first_imgEmmanuel Petit has had enough of Emery at the Emirates (Picture: Getty Images)‘Arsene Wenger built this club for 20 years and there was concern as generation after generation came and went. But now they look like an average team without any inspiration or creativity – and I don’t think that’s solely down to the players.‘My opinion is that most of the players have given up on Emery, so it’s time for him to go.‘I watched the game against Leicester and Arsenal looked terrible. They had no spirit, no hunger, nothing at all. I wondered to myself, “What is going on at this club? What is happening to this club?”’Arsenal’s head of football Raul Sanllehi gave Emery the dreaded vote of confidence on Monday, and Petit believes this just proves that the hierarchy at the Emirates are ready to pull the trigger on the former PSG boss.‘What the club came out and said about Emery’s job being safe is not true at all,’ said the World Cup winning midfielder.‘This is a political answer and most of the time when I hear officials or shareholders talk like this it’s proof for me that they’re already thinking about sacking the manager. It’s the opposite of what they’re saying that might be true.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityIt was reported on Tuesday that Emery is not about to get the sack, but he has less than two months to save his job.Arsenal host Manchester United in the Premier League on New Year’s Day and if they are not in with a realistic chance of making the top four after that contest then Emery will likely lose his job.MORE: Arsenal board give ultimatum to Unai EmeryMORE: Patrick Vieira backs Granit Xhaka to play again for Arsenal and slams his critics Comment Phil HaighTuesday 12 Nov 2019 6:36 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link148Shares Unai Emery is under increasing pressure at Arsenal (Picture: REUTERS)The Arsenal squad has completely lost faith in Unai Emery and it is time for him to be sacked as manager, according to Gunners hero Emmanuel Petit.It has been a very tough few weeks for Emery, with Arsenal now without a win in five games after defeat to Leicester City in the Premier League on Saturday evening.The Gunners may only be sixth in the table, which does not seem disastrous, but with just four wins from 12 Premier League matches, and already eight points off the top four, things look quite bleak at the Emirates.A negative goal difference is a worrying sign for the red half of north London, as is the seeming disharmony in the squad, epitomised by Granit Xhaka being stripped of the club captaincy after a spat with fans.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTPetit believes that enough is enough and that it is time for Emery to be dismissed from the Emirates dugout.‘I believe it’s time for Unai Emery to leave Arsenal,’ the Frenchman told Paddy Power. ‘The results are not good at all. I don’t recognise this team any more and I don’t recognise this club any more. Advertisement Arsenal players have given up on Unai Emery and the board are ready to sack him, says Emmanuel Petit Advertisementlast_img read more


first_imgThe Football Association has confirmed that Southampton have been charged with failing to control their players following the award of a penalty to Norwich during Saturday’s Barclays Premier League match at Carrow Road. Press Association After consulting with his assistant, referee Mark Clattenburg ruled that Luke Shaw pushed Grant Holt just inside the penalty area. Holt missed the subsequent spot-kick with Artur Boruc keeping out his effort, but Southampton players continued to protest after the final whistle, and were joined on the pitch by manager Mauricio Pochettino. center_img The club has until 4pm on Friday to respond to the charge. last_img read more


