first_img By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary BLOG: How DOC is Helping Inmates with Mental Illness Transition Home (Round-up) Criminal Justice Reform,  Round-Up,  The Blog Yesterday, Department of Corrections officials highlighted a state-run, first-of-its-kind unit at the Wernersville Community Corrections Center that helps individuals with mental illness transition home following incarceration. At the media event, reporters were given a tour of the 32-bed unit and interviewed employees and center residents.“We are proud of our efforts to address the behavioral health needs of those who are incarcerated in Pennsylvania,” said Corrections Secretary John Wetzel. “With fully one-quarter of all of those entering prisons in Pennsylvania diagnosed with mental illness and nine percent of those struggling with serious mental illness, it is imperative that the department develop the best possible programming to help them succeed when they return to the community. We anticipate that Pathways Transitional Wellness Center will become a model facility for other states.”Take a look at the additional coverage below: May 18, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Philadelphia Inquirer: Helping mentally ill inmates find their way home“When Henry Hamm, a 61-year-old Lancaster man who has schizophrenia, finished serving time for writing a bad check, he was sent to a new program designed to help offenders with serious mental illnesses rejoin the outside world. He joined Pathways Transitional Wellness Center, which connects mentally ill parolees to social and medical services, housing, and jobs before they try to make it on their own. Three months later, he’s a fan of the nine-month-old Department of Corrections program, which is housed in a boxy, utilitarian building on the grounds of Wernersville State Hospital, about nine miles southwest of Reading.”Allentown Morning Call: State touts reentry program for seriously mentally ill inmates“As a state prison inmate with serious mental illness, 61-year-old Henry Hamm represents one of the biggest challenges that Pennsylvania’s corrections system faces. Hamm, who is serving a 2- to 4-year sentence in Lancaster County for felony theft, is diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Too often, the extra hurdles he faces would make his time as a prisoner a difficult one, and one in which he risked returning to the streets no better able to cope with his problems than when he left. Enter a first-of-its-kind program at a halfway house run by the Department of Corrections on the campus of Wernersville State Hospital, roughly 10 miles west of Reading.”Reading Eagle: State corrections secretary celebrates success at Wernersville center“Mentally ill Americans are disproportionately more likely to be arrested, incarcerated and commit another crime once released. This problem extends to the state level. Pennsylvania Department of Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said about 27 percent of all inmates in the system have a mental illness and about 9 percent of those are battling severe disorders. So to address the needs of this unique population the department launched a new program solely dedicated to helping those offenders return to the community after they have served their time.”Follow the Department of Corrections on Twitter @CorrectionsPA and on Facebook. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more


first_imgRadio NZ News 10 November 2014An independent inquiry has found child abuse and family violence amongst Maori is costing the country up to $3.4 billion.Sir Owen Glenn’s report looks at the amount paid for treating victims, loss of workplace activity and by government agencies this year.The project commissioned by the Glenn Inquiry said tangata whenua are over-represented in statistics on child abuse and violence between intimate partners.It said while Maori made up only 15 percent of the population, half of those who use Women’s Refuge services are Maori, and over half of the number of family violence offenders.So far in 2014, the cost of abuse amongst Maori is between $1.8 billion and $3.4 billion.http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/te-manu-korihi/259046/maori-over-represented-in-abuse-statslast_img read more


first_imgThe 5th Grade Boys team was defeated by the Laurel Yellow Jackets by a score of 37-15.The Cardinals were led in scoring by Sam Laloge who netted 6 points. Other scorers were Henry Wanstrath (4 points), Max Amberger (3 points), and Christian Mack (2 points). The Cardinals were led in rebounding by Max Amberger with 8 rebounds. Other players getting rebounds for the Cardinals were Sam Laloge (5), Henry Wanstrath (4), Christian Mack (2), Santiago Schutte (2), Zavier Tekulve (1), and Adam Meer (1).Despite the loss, the boys fought until the very end. Next up for the Cardinals is a rematch against the Yellow Jackets in Laurel on Tuesday, November 14th.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Ryan Tekulve.The Cardinals 6th Grade team won 30-21.Player Points Scored: Conner Miles – 15 pts.; Hank Ritter – 9 pts.; Calvin Grote – 2 pts.; Caron Meyer – 2 pts.; Evan Flaspohler – 2 pts.Rebounds: Hank Ritter – 5; Carson Meyer – 2; Conner Miles – 2.Steals: Hank Ritter – 7; Preston Conway – 3; Elliott Werner – 2.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Jerry Roell.last_img read more


first_imgFilipino boxer and politician Manny Pacquiao has repeated his opposition to homosexuality, after earlier apologising for saying that gay people were “worse than animals”.”What I am saying is right. I mean I am just stating the truth, what the Bible says,” he said at training in his hometown of General Santos.The boxer said his only mistake had been to compare people to animals.Nike ended its deal after his initial comments, calling them “abhorrent”.Mr Pacquiao had said during a TV interview that animals were better than gay people “because they can distinguish male from female”.His remarks were condemned across the world – including by gay basketball star Jason Collins and the boxer who defeated him last May, Floyd Mayweather. Mr Pacquiao then apologized on Facebook, saying he was sorry for hurting people and was “not condemning LGBT” but was still against gay marriage.But on Thursday, a Bible quote appeared on his Instagram account, reading: “If a man has sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They are to be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads.”Local Filipino media captured a screenshot of the image before it was deleted and Mr Pacquiao’s staff in General Santos confirmed that the post had been published on the boxer’s account.However, Mr Pacquiao – still wearing his Nike sports gear – insisted the row had not affected him.”I’m happy. I’m always happy because God is with me,” he said. Mr Pacquiao intends to retire from boxing after his April fight against Timothy Bradley from the US, and will step up his career in politics.The boxer, who has converted from Catholicism to an evangelical Protestant faith, has said he wants to be president.Homosexuality is not a crime in the Philippines, but gay marriage is against the law in the strongly Catholic country.last_img read more