first_imgThe destruction and permanent hurt of historic paedophile scandals in Donegal will be revisited in a harrowing documentary airing on TG4 tonight.Finné, on TG4 at 9.30pm, will delve into one of Ireland’s worst cases of child sexual abuse which took place in the Diocese of Raphoe over three decades.The programme will tell retired Garda Martin Ridge’s story and his investigation into the abuse crimes of the late Fr Eugene Greene and schoolteacher Denis McGinley. The cover-ups, the heart-breakingly violent rapes of young boys, and how the crimes came to light will all be discussed in the 60 minute documentary.Finné includes interviews with Martin Ridge, abuse victim Martin Gallagher, and Donegal journalists John McAteer and Michelle Nic Phaidin to explore the twisted abuses and the silence of the Catholic Church.Fr. Greene was sentenced to 12 years in prison in May 2000 and was released after serving 9 years.There were 26 victims, most of them altar boys, who served Mass with Fr Eugene Greene in County Donegal between 1965 and 1982. He died in March 2019. Teacher Denis McGinley of Magheraroarty, Gortahork was sentenced to 2 and a half years for sexually abusing pupils. 115 accusations were made about McGinley. He pleaded guilty to 15. McGinley was released after a year and a half in prison.The Tirconnail Tribune spoke with abuse victim Martin Gallagher last week as he made an impassioned call for a convicted abuser to leave the parish and allow the victims to grieve in peace. Read the full article here: Victims of ‘evil’ priest demand second abuser leave Donegal parishHorrors of paedophile priest uncovered in TG4 doc was last modified: October 31st, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:EUGENE GREENEFinnéTG4last_img read more


first_imgTV presenter Penny Lebyane speaks candidly about her post-natal depression in the short documentary Let’s Talk A group of health professionals pose for a picture during a workshop that was part of Sadag’s rural outreach programme on mental illness. One of many promotional pictures used by Sadag to drive the message home. A group of women in the KwaZulu-Natal area of Verulam attend a workshop on forming support groups in rural communities across South Africa.(Images: Sadag) MEDIA CONTACTS • Brigitte Taim Lange Strategic Communications +27 2 442 3083 RELATED ARTICLES • Boosting mental health reportage • Celebrities on sale for charity • Research says rooibos tea beats stress • Healthcare in South Africa Valencia TalanePeople with mental illnesses owe it to themselves to respond to the challenges of their conditions by seeking help and treatment to regain control of their lives. To achieve this, they must first be aware of their condition and what treatment is available to manage it.A social media campaign called ‘Let’s Talk Mental Health Awareness’ has been running since August in South Africa and aims to remove the stigma attached to mental illnesses.The situation, organisers believe, can improve if those who live with mental conditions talk about their struggles, cast off the associated shame, and encourage others to come forward to receive help from trained professionals.The project is a joint effort between the South African Depression and Anxiety Group (Sadag) and Pharma Dynamics, a company that provides generic medication for depression and anxiety.Embracing mental illnessThe initiative puts faces of well-known media personalities to different mental conditions that are familiar to a large number of South Africans. A short film, titled Let’s Talk, was produced as part of the campaign and made available on YouTube to reach large numbers. The release coincided with World Mental Health Day, which is celebrated on 10 October and is recognised by the World Health Organisation.Veteran actress Lilian Dube likens her experience a few years back to a feeling of being in a bottomless pit, even when around lots of people. She suffered from depression for many years without knowing what it was or how she could get help.Dube, along with others like television presenter Penny Lebyane and former Mr South Africa and now presenter of his own medical programme, Dr Michael Mol, talk candidly about their struggles with mental illnesses.“If you form a support group then you know you’re not alone,” Dube suggests. “The feeling of thinking you’re alone in your journey is the most terrible.” A leader of one such support group, Driekie Moutinho, agrees and says people with mental illnesses have to take a proactive approach to managing them.Psychiatrist Ian Westmore touches on the element of trust and says that people with mental Illnesses should understand that doctors have not only a good understanding of brain diseases, but know how to effectively treat most of them.“Mental illness is not a death sentence,” says Dr Gerhard Glober. “People with mental illness can have full, productive lives provided they recognise their needs.”Policy changes neededAs is the case with other health services in South Africa, there are disparities between treatment facilities for mental illnesses for urban and rural communities.People in urban areas have access to built-up facilities, healthcare professionals and treatment in abundance, while this is not the case for sufferers in rural areas.A concern among professionals in the mental health industry is that it is this population of patients, who live far away from ever-advancing facilities, who are more vulnerable because many lack awareness.A change in the overall health strategy of the country is needed, asserts psychiatrist Franco Colin.