first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Growing up on the North side of Milwaukee, Jordan Poole was always one of the youngest, smallest kids on the pick up court. Charges to the basket were met by stronger bodies, and so he had to find other means to score.“I was accustomed to finding a way to create my own shot because, when I was younger playing against older kids, you would go to the basket and it really wasn’t doing too much. They were just physically stronger,” Poole said. “I think that’s something I’ve never …last_img read more


first_imgBritish Foreign Secretary David Miliband And South Africa’s Foreign Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma discussing various issues. Miliband chatting to Deputy Foreign Affairs Minister Sue Van der Merwe. (Pictures: Department of Foreign Affairs) Khanyi MagubaneSouth Africa and the United Kingdom have reinforced their relationship following a recent two-day meeting of the eighth SA-UK Bilateral Forum.Speaking at the conclusion of the visit from her counterpart, British foreign secretary David Miliband, South Africa’s minister of foreign affairs Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said on 8 July she was happy with the wide range of issues covered during the talks.“We have discussed everything from health, sports, trade and industry, migration, climate change, general political issues, science and technology, conflict resolution, economic issues, corporate responsibility and so on,” she said.“On the political front we have discussed both bilateral matters, issues on the African agenda and multilateral issues. Of course, issues on the multilateral agenda, included particularly Sudan and all its facets and the one you are all waiting for – Zimbabwe.”During talks, the two ministers agreed that 2008 was a critical year for development as South Africa was halfway towards achieving its Millennium Development Goals (MDG) — the deadline for which is 2015. The goals are set out by the United Nations and cover issues such as health, education and poverty.The UK is South Africa’s largest trading partner in Europe. The forum for bilateral talks was formed in 2000 with a view to regulate and enhance political and economic relations between South Africa and the UK.During the talks a number of resolutions were made:Climate changeThe ministers stressed the importance of pursuing sustainable, low carbon growth. They acknowledged that current climate change trends would undermine the conditions necessary for economic growth in both the developed and developing worlds, making it extremely difficult to achieve the MDG.They acknowledged that a global transition to a low-carbon economy was both affordable and achievable, and presented many opportunities for developing the environmental sector of the economy. It was stressed that a global climate change agreement was needed, which would support long-term cooperative and domestic action from nations worldwide.ZimbabweDuring the meeting Miliband and Dlamini-Zuma discussed the political crisis in Zimbabwe and both condemned the ongoing violence and intimidation there.The two ministers also noted the decision of the Summit of the African Union on Zimbabwe and the respective governments’ stated positions on that issue. They reaffirmed the importance of dialogue between the Movement for Democratic Change and Zanu-PF to establish a lasting solution that reflects the democratic will of the Zimbabwean people.During his visit, Miliband also delivered a keynote address at the University of South Africa, where he discussed the Zimbabwe issue at length.He acknowledged that Britain may have erred during its colonial rule in Zimbabwe, but that what happened in the past did not stop it from condemning the current situation. “Britain has long and historical links with Zimbabwe. I have never believed that the rights and wrongs of our history should prevent us from speaking clearly and frankly about the situation today,” he said.“[President] Robert Mugabe’s misrule does not invalidate the struggle for independence; our colonial history does not mean we cannot denounce what is wrong.”Miliband noted that free and fair elections were only the basics of a free democracy. He said that President Mugabe’s victory in what had been dubbed the “one man election” defeated the basic fundamentals that govern democracy.He said it was encouraging to see the vast majority of African leaders had spoken out against the pre- and post-election violence in June 2008.HealthSouth Africa’s health minister Dr Manto Tshabalala-Msimang and her UK counterpart, Dawn Primarolo, met to discuss ways in which the two countries would continue working together to share information and expertise on education and training of healthcare professionals.This followed the health ministers renewing a memorandum of understanding that exists between the two countries. The understanding covers a range of healthcare issues, including the ethical recruitment of workers in the sector.“Many countries have learned from our example of ethical recruitment of health workers, and indeed, admire such an effective example of bilateral cooperation,” Tshabalala-Msimang said.South Africa stressed that although Britain was free to recruit South African doctors and nurses, it was important the country was not left stripped of its workforce. The two nations have agreement to work systematically on the issue.The understanding, which was due to expire in October 2008, has been renewed for another five years. More clauses have been included in the agreement, which will explore new areas of health the UK and South Africa could be involved in.Other issues that the two foreign ministers addressed included persisting conflicts on the continent in Abyei, south Sudan, as well as the lack of progress in Darfur. On a positive note, the ministers welcomed the recent signing of the Djibouti Agreement between the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia and the Alliance for the Re-Liberation of Somalia. This was described as an important milestone on the road to a peaceful Somalia.Useful LinksDepartment of Foreign AffairsBritish Foreign and Commonwealth OfficeMillennium Development goals Do you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at khanyim@mediaclubsouthafrica.comlast_img read more


