first_imgSamuel T. Grossman, 31, of Palm Springs, California, passed away December 31, 2019 surrounded by his loved ones.  Sam was born July 16, 1988 in Lafayette, Indiana, the son of Lori Wise and Tony Grossman.  Sam spent his youth in Batesville, Indiana and graduated from Batesville High School in 2007.  While in school, he ran cross country and was a vital member of the high school’s swim team.  He enjoyed skiing at Perfect North Slopes and going on ski trips with friends.Sam continued his education at Purdue University and Loyola University Chicago where he completed his degree with honors in Economics in 2011. He pursued post-graduate studies in quantitative finance at Fordham University.After living in New York City for several years, Sam moved to Palm Springs.  There he met numerous close friends that he no doubt considered family and also his loving partner Brien.  He and Brien loved to hike together and were Disneyland season pass holders.Sam is survived by his parents, Lori Wise (Gary) and Tony Grossman (Marjorie Schoelles-Grossman); partner, Brien O’Brien; brother, Evan Grossman (Ali); sister, Suzanne Grossman (Erin Reister); aunt, Lisa Love; nieces, Logan and Parker Mejia; maternal grandmother, Suzanne Love; paternal grandmother, Marty Ellen Grossman; step-siblings, Megan Jordan (JW) and Michael Wise (Megan); step-nieces and nephews, John and Ruby Jordan,  Morgan and Marley Wise; along with numerous cousins, aunts, uncles and countless friends.He is preceded in death by his maternal grandfather, Frank Love and his paternal grandfather, Leonard Grossman.Friends and family may call on Friday, January 17, 2020 from 4-5:30pm followed by a 5:30pm Celebration of Life Memorial Service for Samuel, all at Meyers Funeral Home in Batesville.    Rev. Tom Sweets officiating.  A service in Palm Springs will take place on January 25, 2020.Memorials may be given to the Desert AIDS Project in Palm Springs, CA https://www.desertaidsproject.org/support-our-mission/ or Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, CA https://www.hazeldenbettyford.org/donateOnline condolences www.meyersfuneralhomes.comlast_img read more


first_imgA new year and new opponents await the University of Wisconsin football team, and many critics are saying this year is going to be a walk in the park for the Badgers.Many people, however, seem to have forgotten that nothing ever seems to come easily for this Wisconsin team. Starting off the season with the departures of some of the most talented players and injuries already plaguing this team, this year seems like it is going to be a bit of a struggle for UW.Football: Jack Cichy to miss 2017 seasonThe University of Wisconsin Athletic Department announced Thursday morning senior Jack Cichy will miss the 2017 season due to a Read…The problemsFor starters, there are not that many games against any of the major Big Ten East teams. With Ohio State, Michigan State and Penn State all missing from this year’s schedule, the Badgers are not going to get much quality experience from the Big Ten East.This experience is necessary for the Badgers if they want to make it back to the Big Ten tournament this year — and win. With so many power schools missing from this year’s schedule, Wisconsin will find themselves going into Indianapolis this year with little practical experience against the team they will be facing.One of the other problems is their opening, non-conference schedule. The Badgers are facing three relatively inexperienced schools who will offer little to no insight on UW’s weaknesses. Schools like Florida Atlantic, who the Badgers will play Sept. 9th, will most likely be a walk in the park.Football preview: What to expect from the Badgers this seasonThe University of Wisconsin football team enters the 2017 season with high expectations and hopes of replicating, or even exceeding, Read…This does not help when you consider that after these three games, Wisconsin will face Northwestern in their first Big Ten game of the season. Northwestern has an even better non-conference schedule than Wisconsin, playing Bowling Green, Duke and Nevada within the first three weeks of play — which will help them in the long run.This means that the Badgers will have to fix their mistakes immediately if they want to keep their Big Ten record competitive enough to ensure their spot at the Big Ten Championship game. That kind of pressure could be suffocating for the team, and it means that one small mistake could be a disaster for this teamThe benefitsSince Wisconsin doesn’t see much of the Big Ten East, that also means they will save their record from some potential losses. Not seeing schools like Michigan State, Ohio State and Penn State means Wisconsin will not have to worry so much week to week about their record and their standings within the Big Ten.Another benefit of not seeing the Big Ten East as much this year is that it lowers the chances of injuries happening. Schools like Penn State and Ohio State tend to be aggressive defensively, which can lead to injuries. Injuries like these, which tend to happens late in the season, can be devastating when proceeding into the later part of December.The worst part of the schedule The last two weeks of the regular season are probably the toughest for Wisconsin. The Badgers will close out their home season run against Michigan, which is arguably one of the best teams in the Big Ten. While this game does take place in Camp Randall, it also means that the Badgers could end their season on a bad note while home.The next weekend of the schedule is not much better, with Wisconsin heading to Minneapolis to take on Minnesota. Typically, the Battle for the Axe is an intense game to begin with, but taking on the Gophers at home is going to be one of the more tougher games this season.Football: Chryst’s 100th win begins slowly, develops momentum in second halfWhile the first game of the season might have resulted in a win, the University of Wisconsin football team definitely Read…Wisconsin is looking at taking the Axe home for the thirteenth year, and taking on the Gophers in the heart of TCF Bank stadium is one of the hardest challenges known to Badger football.After those two games, the Badgers hope to head into the Big Ten Conference game, which will hopefully result in the Badgers heading to Pasadena for the Rose Bowl in January.What the Badgers are sayingJazz Peavy“We are in the Big Ten, and it’s not like we’re second class to any division in this league. Any game is a game that we have to prepare for. Nothing is ever going to come easy to us.”Sarah Godfrey/The Badger HeraldChris James“The Big Ten, overall, is well-rounded. Even a 3-10 team can compete [against the best teams]. This is a tough division. The east division is extremely tough, with Michigan, Ohio State and Michigan State all in the same division. Ohio State and Michigan used to play in the Big Ten championship game, but now they can’t. Those match-ups cause a lot of ruckus and a lot of upsets.”Natrell Jamerson“A lot of people doubt our defense, especially after losing so many great players. We feel like our defense is even better than last year. People just doubt our team in general. We’re trying to do a lot more than we did last year.”last_img read more


first_imgStill recovering from the 2010 earthquake that killed more than 250,000 people, Haiti has recorded 20 earthquakes during the first four months of this year. Director of the Bureau of Mines and Energy (BME), Claude Prepetit, told reporters that the BME’s Technical Unit of Seismology (UTS) recorded about 20 earthquakes with magnitudes between 3.1 and 4.6 with the majority occurring at depths between 10 and 25 kilometers (km).The UTS said that following the magnitude 7.2 earthquake that hit western Mexico, in February, it recorded at least six earthquakes west of Gonâve Island.Prepetit said that earthquakes are caused by the convergence of the Caribbean plate and the North American plate and Haiti is concerned by two major seismic faults alongside other minor faults.He said while earthquakes are not predictable, the authorities here have taken measures to minimize damage.In January 2010, the 7.0 earthquake caused widespread destruction to buildings. The authorities said they had also recorded 52 aftershocks measuring 4.5 or greater 123 days after the catastrophic quake.last_img read more