first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 15, 2010 at 12:00 pm Just outside the Syracuse locker room last Saturday against Washington, minutes after a disappointing loss, Delone Carter tried to put the outcome into perspective. Missed opportunities had deflated the optimism that accompanied SU to Seattle. Frustration began to set in. But despite the loss, and the pain that followed, the senior running back wasn’t seeing the setback as a repeat of years past. Not even close. ‘I feel no team is the same. I feel like we define ourselves,’ Carter said. ‘We’re going to continue to define ourselves. … Positively.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Days have passed, but the feelings remain. And now, Carter and his teammates enter this weekend looking to eliminate the feelings following that disappointing loss in Seattle. And with emotion from last Saturday’s drubbing still lingering, Syracuse (1-1) will attempt to restore its pride in its home opener against Maine (1-1) at 7:15 p.m. Saturday inside the Carrier Dome. ‘We just want to get back into this week and improve and take another step forward and get another win,’ Carter said Wednesday. ‘Just the next opponent, that’s all it is.’ Getting the bad taste out of its mouth is just one of the goals for the Orange heading into Saturday’s contest. SU hasn’t won a home opener since 2004 — the last time it made an appearance in a bowl game. Taking care of business this weekend would certainly be a big step toward that postseason berth head coach Doug Marrone and his players have been vocal about since preseason camp. Before last weekend, Syracuse looked like it might be a bowl-caliber team this season. The Orange dismantled Akron on the road, 29-3, and the defense looked as good as it has in years. But against Washington, SU struggled for the final three quarters. The defense allowed five touchdowns against the Huskies after allowing zero against Akron. The Orange went from having a 10-point lead to losing by three touchdowns. Erasing the pain from last week’s poor performance will be on the minds of the coaches and players. ‘It hurt,’ Marrone said at his weekly press conference Monday. ‘Any time you lose a game, it hurts. If it doesn’t hurt, then you don’t have the right culture. … It is like anything else in life, how you deal with adversity, how you deal with failure and how you come back from that.’ Syracuse and Maine faced each other for the first time in 2009, with SU winning decisively, 41-24, at the Dome. Carter led the Orange offense with 72 yards and three touchdowns on 19 carries, while Derrell Smith led the defense with 11 tackles. Against the Black Bears Saturday, both should play a pivotal role. In spite of two rather unimpressive performances to start the season, the Maine defense is only allowing 3.1 yards per carry against the run. Carter and backfield mate Antwon Bailey will have to increase their production for the Orange to win that battle. Offensively, Maine averaged 186.5 yards rushing in those first two games behind the running of Jared Turcotte and Pushaun Brown. Smith and the Syracuse defense — which has allowed 157 yards per game against the run — will have their work cut out for them. ‘We know we’ll get their best when they come in here,’ Marrone said. ‘I have a lot of respect for (Maine head coach Jack) Cosgrove and that football team. … They’re always big, they’re always tough, they’re always physical and then, after last year, we have to expect the unexpected anywhere on the field.’ Despite Maine’s strong points, the Black Bears are still an FCS school. The Syracuse players are well aware of that fact. Yet after a painful loss at Washington, SU is heading into this weekend not taking anybody lightly. And while the players insist Maine is ‘just the next opponent,’ it’s quite possible SU is planning to take out its frustration on what it knows is an inferior opponent. That will be a key factor Saturday. ‘We’re trying to change history and change the culture here,’ SU receiver Van Chew said. ‘So getting a big win will be good.’ All week long, players and coaches were chomping at the bit to get back on the field. To prove last week’s loss was a fluke. To quickly regain that optimistic feeling that had suddenly evaporated. Maine was shut out, 3-0, by Albany to start this season. Not exactly the evidence to suggest it should pose a threat to a Syracuse squad salivating at a chance for redemption. And after starting the season with two games on the road, SU returns home against the same Maine team it throttled in the second half a year ago. Perhaps it’s the perfect situation to begin erasing any doubts about its bowl legitimacy this season. Said Marrone: ‘We expect them to come back, give us their best effort, and get ready to win a game and go above .500.’ aljohn@syr.educenter_img Commentslast_img read more


