first_imgThe Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabha is all set to commence its Phagwah celebrations with its annual Phagwah mela, ‘Rang Rasiya’, being staged at the Dharmic Kendra in Prashad Nagar, Georgetown on February 24.Persons attending the event can expect to be entertained by performances fromThese dancers are among those who would be performing at the melasome of Guyana’s finest artistes, which include Mona Gowkaran, Ganindra, Shivanand Singh, Vidya Singh, Varun Samlall, Celia Samaroo and Roopchand.Members of the very popular Dhamic Nritya Sangh will also be performing various dance numbers, along with dramatic pieces by Travez Piaralall.There will be a feast of many sweet and savory delicacies, such as Indian curries, samosas, and sweet meats to excite both the young and old.The gates will be opened at 16:00h in the afternoon, and tickets are priced at $800. However, children under 10 years of age will be admitted free of cost.The sabha hereby advises the public that no alcoholic beverages would be allowed on the premises, and all are encouraged to grace the event with their presence.last_img read more


first_img Sandals Foundation to the rescue for Dominica Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Aug 2015 – Danny is dead. No trace of the storm which last week was at its worst, a category three hurricane and which yesterday was a Tropical Storm. Two systems are being monitored in the Atlantic; one late last night evolved to being Erika, a fast moving Tropical Storm moving west at 20 mph… the other still at a low chance for developing. Update on the Tropics; System forecast to strengthen Hurricane Joaquin damaging and costly to TCI Recommended for you Related Items:danny, erika, tropical stormlast_img read more


first_imgA video grab from footage broadcast by the UK Parliament`s Parliamentary Recording Unit (PRU) shows Britain`s prime minister Theresa May (3L) reacts as opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn responds to her statement to the House of Commons in London on 14 January 2019. Photo: AFPThe British parliament holds a historic vote Tuesday on the Brexit deal agreed with the EU and all sides are bracing for turmoil when the text is almost certainly rejected.With just over two months to go until the scheduled Brexit date of 29 March, a bitterly divided Britain is in limbo and the world is on tenterhooks about what will happen next.Few expect the deal to pass, but the scale of prime minister Theresa May’s defeat could determine whether she tries again, loses office, delays Brexit — or if Britain even leaves the EU at all.MPs from all parties oppose the agreement, for different reasons, but on the eve of the vote May urged them to look again.”No, it is not perfect. And yes, it is a compromise,” she said.”But when the history books are written, people will look at the decision of this house… and ask: did we deliver on the country’s vote to leave the European Union?”Or did we let the British people down?”Nothing has changedThe deal was agreed with the EU in November after 18 months of talks described as Britain’s toughest since World War II.But hardline Brexit supporters fear it keeps Britain too closely tied to the EU and represents a “betrayal”, while pro-Europeans argue it leaves the country half-in, half-out.Rather than heal the divisions exposed by the 2016 Brexit referendum, it has reignited them, with pro-European MPs facing death threats and harassment outside parliament.Brexit supporters around the country have voiced growing frustration with what they see as parliamentary blockage of their democratic vote, while europhiles see hope in the increased talk of a second referendum to end the impasse.May postponed a House of Commons vote on the deal in December, facing certain defeat, and has since offered MPs clarifications she hopes will convince them.Criticism is focused on an arrangement to keep open the border with Ireland by aligning Britain with some EU trade rules, if and until London and Brussels sign a new economic partnership.May has offered parliament greater oversight of this so-called backstop, and at her request, EU leaders have also given written assurances that the arrangement would not become permanent.A handful of Conservative MPs have changed their minds to back the deal, but a junior minister resigned on Monday so he could vote against it — and the core of May’s critics say she has not done enough.”Nothing has fundamentally changed,” said Nigel Dodds of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), the Northern Irish party on whom May relies for her Commons majority.Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said May had “completely and utterly failed” to ease MPs’ concerns and said if she loses the vote on Tuesday night, she must call an election.His party has also threatened a confidence vote in her government.Risk of no dealVoting begins at 7:00 pm (1900 GMT), with MPs likely to decide on a number of amendments first, which could seek to change or kill the Brexit deal.In the event of a defeat, the government must set out what happens next by Monday at the latest.Speculation is growing on both sides of the Channel that May could ask to delay Brexit, but she said Monday: “I don’t believe that the date of March 29 should be delayed.”The withdrawal agreement includes plans for a post-Brexit transition period to provide continuity until a new relationship is drawn up, in return for continued budget contributions from London.Without it, and if there is no delay, Britain will sever 46 years of ties with its nearest neighbours this spring with no new arrangements to ease the blow.MPs fearful of a “no deal” scenario have vowed to use parliamentary procedures to force the government to seek an alternative plan that the Commons can support.Some commentators suggest May could return to Brussels, seeking further assurances on the deal and the future EU-UK relationship and ask parliament to vote again.”At the second time of asking, MPs might just vote for her deal over the catastrophe that would be no deal,” said John Springford, deputy director of the Centre for European Reform.last_img