first_img1 August 2014Centre Benele Makwezela will make her test debut for the Springbok Women in the team’s opening Women’s Rugby World Cup clash against Australia at the French Rugby Federation in Marcoussis on Friday afternoon.Makwezela participated in the Rugby World Cup Sevens in Moscow last year and made her first appearance for the Springbok Women on the team’s Rugby World Cup warm-up tour to London and France in June and July where she featured in the matches against the Nomads.ExperienceNine players in Sephaka’s match 22 played in the 2010 Women’s Rugby World Cup in London, while five of them – captain and number eight Mandisa Williams, flank Lamla Momoti, prop Cebisa Kula, replacement scrumhalf Fundiswa Plaatjie and replacement flyhalf Zandile Nojoko – also participated in the 2006 World Cup in Canada.Five of the players in the squad, meanwhile, made their test debuts against France in July on the warm-up tour, including fullback Cindy Cant and lock Celeste Adonis.‘Horses for courses’“Our approach for this World Cup is horses for courses, and we believe that this team is best suited to the way we would like to play against Australia,” coach Lawrence Sephaka said in a statement.“This match 22 has a good mix of youth and experience, which is ideal. The World Cup experience is particularly important because this is a big occasion for the team and for the individuals, so it is important to have players who can guide the youngsters when necessary.”DelightedSephaka said he was delighted for Makwezela and he hoped the fact that she would play her first test in a Rugby World Cup would make the occasion more memorable.“Benele played very well against the Nomads in London and she was unlucky not to be selected to face France in July,” he added, “but she has put in a lot of extra work since that tour to show us what she is capable of and it paid off.“It is a special moment for any player to make their debut and to achieve this in a World Cup is particularly special, so I wish her the best of luck.”Tough onslaughtZoning in on the match, Sephaka said he expected a tough onslaught from Australia and said his charges had to be strong in all areas of the game to start the World Cup on a high note.The last time the teams met was in the final pool match of the 2010 World Cup and the result was a 0-62 defeat for South Africa. But Sephaka said his team had more to offer this time around.‘A quality team’“Australia are a quality team with skillful backs and powerful forwards, so we will be tested in all facets of our game,” he reckoned. “We are particularly wary of their game-breakers in the backline, and we know that they will punish us if we make mistakes. So it is important for us to deliver solid set pieces and use our possession well.“We also need to remain focused for the full 80 minutes to achieve our goal of starting the World Cup on a strong note. We have worked hard in the last few months to improve our standard of play and if we play to our potential I believe we can do well.”Television broadcastThe match will be broadcast live on SuperSport 1 at 15:45, and can also be livestreamed from www.rwcwomens.com.SPRINGBOK TEAM15 Cindy Cant, 14 Veroeshka Grain, 13 Benele Makwezela, 12 Lorinda Brown, 11 Phumeza Gadu, 10 Zenay Jordaan (vice-captain), 9 Tayla Kinsey, 8 Mandisa Williams (captain), 7 Vuyolwethu Vazi, 6 Lamla Momoti, 5 Cindy Booi, 4 Celeste Adonis, 3 Cebisa Kula, 2 Denita Wentzel, 1 Asithandile NtoyantoSubstitutes16 Thantaswa Macingwana, 17 Nwabisa Ngxatu, 18 Andrea Mentoor, 19 Shona-Leah Weston, 20 Fundiswa Plaatjie, 21 Zandile Nojoko, 22 Siviwe BasweniSAinfo reporterlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I hunted with a cat the other evening. I was after deer while the feline was stalking smaller mammals as I watched it undetected from my treestand above its perch. We shared a small swamp flanked by harvested bean and corn fields and accessed by narrow, overgrown fencerows connecting to wood lots. The farmer had left some standing corn and beans in the corners and around a wind-fallen ash tree, and the bonus grain and cover was a magnet to the local game, both feathered and furred.I know fellows who say they shoot feral cats when they see them in the field, taking care to target felines that are far from any farmhouse where they might double as pets. The argument is that the cats have gone native and, with no natural predators, ravage local game- and song-bird populations. You may have read about some recent studies done on the subject. I did, and have invited one feral cat expert on to my show next month to learn more about the issue. I’ll welcome Matt Clayton to Buckeye Sportsman on the Dec. 9 broadcast.I watched that cat as it