first_imgAs usual, just before kickoff, the Notre Dame marching band played the national anthem at the start of Saturday night’s football game against Florida State. This time, however, as most of the crowd stood with their hands over their hearts, part of the student section refused to rise.Instead, as the marching band began their performance of the national anthem, at least 60 students at the front of the junior student section knelt to show solidarity with victims of police violence and to protest racial profiling of African Americans. ANDREW CAMERON | The Observer At least 60 students kneel during the national anthem at the Notre Dame-Florida State football game Saturday night. The move was intended to signal solidarity with victims of police violence and to protest racial profiling.The organizers of the protest, juniors Mary Katherine Hieatt, Durrell Jackson, Shawn Wu, Nicholas Ottone (Editor’s Note: Nicholas Ottone is a Scene writer for The Observer) and Brian Gatter, claimed to be continuing the movement started by ex-NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who sparked controversy when, beginning in 2016, he sat, and in later games knelt, during the national anthem played before his games.“We’re doing a protest,” Jackson said. “It’s known as the national anthem protest, but we’re not really protesting the national anthem. We’re taking a stand against social injustice and police brutality. The movement was started by Colin Kaepernick.”The idea for the protest began when Wu noticed Jackson and other African-American friends of his sitting during the anthem at an earlier game in the season, Wu said. Taking inspiration from his participation in the ‘Realities of Race’ seminar he took last spring, Wu contacted Jackson. Together with Hieatt and fellow seminar participants Gatter and Ottone, the group decided to gauge interest by making a Facebook event. On the evening of Nov. 4, the five organizers created the private Facebook event “FSU Game Kneeling in Solidarity.”“The decision that this was going to happen was contingent on how much support it had on the Facebook page,” Ottone said. “We realized the effectiveness of any kind of display would really depend on how much of a response we could get. Really, that turning point was Tuesday or Wednesday.”The event description instructed participants to enter the stadium as soon as the gates opened, to fill the front of the junior student section and to kneel, holding hands with neighbors and crossing arms for the duration of the anthem. The description of the event on Facebook included that the goal of the protest was “[t]o visibly kneel in solidarity with victims of systemic racial injustice.”Several of the organizers expressed dissatisfaction with student complacency and unwillingness to make political demonstrations on campus. Wu said part of the effectiveness of the form of the protest was its visibility.“Oftentimes we can have these events that talk about race or diversity, or that challenge them, and oftentimes these events don’t reach people or people don’t go outside of their way to put themselves into these spaces,” Wu said. “I think one of the special things about this protest is that everyone sees it and everyone is going to consider it.”Since Kaepernick’s kneeling began making national headlines in 2016, kneeling during the anthem as a form of protest has been widely criticized, including by former Notre Dame football head coach Lou Holtz, who said kneeling players were “hurting the sport.” Asked how he would respond to criticisms that kneeling showed disrespect for the flag and for the military, Jackson said the protest was in line with American values.“The troops fight for our right to protest, and that’s what we’re doing,” he said. “I respect the troops and everyone here in this stand respects the troops because we know they’re fighting for us. They’re not just fighting for our country to be protected, they’re fighting for our country to be better. It’s the part of the people who are here, who are not risking their lives every day, to fight for what’s better.”Some students in the student section did not see or notice the demonstration, among them senior Matthew Piwko.“I truly didn’t notice at all,” Piwko said. “I wasn’t paying very close attention but it wasn’t very obvious on the whole, even for someone who was looking for it.“I think people can express their opinion any way they want. I don’t necessarily agree with it but it’s their right to kneel if they want to.”Junior Loyal Murphy entered the student section early and stood near the kneeling students but did not participate. He said he saw the demonstration, but did not think it was very noticeable.“When people are thinking about the Florida State game, they’re not thinking about the protest,” he said. “It didn’t make a big impact in my life. I didn’t really care. I was just like ‘Oh cool, well at least if they think they’re doing something, I guess that’s a good thing.’“You could tell it was a section that went down on one knee, but I think it was too small and I don’t feel like it had any true impact to the game or to the issues in general.”Junior Gregory Wall, who participated in the protest, described the demonstration as a success.“I think on such short notice, it was successful, especially being able to convince 80 people to come an hour and 45 minutes early when it’s 35 degrees out and almost snowing and on the last game of the season, when everyone’s tailgating and everyone’s enjoying themselves, to be willing to go out and fight for what you believe in,” he said.Tags: Colin Kaepernick, Kneeling, national anthem, police brutality, protest, racial injusticelast_img read more


