first_imgBURNABY, B.C. – Fort St. John native Sterling Middleton has been named Curl BC’s Junior Male Athlete of the Year for the second straight year.Curl BC announced the winners of their Annual Award winners today, ahead of the awards ceremony that is planned to take place next month.Team Tardi, featuring Middleton, brothers Tyler and Jordan Tardi, Nicholas Meister and coach Paul Tardi, was the first junior men’s curling team from B.C. to win gold at the national level since 2000. The team also represented Canada at the 2017 World Junior Curling Championships in South Korea, where they missed out on a medal because of a tiebreaker that didn’t go their way. The team has won the Curl BC 2017 Team of the Year Award.- Advertisement -Skip Tyler and third Sterling have also been named the joint 2017 Junior Male Athlete of the Year. In addition to their success at the Junior (U21) level the two curlers won a bronze medal alongside Victoria curlers Derek Chandler and Scott Gray at the inaugural Canadian U18 Curling Championships.This is the fourth time that Team Tardi has been named Team of the Year, with Tyler Tardi having had three previous nods for Junior Male Athlete of the Year. Middleton also won the same award last year.A total of 14 awards will be handed out at the event which recognizes the vital contribution that volunteers, coaches, insiders and athletes have made to the sport of curling in BC over the past year.Advertisementlast_img read more


first_imgAs part of the Churchill Fair Glenswilly over 40’s will play Termon over 40’s at 7.30pm on Wednesday 17th at Glenswilly GAA ground.It should be a bit of craic with the legendary Frankie Doherty coming out of retirement to ref the game.But the question is ‘Who will keep up with who?’ There are rumours that the Termon team are even bringing in a certain Anthony Tohill out of retirement!Proceeds of game to Donegal GAA Training Centre in Convoy. CRAIC PROMISES TO BE ‘OVER 40’ AT CHURCHILL FAIR GAA CHALLENGE! was last modified: July 14th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgSome Darwinists think they have figured out the origin of laughter.  When our ape-like ancestors started walking, they found it awkward and often tripped over their feet.  Bystanding apes apparently found this humorous for some reason, and thus slapstick comedy was born.  The Times Online found this story good for some one-liners.How can this be?  Humor and happiness has no intrinsic meaning in Darwinian thinking.  It’s all about selfishness and survival (cartoon).(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Infrastructure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Eastern Cape province: The breakwater made of dolosse at the new Ngqura Harbour, next to the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The new system of roads and other infrastructure at the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The breakwater at the new Ngqura Harbour, next to the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: A project to widen the road and lay bigger water pipes, on the N2 national road near Storms River. Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: The bridge over the Storms River in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Nelson Mandela Drive is the main road through the city. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Nelson Mandela Drive is the main road through the city. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Telkom’s microwave tower on Naval Hill. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Bloemfontein, Free State province: Telkom’s microwave tower on Naval Hill. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image INFRASTRUCTURE 9: {loadposition infrastructure}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more


