first_imgUniversity of Vermont,A gift from James Edward “Ted” and Danielle “Dani” Virtue of Rye, New York, will fund construction of a new synthetic turf field on the campus of the University of Vermont. Virtue Field, as the new facility will be called, will serve as the home for the UVM men’s and women’s lacrosse and men’s and women’s soccer teams and will also be used for campus recreation activities. It is the first phase of a planned stadium project that will include grandstand seating for 3,000 spectators, game-day locker rooms, public restrooms, concessions, and storage space.”The generosity and commitment of the Virtue family to our athletic program is truly remarkable,” said Dr. Robert Corran, UVM associate vice president and director of athletics. “I cannot overstate the impact this project will have on our lacrosse and soccer programs, and indeed the entire campus community. Our coaches and student-athletes are more than excited to see this project come to fruition, and I am thrilled to join them in extending our most sincere thanks and appreciation.”The new field is located next to Moulton Winder Field and UVM’s new outdoor track facility slated for completion in approximately three weeks. Phase one of construction, which began in early August, includes the field installation, perimeter fencing, temporary seating, and a scoreboard. Completion is expected by the end of October, weather permitting. The UVM men’s and women’s lacrosse teams will play their 2012 home games at Virtue Field.”We are tremendously grateful to the Virtue family for this generous gift, which allows us to proceed immediately with construction of an impressive new addition to UVM’s athletics facilities,” said O. Richard Bundy, III, UVM vice president for Development and Alumni Relations, which oversees fundraising for the university. “By elevating our competition space for lacrosse and soccer so dramatically, Virtue Field is a powerful and visible example of the significant impact that private giving can have on the quality of the student experience at UVM.”The 127×87-yard surface will be made of Revolution fiber manufactured by FieldTurf, which the company says is the most durable of its kind. A patented FieldTurf infill formula ensures player safety and is one of the most player-friendly surfaces on the market.”We could not be more excited for UVM and the Catamount administration,” said FieldTurf President Eric Daliere. “We take great pride that UVM has put their trust in our product and our company. We look forward to providing our innovative turf system in Virtue Field. The student-athletes will truly enjoy competing on this surface for many years to come.”The UVM Athletic Department is currently raising funds for the second phase of the project. Alumni and supporters of UVM Athletics are encouraged to contact Pat McBride, senior director of major gifts for UVM Athletics, at 802-656-7720 if they are interested in contributing to the project.last_img read more


first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Quentin FottrellMany older workers are holding on to their jobs instead of retiring — and that’s causing a logjam in the labor market.After reaching a historic peak in 2000, the labor force participation rate — the sum of workers and those who want to work as a proportion of the working-age population — “drifted gradually downward,” says Patrick O’Keefe, director of economic research at CohnReznick, an accounting and advisory firm. The decline accelerated with the 2008 recession and the rate fell to a 36-year low of 62.8% at the end of 2013 and, he says, “has hovered around that level since.” The rate was at 62.9% in January 2015.There’s been a sharp decline in labor force participation among younger workers (aged 16 to 24) and prime-age working adults (aged 25 to 54), according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics figures, while older workers have been holding on to their jobs. “Coincidentally, a larger share of baby boomers, an exceptionally large cohort, continues to participate at historically high levels,” O’Keefe says. “Fewer Americans have or are seeking jobs and that has long-term implications for the U.S. economy and economic policy.”In the fourth quarter, the labor force participation rate of younger workers was just 55.5% after holding steady at about 66% from 1998 to 2000, and participation by the prime earning group (ages 25 to 54) was unchanged at 80.8% after peaking at 84.4% in early 2000. However, participation among those approaching retirement had slipped only slightly from the mid-2010 post-war record rate of 65.3% to 64.3% in the most recent quarter and was 18.6% for those 65-plus, just shy of a two-year high of 19%. continue reading »last_img read more