first_imgSyracuse running back Delone Carter received a one-year conditional discharge for harassment in City Court Thursday for punching a fellow Syracuse University student in a Feb. 27 snowball-throwing incident, said his attorney, Kimberly Zimmer. Carter pleaded guilty to the charges, Zimmer said, which were reduced from a misdemeanor third-degree assault charge by Judge Langston McKinney Thursday. The charges are contingent upon Carter, whose case now remains open for the next year on a probationary status. Assuming Carter avoids any additional legal trouble, the case would then be closed, Zimmer said. ‘He pled guilty to harassment,’ Zimmer said. ‘The conditional discharge was basically his sentence. So the case remains open, if you will, until that year’s up. If there are no further problems with the law, then the case is closed and that’s it.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Through Zimmer, Carter offered a statement expressing relief that the process was finally over and gratitude to everyone who had helped him through the process. ‘He said he’s very thankful to those who have helped him through this process,’ Zimmer said, ‘including his family and the Syracuse University football program.’ Carter’s case had been postponed several times before finally reaching a conclusion on Thursday. The latest time it had been postponed was Sept. 14. Zimmer said that was normal in court proceedings similar to Carter’s situation. ‘That happens for a variety of reasons,’ Zimmer said. ‘Based on attorneys’ availabilities and others. But that happens typically in a lot of cases.’ The news comes just days after Carter was recognized by the Big East as the conference’s Offensive Player of the Week following his 172-yard, four-touchdown performance Saturday against Colgate. In what was first reported by The Daily Orange on March 3, a passenger exited a black SUV on the 300 block of Waverly Ave. and struck William Hotaling, a Syracuse student, in the face on Feb. 27 when a snowball hit the vehicle. The suspect was later revealed as Carter, who was riding with teammates Ryan Gillum, Donte Davis and Daniel Bailey in Gillum’s 2007 GMC Yukon. After the Syracuse Department of Public Safety and the Syracuse Police Department investigated, Carter and Gillum were taken in by police for questioning on April 14 in the hours leading up to Syracuse’s spring practice session that day. Carter was charged with assault later that night, and was subsequently suspended from the team and the university the following day. Carter missed the final two days of spring practice and the annual spring game. On Aug. 9 at Syracuse’s media day, SU head coach Doug Marrone announced Carter’s reinstatement and said he would not be further disciplined by the team. ‘We look forward to (Delone Carter) coming back and being a part of this team,’ Marrone said on Aug. 9. ‘One of the things that has happened is that we have taken disciplinary action internally as a football program and Judicial Affairs has had its part in that. As far as our football program goes, we have punished Delone and that punishment has been carried out. Now it is time for us to move forward.’ Added Marrone: ‘We took action right away, which is the way our program is. We took action immediately, internally, right off the bat, prior to him leaving campus and that punishment was fulfilled.’ And now, it appears the criminal trial proceedings and obligations are fulfilled for Carter as well. Something about which Zimmer said Carter is relieved. ‘Throughout the process,’ Zimmer said, ‘he has matured and grown personally, and he’s very grateful to have this behind him.’ aljohn@syr.edu bplogiur@syr.edu Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on September 29, 2010 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more


first_imgA new year and new opponents await the University of Wisconsin football team, and many critics are saying this year is going to be a walk in the park for the Badgers.Many people, however, seem to have forgotten that nothing ever seems to come easily for this Wisconsin team. Starting off the season with the departures of some of the most talented players and injuries already plaguing this team, this year seems like it is going to be a bit of a struggle for UW.Football: Jack Cichy to miss 2017 seasonThe University of Wisconsin Athletic Department announced Thursday morning senior Jack Cichy will miss the 2017 season due to a Read…The problemsFor starters, there are not that many games against any of the major Big Ten East teams. With Ohio State, Michigan State and Penn State all missing from this year’s schedule, the Badgers are not going to get much quality experience from the Big Ten East.This experience is necessary for the Badgers if they want to make it back to the Big Ten tournament this year — and win. With so many power schools missing from this year’s schedule, Wisconsin will find themselves going into Indianapolis this year with little practical experience against the team they will be facing.One of the other problems is their opening, non-conference schedule. The Badgers are facing three relatively inexperienced schools who will offer little to no insight on UW’s weaknesses. Schools like Florida Atlantic, who the Badgers will play Sept. 9th, will most likely be a walk in the park.Football preview: What to expect from the Badgers this seasonThe University of Wisconsin football team enters the 2017 season with high expectations and hopes of replicating, or even exceeding, Read…This does not help when you consider that after these three games, Wisconsin will face Northwestern in their first Big Ten game of the season. Northwestern has an even better non-conference schedule than Wisconsin, playing Bowling Green, Duke and Nevada within the first three weeks of play — which will help them in the long run.This means that the Badgers will have to fix their mistakes immediately if they want to keep their Big Ten record competitive enough to ensure their spot at the Big Ten Championship game. That kind of pressure could be suffocating for the team, and it means that one small mistake could be a disaster for this teamThe benefitsSince Wisconsin doesn’t see much of the Big Ten East, that also means they will save their record from some potential losses. Not seeing schools like Michigan State, Ohio State and Penn State means Wisconsin will not have to worry so much week to week about their record and their standings within the Big Ten.Another benefit of not seeing the Big Ten East as much this year is that it lowers the chances of injuries happening. Schools like Penn State and Ohio State tend to be aggressive defensively, which can lead to injuries. Injuries like these, which tend to happens late in the season, can be devastating when proceeding into the later part of December.The worst part of the schedule The last two weeks of the regular season are probably the toughest for Wisconsin. The Badgers will close out their home season run against Michigan, which is arguably one of the best teams in the Big Ten. While this game does take place in Camp Randall, it also means that the Badgers could end their season on a bad note while home.The next weekend of the schedule is not much better, with Wisconsin heading to Minneapolis to take on Minnesota. Typically, the Battle for the Axe is an intense game to begin with, but taking on the Gophers at home is going to be one of the more tougher games this season.Football: Chryst’s 100th win begins slowly, develops momentum in second halfWhile the first game of the season might have resulted in a win, the University of Wisconsin football team definitely Read…Wisconsin is looking at taking the Axe home for the thirteenth year, and taking on the Gophers in the heart of TCF Bank stadium is one of the hardest challenges known to Badger football.After those two games, the Badgers hope to head into the Big Ten Conference game, which will hopefully result in the Badgers heading to Pasadena for the Rose Bowl in January.What the Badgers are sayingJazz Peavy“We are in the Big Ten, and it’s not like we’re second class to any division in this league. Any game is a game that we have to prepare for. Nothing is ever going to come easy to us.”Sarah Godfrey/The Badger HeraldChris James“The Big Ten, overall, is well-rounded. Even a 3-10 team can compete [against the best teams]. This is a tough division. The east division is extremely tough, with Michigan, Ohio State and Michigan State all in the same division. Ohio State and Michigan used to play in the Big Ten championship game, but now they can’t. Those match-ups cause a lot of ruckus and a lot of upsets.”Natrell Jamerson“A lot of people doubt our defense, especially after losing so many great players. We feel like our defense is even better than last year. People just doubt our team in general. We’re trying to do a lot more than we did last year.”last_img read more