“The focus, from the national government’s perspective, is on tuberculosis, HIV, infant mortality, maternal health and violence-related trauma,” he said. “And psychology touches on each and every one of those areas.”Westmore agrees: “We get so little of the health budgets, while the private sector provides plans that do not cover mental health sufficiently.” His view is that there needs to be equity as far as mental conditions are concerned.Chilling factsResearch by Sadag reveals that one in five South Africans suffers from mental illness, while two in 100 children could be depressed. Experts worry that socio-economic factors like poverty and inequality as well as trauma and violence, which could in turn lead to substance abuse, continue to add to the pressure faced by the nation.Cassey Chambers, director of operations at Sadag, notes that mental illness is a big problem not only in South Africa, but most developing countries worldwide. All the more reason why, she says, campaigns like Let’s Talk should receive as much support as possible.“It’s not only sufferers who should be targeted, but also those who provide care for them.”Between 35% and 41% of pregnant or new mothers are victims of depression.As many as 23 people take their lives, and another 230 attempt to do so, in South Africa every day. The threat, many of the experts interviewed for Let’s Talk agree, lies in conditions being ignored or misunderstood for long periods of time.Television and film actress Bonnie Henna, who has appeared in international productions like Catch a Fire and Hotel Rwanda, recently revealed her struggles with clinical depression in an autobiography titled Eyebags and Dimples.Henna says in the book that for many years she lived with clinical depression and did not know it. Her father was murdered when she was only five years old and throughout her childhood and early adulthood her relationship with her mother, who later also discovered she had depression, was very strained.“Let’s Talk is certainly South Africa’s most ambitious mental health programme yet,” says Mariska Fouche, public affairs manager for Pharma Dynamics, adding that thousands of people have visited the campaign website since its launch.The campaign attracted many testimonials from teenagers to members of the elderly community, who said they were lonely and felt alienated. These were their biggest obstacles to fighting the conditions they live with, most commonly depression and anxiety.“We’ve invested a lot in the campaign,” says Fouche, “and we hope the film will start a large social media movement and help change attitudes and taboos that still exist around mental illness.”last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For those in previous generations, getting a handle on understanding the purchasing behaviors of the Millennial Generation can be somewhat vexing. At no point in recent generations has there been a more stark generational difference. This is largely due to changes in technology, a tough job market when entering the workforce and an increasingly global culture of inclusion and acceptance.“Millennials believe in fairness, inclusivity, access, and discovery. I define ‘Millennial’ based on mindset. You can look at a millennial by birth based on birth year — born in the late 70s to the late 90s — or you can look at it based upon behavior,” said Jeff Fromm, president of Future Cast and co-author of multiple books about marketing to Millennials. “You can find Millennials in their 50s who share those values, use mobile technology and are consumers of content. They are just as likely to pay for that coffee at Starbucks with their mobile phone as a Millennial-aged consumer is today.”While these generational differences may be of little consequence to some in the big scheme of things, people trying to directly market products are finding out how important these differences can be. The purchasing power of the Millennial Generation has quickly become noteworthy to savvy marketers. This has significant agricultural implications.“Millennials have a big interest in food, food culture and where their food comes from. They want access to information and that creates a lot of opportunities for smaller brands that are a lot of times more agile and nimble to create innovative products, provide more access to the sourcing of their products and get a small premium for those unique products,” Fromm said. “It’s a new day where small brands can compete more effectively than the big brands. Brands that get it right create huge sales volume potential around appealing to what Millennials value.”This trend can have tremendous implications for agriculture, particularly for small direct marketers who can sell products that provide the stories, information and experience millennial shoppers are seeking.”While these factors matter more to Millennials than previous generations, price is still important.