first_img Published on November 29, 2015 at 7:31 pm Scott Shafer fought back tears as silence permeated throughout the room. Missy Shafer voiced words of encouragement from the back, helping her husband through his choked-up final words at Syracuse. The often-stern 48-year-old was the most vulnerable he’d been in three seasons as head coach, if only for a minute and 40 seconds.And just like that, as Shafer descended the steps from the podium with haste, the public got its last look at a man who was fired five days prior.“He’s an emotional person, as you know,” Floyd Little said. “I like him as a person. He did the best he could for the most part.”For the most part, it wasn’t good enough. Seven combined wins in the last two seasons. A defense that surrendered 40-plus points in each of its five road games. Two unsportsmanlike conduct penalties on him in two of the last three weeks. The recent demerits leading to Shafer’s demise will, from the outside, define a tenure that seemed to lose hope with each passing week.That’s the side of Shafer most have seen.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHis firing before Saturday’s game against Boston College provided a glimpse into what many haven’t. Parents posted pictures of Shafer in their homes, arms extended around the shoulders of their children and a smile across his face. Players both past and current expressed their support, some saying Shafer was the one who gave them a chance in life.In some ways, Director of Athletics Mark Coyle’s decision took a backseat to the human aspect as the week progressed. Outside the results-driven business of coaching emerged a man with layers beyond a 14-23 overall record.“When we would go to his house in the offseason, he would treat us just like family,” sophomore wideout Steve Ishmael said. “He was never a greedy guy and always treated us great. I love him.”Just after 11 a.m. on Saturday, Shafer trotted onto the Carrier Dome turf for the last time before a game. He spoke with Boston College assistants, aggressively clapped when a manager caught a Riley Dixon punt and chatted with two fans for about a minute before fading into the tunnel.During Senior Day ceremonies, he posed for pictures with the families of 23 players and managers honored. He raised both fists just six seconds into his postgame press conference and the emotion began pouring out. His daughter, Elsa, pressed her head against Missy’s shoulder and his son, Wolfgang, got red in his eyes.“I want to thank the community and the communities both on campus and in Syracuse, especially in Fayetteville,” Shafer said, “and all the people that have been there for Missy and I and helping us raise our two kids for the past seven years.”There are 27 children of coaches on the Syracuse staff. Some, if not most or all, will have to relocate after their fathers were displaced from jobs. The fallout from firing a coach extends beyond the race to find a replacement. It trickles into families and that may be where the brunt of the move is felt most.When Shafer kept Eric Dungey in a blowout against Louisville and the freshman suffered another head injury, Shafer was rightfully lambasted for his reasoning. When he cost Syracuse 15 yards against No. 1 Clemson, he was exposed for not sticking to his mantra of “control the controllables.” When he drew another flag for unsportsmanlike conduct against North Carolina State, he didn’t even wait to be asked about the slip-up before explaining himself.The tension surrounding his job status built up and it was justified.But even if he’s a coach with flaws plastered on him throughout an eight-game losing streak, there’s a human side.Ishmael will remember Shafer most for his enthusiasm and positivity. Zaire Franklin for his fire and emotion. Little for his “hard-nosed” style and ability to inspire. Offensive coordinator Tim Lester for a level of care for players that can’t be found in most coaches.The final evaluations had little to do with football.And after a week, and season, littered with well-documented faults that led to Shafer’s downfall, that’s how he should go out.Matt Schneidman is an Asst. Sports Editor at The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at mcschnei@syr.edu or @matt_schneidman. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


first_imgThe women’s tennis team completed their three-game homestand this weekend, defeating LMU 5-2 on Friday and falling to UCSB 6-1 on Saturday. The Women of Troy are now 2-1 on the season. In the game against UCSB, senior Gabby Smith took part in the only wins of the day, both in her singles match and in her doubles match with sophomore Becca Weissmann. Becca Weissmann returns a shot against LMU. Photo by Sonny Dong | Daily Trojan.“Even though we lost, I thought that everybody really competed well, and there are places where we can improve,” Smith said. “It was a fun match. Obviously I want to win, but I want the team to win more.”Although the loss hurt them in the standings, coach Alison Swain sees the game against UCSB and LMU as learning experiences. “I think the girls had great insight after the match and clarity about how we’re going to handle being pushed by other teams,” Swain said. “And also what we did so well against LMU and in our win against San Diego, which was coming out with a lot of focused energy and cohesiveness as a team. I think the first three matches really shined a light on how important that is for us. So we’ll take that into this weekend and our upcoming matches for sure.”Sophomore Constance Branstine and her partner, senior Madison Westby, took home the first win of the game against LMU, defeating the other team 6-0. Branstine attributes her success to their consistency. “We were making our shots and sticking to the plan, and regardless of the score — we won that, I believe, 6-0 — our plan just worked every time, and all of our hard work that we did on the court really shone that day,” Branstine said. “I think that I executed my volleys really well, and Madison has a big serve, and she set me up really well, and vice versa. We work really well together.”Branstine is a transfer student from UC Irvine this year, and appreciates the culture and atmosphere of her new team. “I think that we all have the same goals in life, and with us all wanting to get better every day, and learn from our mistakes and from every match and practices,” she said. “I think that now I’m on a team where everybody just works really hard, and I’m so happy to be part of such an amazing atmosphere every day.”The next match the Women of Troy play will be at Clemson University on Jan. 26. Swain is ready for both the challenge and the learning lesson that a top team like Clemson will present. “We’re going to travel across the country, have a time change, be in a little different setting,” Swain said. “I think all those things are actually good for us. I want our team to be gritty and adaptable. It’s early season still, these are very important matches, but we’re also going to use them, win or lose, as stepping stones.”Looking at the rest of the season, Swain is content to let the players decide on how ambitious they would like to be. “I really let the girls set the outcome goal,” she said. “I think that’s up to them, that’s something they need to put out there and believe in. For me and for our coaching staff, it’s about them determining those, and then it’s about helping them lead the path to get there.”The team’s next home game will be against Cal on Feb. 23.last_img read more


