first_img By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary BLOG: How DOC is Helping Inmates with Mental Illness Transition Home (Round-up) Criminal Justice Reform,  Round-Up,  The Blog Yesterday, Department of Corrections officials highlighted a state-run, first-of-its-kind unit at the Wernersville Community Corrections Center that helps individuals with mental illness transition home following incarceration. At the media event, reporters were given a tour of the 32-bed unit and interviewed employees and center residents.“We are proud of our efforts to address the behavioral health needs of those who are incarcerated in Pennsylvania,” said Corrections Secretary John Wetzel. “With fully one-quarter of all of those entering prisons in Pennsylvania diagnosed with mental illness and nine percent of those struggling with serious mental illness, it is imperative that the department develop the best possible programming to help them succeed when they return to the community. We anticipate that Pathways Transitional Wellness Center will become a model facility for other states.”Take a look at the additional coverage below: May 18, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Philadelphia Inquirer: Helping mentally ill inmates find their way home“When Henry Hamm, a 61-year-old Lancaster man who has schizophrenia, finished serving time for writing a bad check, he was sent to a new program designed to help offenders with serious mental illnesses rejoin the outside world. He joined Pathways Transitional Wellness Center, which connects mentally ill parolees to social and medical services, housing, and jobs before they try to make it on their own. Three months later, he’s a fan of the nine-month-old Department of Corrections program, which is housed in a boxy, utilitarian building on the grounds of Wernersville State Hospital, about nine miles southwest of Reading.”Allentown Morning Call: State touts reentry program for seriously mentally ill inmates“As a state prison inmate with serious mental illness, 61-year-old Henry Hamm represents one of the biggest challenges that Pennsylvania’s corrections system faces. Hamm, who is serving a 2- to 4-year sentence in Lancaster County for felony theft, is diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Too often, the extra hurdles he faces would make his time as a prisoner a difficult one, and one in which he risked returning to the streets no better able to cope with his problems than when he left. Enter a first-of-its-kind program at a halfway house run by the Department of Corrections on the campus of Wernersville State Hospital, roughly 10 miles west of Reading.”Reading Eagle: State corrections secretary celebrates success at Wernersville center“Mentally ill Americans are disproportionately more likely to be arrested, incarcerated and commit another crime once released. This problem extends to the state level. Pennsylvania Department of Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said about 27 percent of all inmates in the system have a mental illness and about 9 percent of those are battling severe disorders. So to address the needs of this unique population the department launched a new program solely dedicated to helping those offenders return to the community after they have served their time.”Follow the Department of Corrections on Twitter @CorrectionsPA and on Facebook. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more


first_img Italian bookmakers face cruel summer as ADM sanctions shop closures July 27, 2020 Share Di Maio’s man Giacomo Lasorella takes leadership of AGCOM August 17, 2020 After decades of decline, Italian horse racing has been thrown a lifeline in the form of the country’s latest Budget Law. Most notably, the turnover-based tax regime that has been so detrimental has been replaced by a new gross gaming revenue (GGR) tax.The GGR tax regime for horse racing is based on that already implemented in the sports betting sector. However, horse racing taxes – set at 43% for retail bets and 47% for online – remain significantly higher than the 18% and 22% that land-based and online sports betting has to deal with.  The situation has been further improved by the loosening of strict laws, with this liberalisation expected to lead to industry growth. Previously, betting on horses was restricted to official betting lists published by Italian gaming authority ADM, but the Budget Law has relaxed this. After sports betting laws were similarly relaxed, the Italian gaming market witnessed sizeable growth, and it is hoped it will have the same effect on horse racing. Additionally, the Budget Law postponed the country’s proposed new betting licenses, so to allow local municipalities time to change their laws accordingly. The existing betting shop and corner licenses have been extended for the full year, against the payment of an annual extension fee of €6000 per betting shop and €3500 per betting corner. A new tender for betting shops and corner licenses also aims to take in €410 million by the end of September. New ADM chief: Italy to keep strictest monitoring on gambling incumbents July 6, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Related Articles Submitlast_img read more


first_imgFrank Lampard has admitted it would be a “disaster” if Chelsea failed to qualify for next season’s Champions League.A goalless draw against Fulham on Monday saw the champions remain in fifth place in the Premier League.With Chelsea trailing leaders Manchester United by 12 points, the 32-year-old midfielder denied that the cup competitions were now the priority.Speaking at the launch of the England Footballers’ Foundation, Lampard told BBC Sport: “We must finish in the top four and can never take our eye off the ball, it would be a disaster if we didn’t qualify.”Chelsea host Everton in round four of the FA Cup on Saturday and play FC Copenhagen in the first knockout round of the Champions League three days later.And Lampard admitted that the two competitions were now vital to his club. He said: “There’s huge importance because you can see the league’s going to be difficult and that means it’s more important to reach finals.”The club’s record signing Fernando Torres has failed to score in the two matches he has played since his £50m move from Liverpool but Lampard also backed his team-mate to star for his new club.“He’s made a huge difference,” he said. “No, he hasn’t scored in two games but all the spotlight is on him.“There’s a huge responsibility, people are looking to him to do it instantly, but he will make a difference to us.“He’s a top-class player, he has boosted the lads already and for sure will come good, he’s going to add to us in a big way. “David Luiz has come in as well and has been fantastic.”With £25m for Luiz, Chelsea splashed out £75m on transfer window deadline day and Lampard said he was delighted by the January spending spree.“I was slightly surprised but it was very exciting and I was pleased,” he said.“It’s a huge boost to have such quality players that we needed at the time.“We haven’t spent much in recent years compared to some by our standards, but last season we won the [League and FA Cup] double and this was a good time for us to go into the market. “I’m just thankful we’ve got the funds to do this.”Lampard admitted Chelsea’s inconsistent form this season has been down to “a few factors”.“We haven’t performed as well, there’s been injuries, and some unsettling moments, but if you don’t perform you fall behind in the title race and that’s the reason really.”Lampard is the nephew of Harry Redknapp, and after seeing his uncle mastermind Spurs’ victory over AC Milan on Tuesday, the Chelsea player admitted he would like to see him manage England after Fabio Capello steps down in 2012.“There’d be a few candidates,” he said. “It’s for him and the FA to decide but it’d be nice if it were an English manager. “At the moment Harry’s doing a fantastic job at Spurs and if he has an opportunity to manage England I’m sure he’d be an outstanding manager. But at the moment we have to play for Capello and we have to win something.”Lampard captained England to victory over Denmark on 9 February but insists there is still a lot of work to do before the national team can claim to have fully recovered from their World Cup debacle in South Africa.“Since the World Cup we’ve had good and not so good results,” he said.“We haven’t turned the corner yet. That is a process and takes time.“When we reach the European Championships and do better than we did at the World Cup then we can say we have.” Source: BBClast_img read more