“Price is hugely important, but Millennials are the ultimate day traders. They will pay a small premium for brands they love and then they will trade down to private label when they don’t see the value. Brands that do it right are able to get that small premium for their products,” he said. “Price is important, but there are ways to compete for Millennial affinity and earn it by using content, technology and other factors that would cause them to love your brand.”One way to appeal to Millennials is to provide an experience that they value.“Experience can mean access to being able to visit my favorite farm where I get my favorite products or it can mean inspired content from small brands that understand the best way to use their products,” Fromm said. “Experience is a way to create affinity and it is certainly important for the Millennial culture that has a desire to discover and learn and is collecting experiential currency along the way.”To find more from Fromm, visit Millenialmarketing.com.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The turkey vulture has long been a common (if not always pleasant) sight throughout Ohio’s rural landscape, but in more recent years its nastier, more brazen cousin has been showing up in the state.Black vultures — like turkey vultures — are scavengers that feast on carrion, providing a valuable service. Black vultures, though, are known to take things one-step further by facilitating the animal’s death when it suits their purposes.“Over the better part of at least the past 15 years, Ohio livestock producers have increasingly experienced problems with black vultures. Unlike its red-headed cousin the turkey vulture that feeds only on the carcasses of dead animals, black vultures are an aggressive bird that will, on occasion, kill other animals for food,” said Stan Smith, program assistant in Ag and Natural Resources for Fairfield County Extension. “It’s not an uncommon occurrence for a black vulture to attack a cow in the pasture while in labor in an effort to prey on the newly-born calf even while still in the birth canal.”The black vulture’s range is throughout much of the southeastern United States down into Texas and Mexico, though the bird has been seen as far north as Maine. The predatory scavengers have been gradually moving northward into Ohio.“We gauge their population by the calls we get for complaints whether it be property damage or livestock losses and this year it has increased from last year,” said Jeff Pelc, U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services biologist and district supervisor for southern Ohio. “We had a livestock loss as far north as Summit County this year from the black vultures. That is the first time black vultures have been reported that far north in Ohio.”There are several ways to tell the difference between a turkey vulture and a black vulture that often can be found in groups together. At ground level they can be easily distinguished by the color of their heads. Turkey vultures have a red head and black vultures have black heads.The wings are also distinctly different while in flight.“On the undersides of turkey vulture wings, the primary and secondary flight feathers are white to gray on the bottom side as you are looking up at the bird. Black vultures have only have white primary feathers on tips on the wings,” Pelc said. “Plus, the black vulture tail is much shorter compared to a turkey vulture tail which is more elongated.”The generally disagreeable black vulture may be even more so due to the fact that it is a protected species. Addressing a black vulture problem in the back 40 with a shotgun is illegal and subject to federal penalties.“They are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which means you cannot harm injure or kill them without a permit,” Pelc said. “You can harass them without a permit.”Pelc suggests a number of strategies livestock operations can employ to protect the animals from problematic populations of black vultures.“You can use pyrotechnics, loud noises, lights, lasers, and some people let their dogs chase them,” he said. “Cultural methods to control them would be to compost carcasses and stillborn animals and afterbirth immediately. They are scavengers by nature and they have a really good olfactory sense. If there is food there they will set up shop. They will focus on those areas.“You can also make the area less hospitable for the vultures. If you have a large solitary tree in your pasture where 20 vultures perch every day, cut it down. Don’t let them get accustomed to your property.”The next step in controlling black vultures is to get a permit.“You can apply for a depredation permit to remove a few of these birds. The intention of the permit is just to reinforce harassment,” Pelc said. “They are very social and very wise birds. When you take one or two of them out they get the hint very quickly.”Pelc said that the process of getting a depredation permit for black vultures is very easy in Ohio.“Just call our office and fill out the application. Then there is a form we fill out for the producer. The fee is exempt for the first time — the Ohio Division of Wildlife pays for first time applicants who are livestock producers for black vultures. If they need it in subsequent years that fee will be their responsibility financially,” he said. “It is a very timely process — it just takes a few business days — and they do not have to show that they have had predation. If the threat is there we can get the permit issued.”With a permit, a black vulture or two can be killed and put on display, which has proven to be very effective at keeping other black vultures away.