first_imgTwo hundred and fifty-one students graduated from the Georgetown School of Nursing on Thursday. This number comprises 110 professionally registered nurses, 56 midwives and 85 nursing assistants.Leola Charles, a graduate from the Professional Nursing Programme of the Georgetown School of Nursing, and now a registered nurse, has emerged as the 2018 valedictorian. Charles, along with others, received special awards for their outstanding performances and special skills demonstrated throughout their course of studies.This year’s graduation marks the school’s 31st Biennial ceremony, where scores of young professionals have received certification to provide services in the public health sector. The graduation exercise was hosted at the National Cultural Centre.In her valedictory speech, Charles encouraged her batch along with those who have completed other programmes, to be trailblazers in their respective fields, as they transition fully into the world of work.“Let us leave a trail that others will be proud to follow. Class of 2018, as graduates, we face many uncertainties in both the immediate and distant future; however, it’s up to us to make a difference to have people say honourable things about us and leave the impression that you never gave up on yourself,” Charles is quoted by the Department of Public Information as saying.Charles was the recipient of the Public Health Minister’s Award and the first-ever PAHO/WHO award among several others in recognition of her stellar performanceValedictorian Leola Charles receives her award from Public Health Minister Volda Lawrenceboth in theory and clinical practices.In her address to the gathering, Public Health Minister Volda Lawrence said since her appointment to the sector, she has worked assiduously with the faculty of health sciences and education to make necessary changes to nursing education.To this end, the Minister expressed her confidence in the graduating batch’s preparedness to be deployed into the public health system. She further added that the citizens of Guyana can be reassured of quality health services being delivered to them by these professionals.The graduates were also encouraged to demonstrate an excellent level of patient care as they all have an important role to play as servants in the public health sector.“We at the Ministry recognise that you are the pillars of a sustainable and an effective health system the core of the next generation of nurses on whom Guyana will depend for a resilient and robust health structure,” Minister Lawrence said.Midwife Ann Ferguson-Goppy, registered Nurse Melissa Emanuel and Nursing Assistant, Sherl Daniels, all excitedly highlighted their journey to completing their individual programmes.The graduation ceremony saw several persons from this year’s batch receiving special awards in the areas of interpersonal skills, management and leadership qualities and overall outstanding performances in theoretical studies and clinical practices.Among those graduating was Batch 125A, who was a part of approximately 200 students, who retook the State Final Examinations and attained 100 per cent passes in 2017. This batch received timepieces compliments of PAHO/WHO in recognition of their overwhelming performance.The Georgetown-based nursing school have over the years been hit by many controversies. Last year, 150 students who wrote the nursing exams, which were allegedly compromised, had to rewrite the exams.An investigation was launched after it was reported that the nurse’s examination papers were leaked before the sitting and assessment of 250 nursing students.last_img read more


first_imgABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates – Vice President Dick Cheney told U.S. troops in Iraq on Thursday that he knows they’re suffering hardships from extended deployments but the longer stays are “vital to the mission.” His words were greeted with restrained applause at a rally on a U.S. military base near Saddam Hussein’s former hometown of Tikrit. On his second day in Iraq, Cheney also held classified meetings with U.S. military leaders and emerged repeating the words of the top U.S. commander in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus, that “we can expect more violence” ahead. From Iraq, Cheney flew to this Persian Gulf nation, the second stop on a trip that also will include visits to Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan. The purpose of his trip is to persuade Arab allies in the region to do more to help stabilize Iraq and promote ethnic reconciliation there. Today, Cheney is to visit the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis, steaming in the Persian Gulf not far from here. A couple of thousand soldiers, clad in camouflage uniforms and with rifles slung on their shoulders, greeted the vice president at a mess hall at Camp Speicher, the desert post near Tikrit. Specialist Eric Emo, 23, of Sedalia, Mo., whose Army unit is based in Fort Riley, Kan., said most of his fellow soldiers are unhappy about the deployment extensions, from the current 12 months to 15 months, but understand the need for it. In terms of hostile activity, he said, “conditions around here have gotten a lot worse.” He said there has been a particularly sharp increase in the number of roadside bombs. One of the last warm-up acts before Cheney’s appearance was a top10 list of reasons to love Iraq. The No.1 reason was: “Where else can you get a 15-month vacation and call it the luxury extension plan?” Officials said the three-month extension would affect nearly everyone on the base, where 10,000 to 12,000 U.S. troops are stationed. Cheney took on the issue in his speech moments later. “Many of you have had your deployments extended, and that puts an unexpected hardship on you and your families,” he said. “I want you to know the extension is vital to the mission. The Army and the country appreciate the extra burden that you carry.” Despite rising opposition in Washington to President George W. Bush’s military buildup, Cheney said terrorists have made Iraq the place they want to fight and “we will stay on the offensive. We will not sit back and wait to be hit again.” Maj. Gen. Benjamin R. (Randy) Mixon, commander of coalition forces in northern Iraq, said morale generally remains good “in terms of staying focused on the mission.” “They understand perfectly the reason the mission’s been extended,” Mixon told reporters. He said the blanket three-month extensions helped take the guess work out of the policy. “They want to know the exact day they’re going back. That gives them something to focus on,” he said. Cheney is expected to press Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan to try to use their influence with Arab Sunnis in Iraq to help reduce sectarian tensions. At the same time, he has criticized Iran’s growing influence among Shiites in Iraq and its possible role in providing sophisticated weapons to Iraqi insurgents to use against U.S. troops. The vice president denied that the conflict in Iraq was fast developing into a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran. “That’s not the way I perceive it,” he said in an interview with Fox News.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more