first_img16 October 2015Vuma Glenton Mashinini has been appointed the chairperson of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) of South Africa.The position has been vacant since the resignation of Pansy Tlakula in 2014, filled by Terry Tselane in an acting capacity in the interim. The Presidency made the announcement of Mashinini’s appointment on 14 October.Public Protector Thuli Madonsela found Tlakula “guilty of gross maladministration” for the lease agreement of the IEC’s headquarters in Centurion.Mashinini was appointed as a commissioner of the IEC in April.He has previously served as a special projects adviser to President Jacob Zuma, as well as deputy chief electoral officer of the IEC from 1998 to 2001. In the latter post he was responsible for the establishment and administration of the national head office, all nine provincial electoral offices and approximately 350 municipal electoral offices.About MashininiMashinini was born on 22 January 1961 in Joburg. His family emigrated to Australia in 1980, where he studied business and commerce at Curtin University.Mashinini’s political life includes the position of race relations officer at the Curtin University Students Union, according to the SABC. “His work saw him joining the African National Congress (ANC) in Western Australia, where he co-ordinated anti-apartheid campaigns. He also worked for the Campaign Against Racial Exploitation, an Australian anti-apartheid movement.”Zuma wished Mashinini all the best in his new responsibility.The IECThe IEC is a permanent body established by the Constitution to promote and safeguard democracy in South Africa. It is a publicly funded body and while it is accountable to Parliament, it is independent of government.It was established in 1993, has five full-time commissioners, appointed by the president, whose brief is to deliver regular, free and fair elections at all levels of government – national, provincial and local.In terms of the Electoral Commission Act of 1996, the IEC has to compile and maintain the voters’ roll and it is responsible for counting, verifying and declaring the results of an election, which must be done within seven days of the close of the election.The IEC is also responsible for:Compiling and maintaining a register of parties;Undertaking and promoting research into electoral matters;Developing and promoting the development of electoral expertise and technology in all spheres of government;Continuously reviewing electoral laws and proposed electoral laws, and making recommendations; and,Promoting voter education.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In 2017, Cooper Farms donated a total of more than 267,000 pounds of cooked and ready-to-cook meat products to local churches, programs and organizations.“Cooper Farms prides itself on giving back to the local community,” said COO Gary Cooper. “We know there are a lot of people in need in our surrounding area. Being able to help those people by providing them with a healthy protein is the least we can do, and we’re more than happy to do it.”Some top recipients of these donations were the West Ohio Foodbank receiving over 95,000 pounds, St. Mary’s Catholic Food Pantry receiving nearly 26,000 pounds and Northwest Ohio Foodbank receiving nearly 23,000 pounds throughout the year. Cooper Farms has established very close relationships with these various organizations through these donations over the years.“Being able to provide these families with food is great, but getting to know the people involved in these various groups and programs has been just as rewarding,” said Heather Cooper, Cooper Farms stockholder. “Their mission is something to be admired, so we’re glad to be a part of it.”last_img read more


first_imgExpressing anguish over the flouting of the order of the National Green Tribunal by devotees during the Chhath Puja, who broke open the gates of a Kolkata waterbody and performed rituals, Kolkata Mayor Firhad Hakim on Tuesday said that the state cannot suppress expression of any religious belief by using force.“They were not taking the law into their own hands. How can we use batons or tear gas on such people?” Mr. Hakim said.On November 2, thousands of people broke open the locks of the Rabindra Sarovar and performed Chhath Puja in the waterbody. In an order in 2017, the NGT had “strictly prohibited” performance of any puja, community picnic or organisation of other social events in and around the Sarovar. Spread over 192 acres, Rabindra Sarovar boasts of a huge biodiversity. On November 3, a film of oil floated above the lake water and several animals were found dead. According to the Mayor, 14 ponds were specially constructed for the puja so that devotees spare this waterbody. “I am sorry that despite taking many initiatives, we could not stop the devotees from going to Rabindra Sarovar. We did all what we could do but the people who traditionally come to Rabindra Sarovar came in large numbers and we could not stop them,” he said. The Mayor also suggested that ‘environmentalists’ should have instead spread awareness on the issue.“If the Mayor had listened to what the environmentalists had to say, then they would not have approached the courts,” Naba Dutta, a well-known environmentalist, said. Mr. Dutta said the ban on performing puja at Rabindra Sarovar was a result of years of legal intervention and it did not happen in one day. Trinamool Congress MP Abhishek Banerjee had expressed his displeasure over the way devotees stormed into the lake.last_img read more


first_imgThe Lalit Modi-BCCI feud has ended up costing Indian batting legend Sunil Gavaskar, whose payments for the work he did as an IPL Governing Council member are yet to be released.Gavaskar was part of IPL’s governing council between 2008-2010 and had been promised Rs 4 crore per year, over and above the Rs 1 crore for coming on board, by the then BCCI chief Sharad Pawar — a commitment which the present administration has not fulfilled till now.The public stance of the BCCI has been that the amount in question was a whimsical decision by the then IPL commissioner Lalit Modi.The fresh ammunition to the controversy was provided by Modi himself in an interview where he stated that the present BCCI President Shashank Manohar has not honoured the commitment to Gavaskar.”The money was promised to Gavaskar, it was agreed upon, it was on drafting stage of agreement (before the then set-up of IPL was changed). It’s been sitting on BCCI chief’s desk for years,” Modi said in a rare television interview earlier this week.Gavaskar, who is here on a commentary assignment, said, “Lalit (Modi) is only reiterating the facts of the matter. Since the first IPL was round the corner, I was informed that the paperwork and the formalities would be completed soon.”Mr Pawar had promised to have a meeting with his successor in BCCI and me but it’s been a hectic few seasons and so it hasn’t taken place.””However, since it is a commitment, made by the then BCCI president, I am sure, the matter will be sorted out to everyone’s satisfaction. I have full faith in Mr Pawar and BCCI in doing the right thing,” he added.advertisement- With PTI inputslast_img read more