first_imgIn a continuing effort to provide the best wireless service for local residents, Verizon Wireless, the nation’s largest wireless provider, has expanded its digital network in Vermont, with a new cell site. The new site, located on an existing silo, provides improved coverage and capacity in Ferrisburg along Route 7.The new site is part of the company’s aggressive multi-billion dollar network investment each year to stay ahead of the growing demand for Verizon Wireless voice and data services, like two-way text messaging and Internet access, in New England.This investment is part of the company’s commitment to offer customers the most reliable service available on the nation’s largest wireless network. The company’s most reliable network claim is based on network studies performed by real-life test men and test women who inspired the company’s national advertising campaign. They conduct more than 300,000 call attempts monthly on Verizon Wireless’ and other national wireless carriers’ networks while traveling over 100,000 miles nationwide in specially-equipped company-owned quality test vehicles.”This network expansion will allow us to meet the growing need of local businesses and consumers for their voice calls and data applications, like our high-speed Express Network (sm) and two-way text messaging service,” said Bob Stott, Verizon Wireless regional president.Express Network is the company’s nationwide high-speed wireless data network, providing fast wireless Internet service, with bursts up to 144 kilobits per second (kbps). Express Network gives users full Internet access, intranet access and traditional email functionality via a laptop at unprecedented speeds for wireless access. Users can expect average speeds between 40 and 60 kbps, significantly higher than speeds being produced by competing technologies and comparable to, if not faster, than what PC users get when using a dial-up Internet service. Verizon Wireless has invested more than $8 billion over the last two years in its nationwide network, offering customers access to the most extensive wireless voice and data network in the United States.last_img read more


first_imgAcross the country—and especially in the South—opiate addiction is a catastrophe.People have asked me if I have ever met anyone who has come off opiates successfully without substituting another opiate or drug. In over twenty years of medicine, I’ve known only one: Travis Muehleisen is a former opiate addict now running addict.Muehleisen did not choose to take pain meds. He was given them by physicians after four back surgeries to treat spinal stenosis. Muehleisen was obese, weighing 330 pounds at the time. He also suffered from depression, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and coronary artery disease.“I didn’t like this way of life, but knew no other way,” says Muehleisen. “I knew I had to change or I was not going to be alive much longer.”He decided to make a change. In the winter of 2010, he started walking a mile on the treadmill in his sister’s basement. Within a month, he was up to three miles.The next summer, he ran his first lap around the track at Martinsburg High School. Slowly he kept increasing his distance, and a year later, he ran his first half marathon.As an opiate user, Travis knew only one way to enter running: all in—and often to excess.  “If I do not run and run hard, I literally feel pain,” says Muehleisen. “It takes me around six miles to get the substitute.”Since he has started running, Muehleisen has lost over one hundred pounds from exercise and eating right. “I no longer take any medications. I am really proud of that, And I am in the best shape of my life and back to working full time.”img_0788Travis is one of the few people I know who has come off disability. There is little incentive to work when you are getting a paycheck and insurance not to work. But Travis wants to work to keep his brain and body highly engaged. Desk job? Not for Travis. He is a steel worker and builds bridges.Muehleisen is now six years opiate-free. He has run 14 marathons in 4 years and plans to run the JFK 50 Miler this fall. He recently shared these insights from the past six years:What have you learned about running’s role in treatment of opiate addiction?Running has shown me that there is a productive life after addiction. If you want a good life bad enough, it’s up to you to take control of it.Do you think the symptoms of addiction ever go away?Just speaking for myself, I don’t think the addiction ever goes away. I think addicts just learn to cope with it.How do you feel if you miss running?If I miss running, I find myself experiencing pain and depression.Any other activity substitute in the same way?I haven’t found anything to substitute this addiction with besides running and the challenge of it.What advice would you give someone of pain medication now who wishes to get off them?Stay strong. It’s a long journey but it’s very rewarding once you have it under control. Find something that challenges you physically and mentally and just dive in.What do you think are the biggest barriers to people coming off the meds?Believing in yourself, getting your self esteem back, trusting that there is a life after addiction, and mending the damage you have caused to family and friends.Muehleisen’s Mental MarathonWhen Travis Muehleisen ran his first full marathon, what got him through it was this:Mile 1: I ran for God for giving me the strength and another chance at life.Mile 2: For my two children, Jordan and Jessica, whom I love so very much.Mile 3: For my parents, my father in heaven who always believed in me and my abilities to do anything I wanted to do. For my mother, for always being there for me through the good and the bad.Mile 4: For my soul mate and best friend, T, for instilling confidence in me and for supporting me.Mile 5: For all of those disabled who can’t run.Mile 6: For those children being bullied.Mile 7: For my family, for believing in me.Mile 8: For people fighting cancer.Mile 9: For the US troops for fighting for my freedom.Mile 10: For all the victims affected by an act of mother nature.Mile 11: For those who are homeless.Mile 12: For all my medical doctors, especially for my neurosurgeon.Mile 13: For all abused animals. Mile 14: For those struggling with addiction.Mile 15: For all who are battling depression.Mile 16: For all my true friends.Mile 17: For all my coworkers.Mile 18: For all my teachers and coaches.Mile 19: For those suffering from hunger.Mile 20: For children battling obesity.Mile 21: For those who are missing loved ones.Mile 22: For abused women and children.Mile 23: For babies “born too soon.”Mile 24: For Chandler (my boxer) and Mallory (my Maltese) for accompanying me on several runs.Mile 25: For my health and happiness.Mile 26: I ran for me, for having the guts and courage. And the last .2 I ran for chili and cheese nachos!last_img read more