first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneOn the last day of the 85th Legislative session, protesters opposed to Senate Bill 4 — the “sanctuary cities” bill fill up the rotunda of the state Capitol in Austin on May 29, 2017.Opponents of the state’s immigration enforcement legislation have asked a federal appeals court to reconsider a decision that allowed most of the controversial measure to go into effect.Attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union, Travis County and the city of Austin on Tuesday asked the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear the case en banc, which means the entire court would consider the lawsuit. The move comes two weeks after a three-judge panel of the same court allowed most of the law, Senate Bill 4, to go into effect after major portions were initially blocked by a federal district judge in August. The ACLU represents the small border city of El Cenizo, which was the first to file suit last year to stop SB 4’s implementation days after Gov. Greg Abbottsigned it into law.SB 4 allows local law enforcement officers to question the immigration status of people they detain or arrest and punishes local government department heads and elected officials who don’t cooperate with federal immigration “detainers” — requests by agents to turn over immigrants subject to possible deportation — in the form of jail time and penalties that exceed $25,000. The legislation also applies to public universities and colleges.In August, U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia temporarily halted several parts of the bill, including a section that requires jail officials to honor the detainers. He also blocked sections that prohibit local entities from pursuing “a pattern or practice that ‘materially limits’ the enforcement of immigration laws” and another that prohibits “assisting or cooperating” with federal immigration officers as reasonable or necessary.But the appellate court panel’s ruling two weeks ago effectively unshackled the legislation, allowing most of it to be implemented while the original case goes back to Garcia’s courtroom. The only provision that is still blocked is one that punishes local officials for “adopting, enforcing or endorsing” policies that prohibit or limit enforcement of immigration laws. The judges kept that injunction in place but said it only applies to the word “endorse.”The list of local entities that have previously filed suit against SB 4 also includes El Paso, Maverick and Bexar counties, the cities of El Paso, San Antonio and Houston, among others. Nina Perales, the vice president of litigation for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, or MALDEF, said if the 5th Circuit agrees to hear the case, all parties to the suit will become involved. MALDEF represents the cities of San Antonio and El Paso, as well as Bexar County, in the litigation.“We are all supporting each other’s efforts and working together in close collaboration and putting our resources in a two-pronged strategy,” she said.The other angle is preparing for the trial at the district level, where Garcia will hear arguments over the bill’s constitutionality. Perales said it’s unclear when — or if — the 5th Circuit will come down with a decision on Tuesday’s petition. Another option is to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the injunction, but Perales said plaintiffs have to wait on the appellate court to act before considering that move.“It’s like a decision tree, and we won’t know what options are available to us until the 5th Circuit responds,” she said.After the court’s decision earlier this month that allowed most of the bill to stand, several opponents of the measure said they weren’t surprised because the 5th Circuit is considered a conservative body. But Perales warned against painting any group of judges with “too broad a brush.”She pointed to a 2013 decision by the same court in favor of MALDEF during its case against the Texas city of Farmers Branch, which passed an ordinance that would have punished landlords from renting to people based on their immigration status. “These are the life lessons that teach you not to predict what the 5th Circuit might do or how they might decide a case,” she said. Sharelast_img read more


first_imgA space elevator would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, and then another 40,000 miles to a weighted structure for stability. And a space elevator – if it ever becomes reality – will be quite long. NASA needs about 144,000 miles of nanotube to build one. In theory, a cable would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, which is the distance at which satellites remain in geostationary orbit. Due to the competing forces of the Earth’s gravity and outward centrifugal pull, the elevator station would remain at that distance like a satellite. Then the cable would extend another 40,000 miles into space to a weighted structure for stability. An elevator car would be attached to the nanotube cable and powered into space along the track.NASA and its partner, the Spaceward Foundation, hope that a space elevator could serve as a cost-effective and relatively clean mode of space transportation. NASA’s current shuttle fleet is set to retire in 2010, and the organization doesn’t have enough funds to replace it until 2014 at the earliest. To fill the gap, NASA is hiring out shuttles to provide transportation to the International Space Station from private companies. So NASA could use a space elevator, the sooner the better. Space elevators could lift material at just one-fifth the cost of a rocket, since most of a rocket’s energy is used simply to escape Earth’s gravity. Not only could a space elevator offer research expeditions for astronauts, the technology could also expand the possibilities for space tourism and even space colonization.Currently, the Cambridge team can make about 1 gram of the new carbon material per day, which can stretch to 18 miles in length. Alan Windle, professor of materials science at Cambridge, says that industrial-level production would be required to manufacture NASA’s request for 144,000 miles of nanotube. Nevertheless, the web-like nanotube material is promising.”The key thing is that the process essentially makes carbon into smoke, but because the smoke particles are long thin nanotubes, they entangle and hold hands,” Windle said. “We are actually making elastic smoke, which we can then wind up into a fiber.”Windle and his colleagues presented their results last month at a conference in Luxembourg, which attracted hundreds of attendees from groups such as NASA and the European Space Agency. John Winter of EuroSpaceward, which organized the conference, thought the new material was a significant step.”The biggest problem has always been finding a material that is strong enough and lightweight enough to stretch tens of thousands of miles into space,” said Winter. “This isn’t going to happen probably for the next decade at least, but in theory this is now possible. The advances in materials for the tether are very exciting.”via: Times Online and Gizmodo© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth Citation: Long, Stretchy Carbon Nanotubes Could Make Space Elevators Possible (2009, January 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-stretchy-carbon-nanotubes-space-elevators.html (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists from Cambridge University have developed a light, flexible, and strong type of carbon nanotube material that may bring space elevators closer to reality. Motivated by a $4 million prize from NASA, the scientists found a way to combine multiple separate nanotubes together to form long strands. Until now, carbon nanotubes have been too brittle to be formed into such long pieces.last_img read more