first_imgIn a series of town halls this week, University administrators announced changes to the structure of the First Year of Studies, discussed a new early retirement program and provided updates on new recycling standards and construction projects.In a response to a question about changes to the First Year of Studies, University provost Thomas Burish confirmed that the First Year of Studies would cease to operate as a separate college. Instead, he said advisors formerly from the First Year of Studies will now work with advisors from students’ majors. The core curriculum requirements will be spread over four years, rather than being concentrated in students’ first year. Additionally, students will now have the option to take courses for their major beginning their freshman year. Natalie Weber | The Observer John Affleck-Graces, executive vice president of Notre Dame, discusses reforms that the University is planning to implement in the final fall town hall held Wednesday evening held in Carey Auditorium.Burish said the changes will allow students to explore more majors by taking a variety of introductory courses during their first year. For those first year students who have already decided on a major, the new system will allow them to get a head start on their fields of study, Burish said.“You can start early, and if you made the wrong decision, you’ve got time to recover and get into another major because you have four years now to work these major decisions in,” he said.During the town hall, university administrators also announced an early retirement program for staff. Details regarding the program will be released in the next few weeks, executive vice president John Affleck-Graves said. “In essence, it will look very similar to the program we did in 2011,” he said. “Essentially, looking at people who are 62 years or older who have 10 years of service or people 55 years and older, with 15 years of service. And there will be some element of a lump sum payment that will be tied to the number of years you put in.”Staff members will have until March or April of next year to decide whether to retire early, Affleck-Graves said.The University is also implementing new recycling policies, Affleck-Graves said. In the past, recycling allowed for 10 percent contamination of materials.“Those rules have changed because the places that used to take the recycling materials will no longer take them,” Affleck-Graves said. “And so, the new rules are that we can only have a 0.5 to one percent contamination. So that’s going to change the way that we’re going to ask you to recycle.”Administrators are asking that members of the community follow the motto “When in doubt, throw it out.”“If you put that food contaminated, when you put a liquid in, you’ve destroyed the good that everybody else has done,” he said. “If everyone else is being rigorous in their recycling and you’re not, what they end up doing is condemning the entire lot.”During the town halls, administrators also provided information on construction projects across campus, including the demolition of McKenna Hall and Brownson Hall, the construction of a new art museum and updates on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II project.“If you’re worried about there not being enough construction on campus, you don’t have to worry,” Affleck-Graves said jokingly.McKenna Hall will be torn down and rebuilt on half of the current lot to match the building to current standards, Affleck-Graves said.“McKenna has served us well, but it’s not a very efficient space,” he said. “There’s lots of open space in it, and some of the rooms for meetings aren’t up to standards you typically get at conferences nowadays. So, we’ve had very generous benefactors who have given us the funds, so we will replace McKenna Hall.”Brownson Hall will also be torn down and the site will be used to create a new space for the Alliance for Catholic Education, Affleck-Graves said.Additionally, Affleck-Graves said construction on the Eddy Street Commons Phase II will be completed in approximately 18 months to two years. A new art museum, funded by Ernestine Raclin and her daughter and son-in-law Carmen and Chris Murphy, is also set to be constructed. Currently, administrators plan to build the museum at the site of the Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park. “Really, the long term dream of building this arts district on our campus really comes to fulfillment with an art museum, a sculpture park, school of architecture, performing arts, sacred music and the music library,” Affleck-Graves said. “So we’re really getting a beautiful area for the arts on campus.”During a town hall, Affleck-Graves also answered a question about whether Notre Dame’s food inspections would be kept private following its deal with St. Joseph County.