first_imgAsset managers should be held to account by pension funds over their stewardship issues at annual stewardship meetings, according to the chief responsible investment officer of Aviva Investors.Steve Waygood said there was a need to “shine a light” on the stewardship efforts of the investment management industry, and that the industry needed to be significantly more public in its disclosures on the issue.Speaking at a National Association of Pension Funds (NAPF) event on stewardship, Waygood said that, unlike a code for companies on corporate governance – which saw the matters discussed at AGMs and followed up by the capital markets – the Stewardship Code had no mechanism for holding asset managers to account.He pointed out that both Aviva Investors and Aviva published stewardship reports, but he questioned who was monitoring the data published. “How do our clients get to hold us to account for the content?” he asked. “Where is the equivalent to the AGM?”Waygood went on to recommend that an organisation, such as the NAPF, convene a stewardship AGM as a market-based mechanism for accountability, with one trustee from each of the group’s member pension funds present.He said trustees would be required to “come and vote on a series of presentations from the very biggest fund managers”.“The clients that were in the room would sequentially be able to vote on each of the chief executives of the asset managers’ presentations on the quality and breadth and depth of stewardship,” he said.“We need to shine a light on the stewardship of the investment management industry by being much more public to the end owners.”He said the debate surrounding stewardship had all too often has been “an ivory tower between the investment managers, corporate governance experts and fund managers”.Chris Hitchen, chief executive of RPMI, supported the call for pension investors to ensure asset managers were “doing the best job they can on our behalf”.However, Hitchen also said diversification of pension assets had been “overdone” in the last decade, meaning that fewer, larger stakes could be more easily monitored by pension funds.“Our goals aren’t really to match or beat indices,” he said, “they should for a long-term real return.“In that guise, holding fewer, larger investments and then having more deep relationships with the boards of our investee companies makes perfect sense.“We need to be committed owners.”last_img read more


first_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Third inning:Pitcher Brandon Woodruff hit a home run off Clayton Kershaw to tie the game at 1. 4th inning:Pitcher Clayton Kershaw was taken out of the game for the Dodgers after three innings pitched. He allowed six hits and four runs while striking out two. Related Articles Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Check back for more. Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Second inning:The Los Angeles Dodgers lead the Milwaukee Brewers in Game 1 of the NLCS after a solo home run by Manny Machado. Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more