first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 121 Hoyland Street, Bracken Ridge, is on the market for $470,000.“Rising markets are good places to buy. Plateau markets are the ones where sales volumes have settled down but there is still potential for price growth. Decline and danger markets are the ones to avoid.”Half of the Brisbane suburbs with growth trajectories were either in Brisbane North (the middle market north of the river) or the nearby Moreton Bay Region.Five suburbs had growing sales activity in Brisbane’s north, including the likes of Bracken Ridge, “where quarterly sales have been 79-89-91-95 in the past year”. Thirteen were seeing steady and consistent sales demand. Hotspotting head Terry Ryder flagged five “danger” markets in Brisbane – where prices were in decline, sales activity had dropped sharply and vacancies were marked as high. Just one of those five – Fig Tree Pocket – was for houses, while the other four Albion, Bowen Hills, Fortitude Valley and Spring Hill all concerned unit market activity.The “decline” markets category showed “locations where the previous price growth will cease and in some cases prices may fall”. MORE: Dream retreat comes with helipad 121 Hoyland Street, Bracken Ridge, has attracted first home buyers, with potential for the house to be lifted to legal height – the downstairs is currently used as casual space, storage and garage.Siana and John Wicks were among homeowners looking to capitalise, putting their house at 121 Hoyland Street, Bracken Ridge, on the market for $470,000 – which is less than the Greater Brisbane median.“Once we put a price on it, buyers starting coming through … We’ve been here eight years. We bought it off John’s parents who had it since 1992, so basically John has lived here all his life almost,” Mrs Wicks said. “We hope to have sold it by Christmas.”“We have bought (a 3,000sq m block) at Elimbah near Caboolture, we’re building a house. We do love this area but just to get the space we need we do have to move out a bit. We wouldn’t really be moving otherwise.” FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK The prospects were so good for Brisbane’s north, it was the only part of the Queensland capital with “no declining or danger markets”, the index report said.“The Brisbane North precinct is the most active part of the Brisbane market, which is poised for stronger growth.”Alderley, Algester, Annerley, Arana Hills, Banyo, Bardon, Birkdale, Bracken Ridge, Kedron, Murrumba Downs, Norman Park, Ormiston, Paddington, Petrie, Rochedale, Sandstone Point, Stafford Heights, Taringa, Tarragindi and Warner were declared star performers for houses.Rising market were ones “where sales activity is increasing, which is generally a precursor to prices increasing”, a Hotspotting spokeswoman told The Courier-Mail. Among homes for sale in Stafford Heights is this five bedder at 21 Chaplin Street.“We felt there needed to be a stage between “plateau” markets (those where sales activity has passed its peak but settled at solid levels below the peak) and “danger” markets (those where sales activity has dropped sharply, prices are falling and vacancies are high).”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours ago“The “decline” markets are those which have passed their peaks, but sales levels have not plateaued – they have continued to decline markedly, with demand falling steadily.”Real estate agent Narelle Lorensen of Place Nundah said Brisbane’s northside was a growth area with demand across multiple suburbs. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:40Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:40 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenOpen for inspection etiquette for buyers00:41 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:36Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhat do QLD buyers want?00:36 How single dad built 16-property portfolio Brisbane home values could new high in months “There are a lot of active buyers in the market and not really enough listings to service them all in Brisbane’s northside,” she said.“Brisbane is certainly very good value. It’s a wonder we’re not seeing a lot more investors given the value is so good compared to southern states. Our rentals have picked up in value. In previous years rent had been quite low but there has been some recovery in rental value, now that sales picking up again that might even out.”She said places like Bracken Ridge were high growth areas, attracting a lot of first homebuyers especially because of the affordability of houses there. 118 Pope Street, Tarragindi, on the market looking for offers over $1.275m.Good annual price growth had already begun in some parts of the precinct, including Northgate (up 16 per cent), Geebung (up 7 per cent) and Nudgee (up 8 per cent), while Moreton Bay region was seeing values jump in Scarborough (up 9 per cent) and Woody Point (up 11 per cent).The much maligned apartment sector was also seeing some good growth out of seven suburbs, including bluechips like Queensland’s most expensive suburb Teneriffe, and millionaire zone Paddington. Alderley, Annerley, Kedron, Norman Park and university suburb Taringa were all star unit risers. Siana and John Wicks with Tana 7, Leo 6 and Malley 2 at their Bracken Ridge home which is on the market for $470,000. Picture: Peter Wallis.Twenty suburbs have been named Brisbane’s growth stars with values set to rise off a surge in housing demand – and seven also performed strongly for the apartment sector, the latest industry survey has found.The Spring Price Predictor Index – released by analysis firm Hotspotting today, saw Brisbane’s North named one of the top 10 growth zones in the country, alongside the Sunshine Coast, Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Bendigo in Victoria and Belconnen in Canberra.last_img read more