“To me, it’s like filing our own taxes. … We were approached about that, we asked that they be kept private, for various reasons, as you know, that blew up in the press, so I think the agreement we have now, is that if we do them, we will make those public,” he said.University President Fr. John Jenkins also spoke at the town halls, addressing concerns about keeping Notre Dame financially accessible.“One challenge we have, and we all know it, a Notre Dame education for our students is extremely expensive,” he said. “It costs a lot of money, and we have to do everything we can to make a Notre Dame education affordable and make it effective. “To do that, we give financial aid as one of our top priorities, and we have to try to keep costs down. Because to the extent we are more efficient, we can accept more students, we can give them more financial aid, we can be more affordable, more accessible to our students.”Jenkins also addressed the sex abuse crisis facing the Catholic Church and encouraged staff members to report any concerns. Staff members can contact the University Integrity Line, Human Resources, Office of Institutional Equity or Audit and Advisory Services with any workplace concerns, Jenkins said.“If there is an issue, if there is a misconduct and if there is misbehavior, it allows us to investigate it professionally and adjudicate it correctly,” he said. “So let us have that opportunity — if you see something, say something.”Tags: Brownson Hall, Construction, Eddy Street Commons, Faculty Town Hall, fall town hall, First Year of Studies, McKenna Hall, recyclinglast_img read more


first_imgARSENAL Press Association PETR CECH: Recalled to the starting XI following David Ospina’s Champions League blunder, the former Chelsea man produced a stunning block at point-blank range to deny Anthony Martial in the first half and remained alert when tested in the latter stages. 8 (out of 10) HECTOR BELLERIN: Spanish full-back pressed forwards well, offering an outlet down the right in support of Arsenal’s marauding frontline. 7 PER MERTESACKER: Little for the big German to worry about as Martial rarely had anyone to support him. Needed to be more composed as United improved in the second half. 7 GABRIEL: Brazilian centre-back produced another solid display and was a threat at set-plays in the United penalty area. 7 NACHO MONREAL: Solid showing from the left-back, who got away down the overlap, but also tracked back behind Alexis Sanchez. 7 SANTI CAZORLA: Diminutive Spaniard was quick in the transition and found plenty of willing forward runners. 7 FRANCIS COQUELIN: Arsenal’s midfield enforcer revelled in the early exchanges and broke down what little forward momentum United were able to offer. 7 AARON RAMSEY: Wales international started on the right, but covered plenty of ground. Should have scored in the first half, but otherwise a solid enough display. 7 MESUT OZIL: German playmaker was both creator and finisher during Arsenal’s devastating opening spell. At the heart of every attack, showing some great vision and close control. 8 ALEXIS SANCHEZ: Superb finishes from the Chile forward, whose deft flick opened the scoring and then a bullet strike made it 3-0 before half-time. 9 THEO WALCOTT: England striker was again given the nod in attack ahead of Olivier Giroud and stretched the United backline at every opportunity. 8 Substitutes OLIVIER GIROUD (on for Walcott, 75): France forward offered a different dimension to the Arsenal attack during the closing stages. 6 ALEX OXLADE-CHAMBERLAIN (for Ozil, 75): Energetic late cameo display from the England midfielder, who provided an outlet down the right and almost added a fourth in stoppage time. 7 KIERAN GIBBS (for Sanchez, 81): Full-back was pushed into duty on the left side of midfield following Sanchez’s injury, and held the shape well. 6 MANCHESTER UNITED DAVID DE GEA: Misread the cross for the first goal, but could do nothing to prevent Arsenal’s second and third goals. 5 MATTEO DARMIAN: Feeble attempt to tackle Sanchez resulted in Arsenal’s third. Regularly roasted by the Chilean and taken off at half-time. 3 CHRIS SMALLING: Eventually got the defence working as a half-coherent unit, but by that point the damage was done. 5 DALEY BLIND: People have questioned whether the Dutchman is capable enough at centre-back. This performance only strengthens the doubters’ argument. 4 ASHLEY YOUNG: Quite simply, he is not a left-back. Booked for a first-half lunge and too often exposed. 