crept up to the end of a branch off a fallen tree, settling in from that higher vantage point much the way I had in my stand 17 feet above. While I had the benefit of head to toe woodland camouflage to blend in with our shared surroundings, the feline had an unfortunate coloration: pure white but for a tail ringed like a raccoon and a pair of grown eye patches. You could see the stark-white predator working its way through the brush and stalks from clear across the field. The poor cat’s unnatural camo couldn’t be worse, I thought, then shuddered with a blast of the north wind that found its way down the back of my neck. That’s when it occurred to me that when the snow flies and living off the land is at its leanest, that cat’s coat will fit right in when it needs it the most. I wished the feline luck as it eventually padded off into a thick clump of timothy, and I sat shivering ‘til dark waiting for game that never showed. Waterfowl IDSpeaking of hunting, with waterfowl seasons in full swing across the state as Ohio’s duck and goose seasons begin, hunters are encouraged to familiarize themselves with waterfowl identification before heading out. Ohio waterfowl hunters frequently encounter a variety of species of birds when in the field and marsh, and some species of ducks, geese and swans may look similar.Some species, like the state-threatened trumpeter swans and occasionally migrating tundra swans, are protected and may be encountered. Although waterfowl hunters in Ohio rarely encounter snow geese, hunters should still be able to distinguish between swans and snow geese. With proper species identification and attention, there should be little confusion between the species. Trumpeter swan (threatened and protected species)• Mature birds have pure-white plumage (sometime stained heads) and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4 to 5 feet with a wingspan of 7 feet and weight of 17 to 28 pounds. Tundra swan (protected species)• Mature birds have pure- white plumage and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4.5 feet with a wingspan of 5.5 feet and weight of 8 to 23 pounds. Canada goose (legal game species)• Black-necked plumage with chin strap, black head, tan breast, brown back, long necks• Length of 2.5 to 3.5 feet with a wingspan of 4 to 5.5 feet, and weight of 6.5 to 20 pounds. Snow goose (legal game species)• White with black wing tips, short necks relative to the body size• Length of 2.5 feet with a wingspan of 4.5 feet and weight 3.5 to 7 pounds.For more information about waterfowl hunting in Ohio visit wildohio.gov.last_img read more


first_imgDog and dog’s best friend, CacheDweebDid you know there are groups of gadget cache builders who slave away, day after day, week after week, huddled deep inside cluttered garages, endlessly tinkering with magnets, locks, pulleys, springs, clasps, and other such bric-a-brac? They do this for you, to put a smile on your face, and in turn, an even bigger smile on their own. Meet one such clever cache creator, CacheDweeb. His claw-machine, drawer-popping, and sound-enhanced DONKEY KACHE was featured as a Geocache of the Week. We ask a few questions, get a few answers, and learn the method behind the madness of this master cache owner. Geocache of the Week: DONKEY CACHEGeocaching HQ: What’s your background outside of geocaching?CacheDweeb: I work in IT. I’m not an engineer, but I love tinkering with things and figuring how stuff works. I like biking, hiking, and kayaking and besides geocaching, my hobbies include woodworking and building/flying giant scale radio controlled airplanes.CacheDweeb at a kayak event GC766XYGeocaching HQ: How and when did you hear about geocaching?CacheDweeb: My brother introduced me to geocaching in 2015. He had been doing it for 6 months, and then explained it to me while we were on a camping trip. After going out and finding a few caches with him, I was hooked. I already hike/bike/kayak, so geocaching just adds more to outdoor adventures.Geocaching HQ: What got you hooked?CacheDweeb: After finding about 200 caches, I happened to stumble across one of WVTim’s gadget cache videos. Once I saw that, those were the caches that I wanted to find. Not having anything like that in my immediate area, I decided to build a gadget cache and put it out. The local cachers loved it. Since then that’s what I’ve been building and placing.Geocaching HQ: What keeps you engaged in the game?CacheDweeb: I think what keeps me engaged are my friends. Since I’ve started geocaching, I met a lot of great cachers who are now some of my closest friends. I don’t get out to cache as often as I like, but I belong to a committee called the C-Mass Geofest (Central Massachusetts) who work with the Sturbridge Tourist Association and the Chamber of Commerce. We’ve been hosting large Event Caches for four years now.I also belong to a local Gadget Cache Builders group. It is a secret closed group on Facebook, with about 25 gadget cache builders, including WVTim. It is strictly for builders only, as the information on there is all spoilers. We share our projects, our skills and experience, and our friendships. They are all a great group of people.Geocaching HQ: For you, what makes a quality cache?CacheDweeb: One that is well maintained and fits its surroundings, whether it’s camouflaged or in plain sight. Of course, I love gadget caches, but I also like ‘unique’ hides, or what I call “something other than Tupperware”.Geocaching HQ: What’s the best approach to take when creating a