcement Administration, so there’s a great deal of regulation in the production and distribution and sale of opioid products,” Ausness said. “They are useful products, so this is not a situation where the product is defective in some way.”Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapySchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahIt’s an argument that has found some traction in court. Recently, a North Dakota judge dismissed all of that state’s claims against Purdue, a big court win for the company. In a written ruling that the state says it will appeal, Judge James Hill questioned the idea of blaming a company that makes a legal product for opioid-related deaths. “Purdue cannot control how doctors prescribe its products and it certainly cannot control how individual patients use and respond to its products,” the judge wrote, “regardless of any warning or instruction Purdue may give.”Now the Oklahoma case rests entirely on a claim of public nuisance, which refers to actions that harm members of the public, including injury to public health.“It’s sexy you know, ‘public nuisance’ makes it sound like the defendants are really bad,” Ausness said.If the state’s claim prevails, Big Pharma could be forced to spend billions of dollars in Oklahoma helping ease the epidemic. “It doesn’t diminish the amount of damages we believe we’ll be able to justify to the judge,” Hunter said, estimating a final payout could run into the “billions of dollars.”Hunter’s decision to go it alone and not join with a larger consolidated case could mean a quicker resolution for the state, Ausness said.“Particularly when we’re talking about [attorneys general], who are politicians, who want to be able to tell the people, ‘Gee this is what I’ve done for you.’ They are not interested in waiting two or three years [for a settlement], they want it now,” he said. “Of course, the risk of that is you may lose.”Looking For TreatmentOklahoma has the second-highest uninsured rate in the nation and little money for public health. The state is trying to win money from the drug companies to pay for treatment for people like Greg, who is afraid he’ll lose his job if we use his last name.Greg and his wife, Judy, said they haven’t been able to find the integrated treatment that Greg needs for both his opioid addiction and his bipolar disorder. It’s either one or the other.“They don’t give you … a treatment plan for both,” Judy said. “They just say ‘Here, you can talk to this person.’ They don’t recognize that it’s like self-medicating.”The couple live in Guthrie, Okla., about an hour north of the courthouse where the opioid trial will take place. Greg said he has been addicted to opioids for 11 years. People with prescriptions sell him their pills — sometimes Greg binges and takes 400 milligrams of morphine at once, a huge dose.Of the $270 million Purdue settlement, $200 million is earmarked for an addiction research and treatment center in Tulsa, though no details have been released. An undisclosed amount of the $85 million Teva settlement will also go to abating the crisis. Judy said she hopes the treatment center will eventually help Greg.“I wish he would stop using [opioids], but I love him. I’ll always be here,” she said.This story is part of a partnership that includes StateImpact Oklahoma, NPR and Kaiser Health News. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more


first_imgPublished on COMMENT Karnataka Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy The Karnataka BJP Friday accused Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy of sedition and sought action over his remark asking people to “rise in revolt” against the saffron party for its alleged attempts to destabilise the state government.In its complaint to the state Director General of Police (DGP) Neelamani N Raju, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) alleged that the chief minister had violated section 124(A) (relating to sedition) and other sections of the IPC.Holding placards and raising slogans against former Prime Minister H D Deve Gowda and his sons, including Kumaraswamy, the BJP staged a protest near the Mysore Bank Circle, the nerve centre of the city, terming the chief minister’s remark as a “call for anarchy.” “Kumaraswamy, who holds a constitutional post, has given a call for people to rise in revolt,” BJP MP from Udupi Chikkamagaluru constituency Shobha Karandlaje said.Talking to reporters after submitting the complaint to the DGP, she said the person who was supposed to protect the Constitution and citizens of the country was “provoking” people.“Whatever was in Kumaraswamy’s mind finally came out in the form of words,” the BJP MP charged.Another BJP parliamentarian Prahlad Joshi termed the statement as the “most irresponsible and unpardonable offence” and said the chief minister’s choice of words displayed his state of mind.Upset over the alleged toppling game of the BJP, an angry Kumaraswamy had on Thursday warned BJP to be restrained in its speech about Gowda and his family, saying he can even ask people to rise in revolt against it if it continued to disturb Congress-Janata Dal-Secular coalition government headed by him.Launching a no-holds-barred attack on state BJP chief B S Yeddyurappa, Kumaraswamy had said: “If you dig too much (into our affairs), then we too have many things at our disposal.” “Government is in our hand. Don’t I have the authority to do whatever I can? I caution him to be careful,” he added.Hitting back, Yeddyurappa said if the state government was with Kumaraswamy, the central government was with the BJP.Soon after, Congress and JD(S) activists staged a demonstration outside Yeddyurappa’s house raising slogans against him for his alleged attempts to destabilise the coalition government.The BJP condemned the demonstration, saying that the state government was trying to muzzle the voice of the Opposition, which showed its “anti-democratic face”. Karnataka September 21, 2018center_img state politics SHARE SHARE EMAIL SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more