first_imgBayern Munich are lining up Jose Mourinho and Carlo Ancelotti as potential replacements should current manager Pep Guardiola leave the Bavarian club.Guardiola’s contract expires at the end of next season and the Express reports that he could be on his way to Arsenal. The ex-Barcelona manager, who won six trophies in the first year in charge of the Catalans, has been linked with Arsenal in recent times, with Arsene Wenger linked to Monaco should he choose to move on.APPOINTMENTAnd Bayern legend Lothar Matthaus has urged to the club to appoint either Mourinho or Ancelotti should Guardiola choose to head for the Premier League.He told Sport Bild: “Just like Jupp Heynckes and Louis van Gaal before him, Pep Guardiola is an alpha male as well.SUCCESS”They are all coaches who had been successful abroad. There is no coach like them available in the Bundesliga.last_img read more


first_img Gerrit Cole, Justin Verlander first teammates with 300 Ks since 2002 He said Sunday that he and Maddon discussed it and that “this type of change is a win-win”.While the losing streak that saw Chicago plummet from NL Central and wild-card contention made Epstein’s call easier, all indications had pointed to a change in the dugout, with the Cubs underachieving throughout the season in a winnable division. Once both parties move on, though, it should be easy to appreciate the role Maddon played in a nearly unprecedented run of success for the franchise. He took the Cubs to the playoffs in his first four seasons, an unprecedented achievement, and won it all in 2016. The only comparable period in Cubs history came at the turn of the previous century, with the Cubs making the World Series four times in five seasons between 1906 and 1910 and winning titles in 1907 and 1908. While Maddon’s overall success didn’t net him a second contract, he showed he could apply his unique style to a high-profile team in a high-pressure market after previously leading Tampa Bay to relevance during his nine seasons there. “I’m not narcissistic enough to think this thing is always going to go our way or my way. … Of course it’s frustrating,” Maddon said Wednesday on Chicago’s 670 The Score. “But optimistically, always trying to figure out the positive, I’m still that guy.” Justin Verlander becomes 18th pitcher with 3,000 strikeouts Joe Maddon led the Cubs to heights unseen in more than a century, including their first World Series title in 108 years, but he won’t be back next season after seeing his magic touch disappear in 2019. Maddon will not get a new contract as Cubs manager, USA Today first reported Sunday. The Cubs held a press conference Sunday afternoon confirming the news. MLB wrap: Nationals secure home-field advantage in NL wild-card game Maddon will turn 66 this offseason, but there should be a job out there for him if he wants it. The Giants, Padres and Royals already have openings, and several more managerial dominos are expected to fall in the coming days. Maddon’s availability could cause some of that movement, as it did when the Cubs fired Rick Renteria strictly because Maddon became a free agent after the 2014 season. The Athletic reported this week that the Angels could cut ties with Brad Ausmus if they have a chance to land Maddon, who spent 31 years in the organization before taking the Tampa Bay job in 2006. As for who will replace him at Wrigley Field, reports in recent weeks indicated the search might not take long, with former Cubs catcher David Ross considered the favorite to take over. Ross retired after helping the Cubs win the World Series in 2016 and has served as a special assistant in the team’s front office and as an ESPN commentator since then. Theo Epstein, on the meeting Saturday night with Joe Maddon. pic.twitter.com/eBIembfcw6— Jordan Bastian (@MLBastian) September 29, 2019Maddon’s original five-year, $25 million deal with the team expires at the end of this season. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein’s decision to let Maddon go is no surprise, as the front office had seemed to sour on Maddon even before a September collapse that saw the Cubs eliminated from playoff contention Wednesday with four games still to play.  Related Newslast_img read more