4 MICHAEL CARRICK: Unusually sloppy in midfield, especially in the first half. Unable to pull the strings like normal. 5 BASTIAN SCHWEINSTEIGER: Off the pace yet somehow avoided being substituted at half-time. Improved after the break, but that was not hard. 5 JUAN MATA: Grew into the match having been a mere spectator early on, trying to unlock the door to no avail. 6 MEMPHIS DEPAY: An ineffective, uninspired display from the Dutchman – one that saw him replaced at the break. 5 WAYNE ROONEY: Made a number of clumsy touches and, while he worked hard for the team, this was another underwhelming display from United’s captain. 5 ANTHONY MARTIAL: United’s biggest attacking threat and only a fine Cech save prevented him reducing the deficit as half-time approached. 6 Substitutes ANTONIO VALENCIA (for Darmian, 45): Did a far better job at right-back when it came to marshalling star man Sanchez. 5 MAROUANE FELLAINI (for Depay, 45): Physical presence in midfield made a welcome change after a terrible first half from United. 6 JAMES WILSON (for Mata, 82): An attack-minded change but too little, too late by Louis van Gaal. 5 last_img read more


first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ In the first of two exhibitions to start the 2017-18 season, Syracuse beat Southern New Hampshire, a Division II program, 84-54, on Wednesday night inside the Carrier Dome. The Orange went down early, 13-8, but implemented a full-court defense to rip off a 22-0 first-half run and pull away from the Penmen. Nine days before the season opener, sophomore guard Tyus Battle led all players with 20 points. Freshman forward Oshae Brissett added 17.Here are superlatives from the game.The turning point: Tyus Battle’s dunkA two-handed slam by Syracuse’s sophomore guard provided the lift the Orange needed. To dismiss a sloppy first nine and a half minutes, SU flashed full-court pressure. The first SNHU possession after the change resulted in a quick steal and dish to Battle, who slammed it with two hands to give SU a 15-13 lead. Syracuse rode the dunk amid a 22-0 run, part of a 33-8 explosion headed into the break.Stud: Tyus BattleAdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse’s lone returning starter from last season was aggressive from the start. Battle commanded the SU offense early, finding his way into the lane and establishing his shot. He went 0-for-4 from 3 but went 8-for-9 from the charity stripe over 26 minutes of turnover-free basketball. On consecutive possessions in the second half, Battle drove and hit an open Howard Washington for 3.Dud: Matthew MoyerMoyer, a redshirt freshman, started at forward and finished with 10 rebounds. But he was slow to get to perimeter shooters on a couple of closeouts and had only five points across a team-high 28 minutes. He went 2-for-7 from the field and committed four fouls.Highlight: Bourama Sidibe’s blockingIn his first unofficial game of college basketball, Sidibe drew immediate attention. He came off the bench to replace starter Paschal Chukwu, a junior, and racked up five blocks in nine minutes of first-half play. Sidibe blocked the layup attempt of the first driver that came his way. With about seven minutes before the half, Sidibe stuffed a shot that hit a fan in the second row behind the basket.He hit four straight free throws, too, amid SU’s 22-0 run. When Chukwu fell into foul trouble at the start of the second half, Sidibe got more time than the 20 minutes per game head coach Jim Boeheim anticipated. Sidibe finished with six blocks, 10 points and eight boards.Lowlight: Frank Howard’s turnoversHoward, the starting point guard, scored Syracuse’s first points of the game on a 3-pointer from the right wing. He racked up 15 points and three steals, but the junior finished with six turnovers against a Division-II defense. With SU down one about four minutes in, Howard dribbled into traffic around the left elbow and lost control.With Syracuse down 8-5, he didn’t hit rim on an awkward lefty layup attempt. Later, after Syracuse commanded a double-digit lead, Howard tossed a pass out of bounds. Boeheim slapped his forehead in frustration.Out due to injury: Geno ThorpeThorpe, a graduate transfer from South Florida, sat on the bench in a jumpsuit because he hurt his ankle in practice. He did not play, leaving the SU frontcourt to Battle, Howard and Washington.Syracuse plays next on Monday night against Southern Connecticut State in its second and final exhibition. Comments Published on November 1, 2017 at 9:20 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21last_img read more