first_img Related Stories Boston College 1-hits Syracuse in 3rd game of weekend series sweep Published on May 1, 2016 at 9:07 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 The Boston College dugout erupted after Jessie Daulton belted a two-run double off the “New York’s College Team” sign in center field. It was only the third inning, but the hit — already BC’s 10th — gave the Eagles a 5-0 lead.But that would be the end of Boston College’s offensive threat. Syracuse’s Jocelyn Cater relieved AnnaMarie Gatti in the next inning and shut down the red hot Eagles. She came in with two runners on and just one out, but struck out back-to-back hitters to end the inning. Her second strikeout had Taylor Coroneos fishing for a ball in the dirt.“You’re just trying to stop the bleeding at that point,” SU head coach Mike Bosch said. “To her credit, (Cater) was much more confident on the mound today.”Despite Boston College’s (28-21, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) 6-0 win over Syracuse (27-24, 9-14) on Sunday at SU Softball Stadium, Cater silenced the Eagles’ offense. In 3 2/3 innings of work, she allowed two hits and one run to a team that had had back-to-back multi-run innings.In the series opener on Saturday, Cater allowed seven runs on 11 hits across four innings. She left balls up in the zone, walked three batters and hit two en route to earning her ninth loss of the season. On Sunday, though, she had much better command of her pitches.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCater worked inside and outside effectively, inducing soft grounders and fly balls. Regardless of the count, she went to her changeup much more than she did Saturday to keep BC hitters off balance.“Generally I haven’t been comfortable with the change(up) on 3-2,” Cater said, “but that’s kind of what we had to do for them. We risked a couple walks just to mix it up because that’s how we got to them. They were hitting everything we had.”She did walk three, but she located her fastball and changeup well. BC hitters were aggressive all game, not afraid to swing at pitches off the plate or early in the count. They were also anxious at times, rolling over grounders or leaning forward on swing-and-misses down in the zone.In the seventh inning, Cater induced three consecutive fly outs against Annie Murphy, Tatiana Cortez and Chloe Sharabba — BC’s two, three and four hitters. The trio had a combined five hits on the day, but Cater sent them down in order.Cortez, whose .374 batting average ranks second on the team, had hit Cater hard on Saturday. Whether Cater threw it inside, outside, high or low, Cortez “rocketed it.” So during one at-bat, Cater threw Cortez four consecutive changeups. It worked.“I just thought that she had command of it and with their bigger hitter up, they had been sitting on the hard stuff all day,” said assistant coach Kristyn Sandberg, SU’s pitch caller. “The last thing you’re going to expect is four changeups in a row.”While Cater didn’t get a decision, she relieved Gatti and kept BC at bay. Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


first_imgVideo assistant referee system (VAR) replays will be displayed to fans during this season’s FA Cup semi-finals at Wembley if a decision is overturned.VAR’s decision will be announced on the big screen before a “definitive video clip” is shown.It comes after criticism that decisions are sometimes unclear for fans inside stadiums.The Football Association said it would provide “clarity” and “transparency” for those in attendance.“The FA Cup has been at the forefront VAR testing process in England and this is the next step in its development,” said Andy Ambler, the FA’s director of professional game relations.Replays of incidents reviewed by VAR were shown on big screens at the 2018 World Cup in Russia.VAR has been used regularly in FA Cup ties over the past two seasons, making its debut in English football in Brighton’s third-round win over Crystal Palace on 8 January, 2018.It will be in use for both semi-finals this weekend as well as the final on 18 May. Manchester City face Brighton on Saturday before Watford play Wolves on Sunday.Last month, Swansea players bemoaned the lack of VAR during their FA Cup quarter-final exit as Man City’s equaliser was a contentious penalty and their winning goal looked to be offside.VAR was not in use despite the Liberty Stadium being equipped for it.The system is only being used in this season’s FA Cup at Premier League grounds. It will be used in the Premier League from next season.–Source: BBClast_img read more