geocache?CacheDweeb: I think the best approach is to choose materials for the container which blend in with its surroundings, and most of all, hold up to the climate it is placed in. As far as the best approach to creating gadget caches, you need to make them as bullet-proof as possible. Use materials that will hold up to a large number of cachers poking, pulling, and pushing everything on it. Also, you need to select the correct materials for the type of climate it will be in. For example, here in New England, we get everything from heat, wet, cold, and chill-to-the-bone frozen. Using wood for push/pull rods or slides won’t last because the wood swells in the humidity. You can use plastic or metal, which will work better and last much longer. Also, you need to test, test, test before you have your gadget cache published. I have my muggle family and friends test my gadget caches so I can see what works and what might need improvement.Think it, build it, test it, hide it. Oh, and maintain it!Geocaching HQ: Do you find it difficult to perform maintenance on gadget caches?CacheDweeb: In the beginning, yes. After many builds, you learn to spot problem areas before they become problems. The right materials are key. For example, rather than using kite string through pulleys, you’re better off using high-strength fishing line since it’s much more durable and will last a lot longer than any other string. I found this out the hard way on my DONKEY KACHE gadget cache. It was published just before a large event. The original string originally could not hold up to the wear and tear of so many cachers using it on one weekend. Geocaching HQ: Have you ever had an idea that you thought was impossible?CacheDweeb: Sure, all the time! As a builder, I keep a notebook that I add ideas to, so I don’t forget them. And they come to you in the oddest places. Once I was at my nephew’s hockey game. After the game, some of his teammates skated over to get off the ice and pushed down on a button on the top of the rink gate. On the outside of the gate where I was standing, it was open, so you could see how everything worked. At that moment, I had no idea what I would ever use that locking mechanism for, but I just had to take a photo of it with my phone for my “You never know” folder.Geocaching HQ: Do you have any great ideas brewing?CacheDweeb: This year, I started learning how to code caches with sound effects. Since I have a background as an IT developer with various code languages, the learning curve was easy. I’m building a payphone gadget cache that will ring and accept certain phone numbers. It should be out in the spring of 2019.Geocaching HQ: If someone was looking to you for inspiration what would you tell them?CacheDweeb: You don’t necessarily need to have skills or power tools to put out a creative cache. You just need your imagination. It doesn’t have to be as complicated as a gadget cache. I think the average cacher would rather find a unique container over Tupperware any day.CacheDweeb is number one!Geocaching HQ: Thanks so much for talking with us. Any last thoughts on geocaching?CacheDweeb: The great thing about geocaching is you can do it pretty much anywhere. If you’re on a business trip, or out on vacation somewhere, you can always take a look around to find out if there are any caches nearby. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedDONKEY KACHE — Geocache of the WeekDecember 19, 2018In “Community”Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniacMarch 12, 2019In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Auburn Sea (GC3QGYZ) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 3, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more


first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Related Posts Identity is crucial, as Schuermans stresses, because it keeps users engaged with Facebook even if they aren’t actively sharing: “If users don’t just use Facebook as their social network, but also to access scores of unrelated services, then it will be hard for users to drop Facebook entirely.”By making Facebook the center of our digital lives, Facebook makes itself an essential, profitable place for developers to build. 3. Out-Googling Google For Effective Mobile AdvertisingIn Facebook’s quest to sell user reach, engagement and hyper-targeting to advertisers, thereby enriching its developer community and itself, Facebook may be out-Googling Google. In particular, Facebook’s App Links builds bridges between apps, thereby creating a new, searchable application web to rival the non-app web. Schuermans writes:In the most optimistic case, Applinks will allow Facebook to build the PageRank of mobile, a head-on attack on its arch rival. (Facebook has already kindly offered to host an index of all applinks.) At worst, Applinks can substantially boost Facebook’s app install business (CPI) through affiliate marketing schemes, earning revenue on each referral.All Your Developers Are Belong To UsFacebook, once the mobile laggard, is now a mobile leader, particularly with developers. While it still has a long way to go, its strategy of making it easy for developers to build for its platform, coupled with its efforts to make applications an effective advertising target, is winning over developers and stealing a march on Google and Apple. Image of Mark Zuckerberg by Flickr user kris krüg, CC 2.0 It’s a good thing mobile app developers say they’re not in it for the money, because the reality is that the average per-app revenue is under $4,000, according to VisionMobile’s 2012 developer survey. Given the difficulty of standing out on “brutally competitive” mobile app stores like Apple’s App Store or Google Play, it’s easy to see why developers struggle to make much money from their work. There are more than a million apps on the App Store: how likely is it that yours will be the next Angry Birds?Enter FacebookSensing an opportunity, Facebook has pounced. While Facebook used to get knocked for being too dependent on desktop revenue, the company has completely shifted its strategy so that today it generates more than 60% of its revenues from mobile. The heart of Facebook’s mobile strategy is developers.And the way to appeal to developers, says analyst Ben Thompson, is money:One of the key lessons I learned working with developers is that, at the end of the day, everything pales in comparison to the question: “How do I make money?” Developer tools are important, languages are important, exposure is important, but if there isn’t money to be made—or if more money can be made elsewhere—then you’re not going to get very far in getting developers on your platform.Facebook’s mobile developer strategy is comprised of three components, according to Schuermans, each geared toward making developers more money:1. Building A Mega SDKFacebook has been acquiring companies at a torrid pace these past few years, but not for their developer communities. As VisionMobile founder Andreas Constantinou rightly posits, ecosystems aren’t for sale:Instead of buying developers, Facebook has been acquiring essential tools to serve a growing community of developers, including Monoidics (bug checking), Parse (back-end as a service), Airlock (A/B testing framework) and more. To these acquisitions Facebook has added homegrown services to support app promotion, monetization and re-engagement. Facebook, in other words, is gearing up to make app development easy and profitable for mobile developers, recognizing that traditional app stores have done little but provide a weak app discovery mechanism for developers. 2. Making Facebook The Center Of Users’ Digital IdentitiesIt’s interesting to note that identity topped Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s list of the essential elements of a “cross-platform platform” at the recent F8 developer conference: Tags:#app developers#Apple#Facebook#Google#iOS How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees?center_img Developers who want to make money may want to spend less time with Apple and Google and more time with Facebook. Though both Google and Apple trumpet their vast app ecosystems, the reality is that it’s hard for app developers to stand out on these platforms and, hence, egregiously difficult for such developers to make a living. Unless they want to focus on Facebook, that is. As VisionMobile analyst Stijn Schuermans highlights, while app developers will continue to depend on Google and Apple for distribution, Facebook’s mobile developer strategy is better suited to help them reach users, get discovered and make money.Mobile’s Crowd Of IndividualsApple has paid developers over $15 billion since launching the App Store in July 2008. While Google’s Android platform has not been as generous historically, it’s catching up. But neither is a particularly great way to make money for most developers, as VisionMobile’s data indicates: Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Matt Asay Why You Love Online Quizzeslast_img read more


first_imgRecently the FD Early Intervention team was able to sit down with Carol M. Trivette, PhD., an associate professor at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, TN.   In this short video she shares her thoughts on how early interventionists can best support military families facing deployment.Carol says, “Deployment can be a time of stress for families and when there is a child with a disability, it can be even more stressful. However you can reduce some of this stress by helping a parent identify successful strategies that were used in the past and new strategies the parent might want to try during the upcoming deployment. Taking the time to really listen to what a parent wants to share about previous deployment experiences including who helped, how daily routines and activities were accomplished as well as what challenges they encountered is an key first step in supporting families through this experience.”Carol M. Trivette, PhD earned her degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Child Development and Family Relations. She provided direct supports to children with disabilities and their families in home-base programs and in classrooms and was the director of an early intervention program. During most of her career, she has also been involved in applied research. Her research interests focus on identifying evidence-based practices for working with children and families in the areas of responsive parental interactions with their children with disabilities, children’s early language and literacy development, family-centered practices and family support, and the development of tools and scales to support the implementation of evidence-based practices with fidelity. She is currently an Associate Professor at East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, where she works mainly with doctoral students focused on enhancing their research skills.This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Amy Santos, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more