“USDA’s National Wildlife Research Center found if you hang a bird in an area where others can see it they will vacate the area,” Pelc said.USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services specialists recommend some key factors in hanging a black vulture effigy including:Finding locations with the highest bird activity or use, often indicated by an accumulation of feces and feathers; Visibility of the effigy to birds coming into the roost; Prominent branches or support structures; and Accessibility to the site.From “Guidelines For Using Effigies to Disperse Nuisance Vulture Roosts” from the USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services National Wildlife Research Center: “Once a bird has been acquired under a legal permit, it should be determined whether a long term or temporary placement is needed. If long-term placement or multiple usage is required, it is advised that the bird be prepared by a taxidermist and then treated with a spray on preservative, such as Scotch Guard for leather. The posture of the prepared bird should resemble that of a dead bird hung by its feet with one or both wings hanging down in an outstretched manner. For short- term placement (up to three months, depending on weather conditions) and if odor is not a concern, then an intact carcass can be used, under legal permit.”Pelc said that if there has been livestock predation from black vultures, it is important that it is reported.“The national statistic is that for every one animal that is reported lost to predators, whether it is from coyotes or black vultures, there are five that go unreported,” Pelc said. “For us to capture what kind of impact predators are having in Ohio it is really important that they give us a call. We can help with technical advice per individual. We have a few specialists that can give more guidance.”To initiate the permitting process, livestock producers experiencing problems with aggressive black vultures should call USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services office at 866-487-3297 or 614-993-3444.For more on effigy placementlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In 2017, Cooper Farms donated a total of more than 267,000 pounds of cooked and ready-to-cook meat products to local churches, programs and organizations.“Cooper Farms prides itself on giving back to the local community,” said COO Gary Cooper. “We know there are a lot of people in need in our surrounding area. Being able to help those people by providing them with a healthy protein is the least we can do, and we’re more than happy to do it.”Some top recipients of these donations were the West Ohio Foodbank receiving over 95,000 pounds, St. Mary’s Catholic Food Pantry receiving nearly 26,000 pounds and Northwest Ohio Foodbank receiving nearly 23,000 pounds throughout the year. Cooper Farms has established very close relationships with these various organizations through these donations over the years.“Being able to provide these families with food is great, but getting to know the people involved in these various groups and programs has been just as rewarding,” said Heather Cooper, Cooper Farms stockholder. “Their mission is something to be admired, so we’re glad to be a part of it.”last_img read more


first_imgMumbai: A group of activists under the banner of recently formed Indians for Actualization of Democracy (IAD) on Wednesday released a fact-finding report on the March 25 communal violence at Vadavali in Patan district of north Gujarat, following a visit to the area.Vinod Chand, the president of IAD, called the incident as a “dacoity” rather than “riots,” and said the incident sparked off after a tiff between two schoolboys, one Hindu and the other Muslim, when the latter reprimanded the former for throwing stones at a beehive.last_img read more


first_imgExhorting the government to involve slum dwellers in the development of the city, Campaign for Housing and Tenurial Rights Convenor Varghese Theckanath on Monday said those living on bunds were worried in the wake of canal beautification projects and demanded that they not be relocated. “About 26% of the city population lives in slums, one-third of which are located on canal bunds. The government’s plan to transform canals should not disturb dwellers who have been living on the same lands for decades,” he said at a press conference here. Stating that most slum dwellers were employed in blue collar jobs, he added, “Driving them away from the city would burden their lives and cost them jobs. They are an integral part of the city and the government should ensure they remain so” Vijayawada Slum People’s Federation Convenor Chinni concurred with him and said they were not against the beautification of the city but demanded involvement in it. Calling for relocating slums to neighbouring areas, Housing Rights Network city Coordinator Sanjeev and Monfort Social Institute city Coordinator P. Ravindra Babu said RTI applications had been filed to find out available land for the same. Under threatTo gauge the impact of projects, a survey by the NGOs revealed that more than 36,000 persons of 8,000 families resided in the 31 slums on the bunds of Bandar, Ryves and Eluru canals and Budameru rivulet in the city.last_img read more