first_img27 March 2014 South Africa remains firmly committed to maintaining the security of all nuclear and other radioactive material in the country, in keeping with its national and international obligations, International Relations Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane said at the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit at The Hague in the Netherlands on Tuesday. “We welcome the progress achieved to strengthen nuclear security at national levels and through the relevant multilateral organisations, especially the International Atomic Energy Agency,” Nkoana-Mashabane said. “South Africa stands ready to work together with all members of the international community to raise nuclear security levels internationally.” South Africa would continue to exercise its right to research, develop and use nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, she said, noting that the country had adopted a policy on the beneficiation of its mineral resources, including uranium. “We also derive great benefit from nuclear applications in areas such as health, nutrition and agriculture. South Africa contributes to these applications through the supply of medical isotopes and is well-placed to produce these isotopes on a large scale using low-enriched uranium fuel.” According to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, South Africa “firmly favours a multilateral approach to promoting nuclear security which upholds the centrality of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations, and which respects the international rule of law and the principles enshrined in the UN Charter. “South Africa believes that through a co-operative approach in the relevant multilateral organisations, [nuclear security risks] can be effectively dealt with.” Nkoana-Mashabane attended the two-day summit along with a South African delegation that included Energy Minister Ben Martins. Fifty-three countries were represented at the Hague summit, the third Nuclear Security Summit to be held since the inaugural summit hosted by US President Barack Obama in Washington in 2010. The summit concluded with the adoption of the Hague Communique which, according to the summit website, includes new agreements on “reducing the amount of dangerous nuclear material in the world that terrorists could use to make a nuclear weapon”, as well as “improving the security of radioactive material (including low-enriched uranium) that can be used to make a ‘dirty bomb’”. SAinfo reporter and SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I hunted with a cat the other evening. I was after deer while the feline was stalking smaller mammals as I watched it undetected from my treestand above its perch. We shared a small swamp flanked by harvested bean and corn fields and accessed by narrow, overgrown fencerows connecting to wood lots. The farmer had left some standing corn and beans in the corners and around a wind-fallen ash tree, and the bonus grain and cover was a magnet to the local game, both feathered and furred.I know fellows who say they shoot feral cats when they see them in the field, taking care to target felines that are far from any farmhouse where they might double as pets. The argument is that the cats have gone native and, with no natural predators, ravage local game- and song-bird populations. You may have read about some recent studies done on the subject. I did, and have invited one feral cat expert on to my show next month to learn more about the issue. I’ll welcome Matt Clayton to Buckeye Sportsman on the Dec. 9 broadcast.I watched that cat as it crept up to the end of a branch off a fallen tree, settling in from that higher vantage point much the way I had in my stand 17 feet above. While I had the benefit of head to toe woodland camouflage to blend in with our shared surroundings, the feline had an unfortunate coloration: pure white but for a tail ringed like a raccoon and a pair of grown eye patches. You could see the stark-white predator working its way through the brush and stalks from clear across the field. The poor cat’s unnatural camo couldn’t be worse, I thought, then shuddered with a blast of the north wind that found its way down the back of my neck. That’s when it occurred to me that when the snow flies and living off the land is at its leanest, that cat’s coat will fit right in when it needs it the most. I wished the feline luck as it eventually padded off into a thick clump of timothy, and I sat shivering ‘til dark waiting for game that never showed. Waterfowl IDSpeaking of hunting, with waterfowl seasons in full swing across the state as Ohio’s duck and goose seasons begin, hunters are encouraged to familiarize themselves with waterfowl identification before heading out. Ohio waterfowl hunters frequently encounter a variety of species of birds when in the field and marsh, and some species of ducks, geese and swans may look similar.Some species, like the state-threatened trumpeter swans and occasionally migrating tundra swans, are protected and may be encountered. Although waterfowl hunters in Ohio rarely encounter snow geese, hunters should still be able to distinguish between swans and snow geese. With proper species identification and attention, there should be little confusion between the species. Trumpeter swan (threatened and protected species)• Mature birds have pure-white plumage (sometime stained heads) and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4 to 5 feet with a wingspan of 7 feet and weight of 17 to 28 pounds. Tundra swan (protected species)• Mature birds have pure- white plumage and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4.5 feet with a wingspan of 5.5 feet and weight of 8 to 23 pounds. Canada goose (legal game species)• Black-necked plumage with chin strap, black head, tan breast, brown back, long necks• Length of 2.5 to 3.5 feet with a wingspan of 4 to 5.5 feet, and weight of 6.5 to 20 pounds. Snow goose (legal game species)• White with black wing tips, short necks relative to the body size• Length of 2.5 feet with a wingspan of 4.5 feet and weight 3.5 to 7 pounds.For more information about waterfowl hunting in Ohio visit wildohio.gov.last_img read more


first_imgSports persons and officials hold Queen’s Baton at Qutub Minar in New delhi on Friday.The Commonwealth Games seems to be finally catching up with Delhi’ites as the Queen’s Baton reached the host city.The baton, which has been around the world in the 71 Commonwealth countries in a journey that took almost a year, was hosted by the three armed forces on Friday morning at the India Gate, in a ceremony that showcased all the pomp and pageantry associated with the Services.There were schoolchildren to add vibrancy and enthusiasm to the occasion and even the early morning timing could not deter them from showing their excitement.The armed forces band provided its own unique setting for the event.The baton had to rise early as it was taken to Vijay Chowk at 7 am from where it made its way to the Amar Jawan Jyoti.It then travelled to other landmarks of the city – the Lotus Temple, Teen Murti Bhawan, Qutab Minar and the Delhi Secretariat.On Saturday, it will be at Gurdwara Rakab Ganj Sahib and St. Columba’s Cathedral – before paying a visit to the Games Village.Other places the baton, which carries a message from the British monarch, will go to are Rajghat, Jama Masjid, Akshardham Temple and the Red Fort.The journey will end at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium on Sunday, where the 19th Commonwealth Games will be declared open on Sunday. Queen Elizabeth’s message will be read aloud at the opening ceremony of the Games.advertisementThe nearly 20,000km the baton has travelled is the longest relay in its history. It also has the facility to capture images and sounds as it travels around the nations of the Commonwealth. With Global Positioning System technology, it can be tracked down to its exact location.The relay is said to symbolise the unity and shared ideals of the Commonwealth.The relay was launched on October 29 last year at Buckingham Palace in London, with Queen Elizabeth II handing the baton to President Pratibha Devisingh Patil.The first Baton bearer was rifle shooter Abhinav Bindra, India’s first individual Olympic gold medallist, making the country proud at Beijing in 2008.Bindra began the baton’s journey with a relay around the Queen Victoria Monument. The first team of baton bearers included Sebastian Coe, Kapil Dev, Sania Mirza, Milka Singh, Kelly Holmes, Vijender Kumar and Susan Gilroy, to name a few.Organising Committee chairman Suresh Kalmadi had the thrill of holding the baton and walking down the Rajpath.”I’m feeling very proud about the baton. It’s come all the way from London, covering a distance of 190,000 kilometres without a blemish,” said Kalmadi.last_img read more