first_imgHolding the small group sessions must not conflict with local public health or government restrictions, but is the next step in the league’s hopes of returning to action. A maximum of six players may be assigned to a single group. Teams must submit club-specific plans for the small group sessions to the league. The league said teams may split full fields into two equal halves and teams may define up to six zones per half field, spaced at least 10 feet apart. Only one player may be in each zone at any time to maintain physical distancing. Players may switch zones but two players cannot occupy the same zone.Players may pass and shoot on goal, but all training exercises must allow for 10 feet of distance.The league says all health and safety measures required when teams began individual training must be maintained. Players will be screened, including temperature checks, before being allowed on training fields. All equipment must be cleaned after use.The league-wide moratorium on full team training remains in effect through June 1. May 28, 2020 The season has been suspended since March 8. It will resume with the British Masters in northern England from July 22-25 before five further events in the “UK Swing” across England and Wales.Four Rolex Series events have been rescheduled for October to December. They are the Scottish Open, the BMW PGA Championship, the Nedbank Golf Challenge and then the season-ending World Tour Championship from Dec. 10-13.The tour says details of other tournaments from September to November will be announced later.European Tour chief executive Keith Pelley says the Ryder Cup is still on schedule for Sept. 25-27 at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin pending more discussions with the PGA Tour.___ The state has set up several guidelines for leagues to follow, including a recommendation that spectators and employees keep at least 6 feet apart from anyone not from their household. If that is not feasible, other measures such as face coverings and sanitation protocols should be followed.Athletes will not be required to wear masks but the guidelines encourage them to be worn on the sidelines. The order does not address college sports events.___Major League Soccer teams can begin voluntary outdoor small group training sessions. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Iowa athletic director Gary Barta is not ruling out having a full stadium for home football games. Barta told reporters the school is planning for several different scenarios, and one of them is opening 69,250-seat Kinnick Stadium to “as many fans as want to join us.”Barta said the number of fans allowed into the stadium will be determined by directives of state and local health officials.On Tuesday, Iowa State athletic director Jamie Pollard wrote in a letter to fans that he anticipated Jack Trice Stadium would host games at 50% capacity, or about 30,000 fans.Even if there are no attendance limits at Iowa, Barta said there could be modifications, such as limiting the number of stadium entrances and open concession stands. He said fans might be required to wear masks.___ Individual high schools will be distributing caps and gowns to the students to wear during the festivities.___The Premier League’s official broadcasters say the competition will restart on June 17.The BBC and Sky Sports say there will be a doubleheader on that day with Manchester City playing Arsenal and Aston Villa hosting Sheffield United.Playing those make-up games on a Wednesday will ensure the 30th round can be contested the following weekend. ___MotoGP organizers and the Spanish government say they are working to bring the racing series back in the summer.MotoGP promoter Dorna says it is “working hard to try” to resume racing in July, likely with consecutive events at the Spanish circuit of Jerez de la Frontera.Spain was set to host four races before the season was put in jeopardy because of the coronavirus pandemic.___ Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam says racing will be allowed to resume in the state without spectators.The governor says NASCAR will race at Martinsville Speedway on June 10, and that other forms of auto racing and horse racing also are cleared to resume.“These events will not be open to the public and no spectators will be allowed, among other restrictions,” he says.NASCAR was originally scheduled to make its first of two stops at Martinsville in early May, but the event was postponed because of the coronavirus. It also will visit Richmond Raceway on Sept. 12 and conclude the season with a return to Martinsville on Nov. 1.___ Live horse racing is slated to resume in Maryland this weekend with a three-day session at Laurel Park, which will remain closed to the general public.The Maryland Jockey Club says it has received approval from the Maryland Racing Commission to launch its Summer 2020 meet with live racing on Saturday, but fans are forbidden from entering the track until clearance is received from the state.All races on Saturday, Sunday and Monday will be streamed live on the Laurel Park website.___Italy’s top soccer league will resume on June 20. Miami Dolphins tight end Mike Gesicki says the recent pass-and-catch video he posted that went viral was inspired by boredom during the coronavirus lockdown.The video shows Gesicki lobbing a football over a multi-story beach house, running through the garage and making the catch on the other side on the run as he heads into the street.“I was honestly just super bored, and I was at my girlfriend’s beach house, pretty close to where I live, and we were just kind of hanging out,” Gesicki says . “We saw something similar to that on the internet and we were like, ‘Hey, I might try that,’ and ended up taking a couple tries. It was fun.”Gesicki had a breakout 2019 in his second NFL season. He capped it by making the winning touchdown catch in the finale at New England.___ ___Darlington Raceway is switching gears for its next event.Two weeks after hosting NASCAR’s return to racing, the track will hold graduation ceremonies for the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science & Mathematics. There will be 120 graduating seniors at Saturday’s event from the school in Hartsville, a few miles from NASCAR’s oldest superspeedway.Darlington Raceway President Kerry Tharp said the track was honored to help the high school seniors be recognized in a proper way.Traditional high school graduation ceremonies have been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. The ceremony will take place at a parking lot on track property. Afterward, the graduates and their parents will have the chance to drive their vehicles for a lap around the 1.366-mile track and get their pictures taken on the start-finish line.center_img Western Kentucky has proposed a staggered restart plan that would allow the return of 65 football players for voluntary workouts on June 8.The university has released its proposed restart plan for public feedback, with fall classes beginning on Aug. 24 and in-person instruction concluding on Nov. 20. A final approved plan from four committees, including athletics, will be released next week.Volleyball, soccer and the remaining 40 football players will return July 6 and be followed days later by the men’s and women’s basketball teams. Other programs will return later in August.___While some athletes have struggled to cope with the isolation of the coronavirus lockdown, Atlanta Falcons center Alex Mack has no complaints. He has picked up a new hobby — making bread — and learned that he doesn’t mind spending most of his time at home.“I can be a homebody pretty well,” Mack said during a video conference call with Atlanta media. “The things I like to do, apparently you don’t need to leave the house that much.”The six-time Pro Bowler has been documenting his new hobby on social media. So far, he has churned out French bread, a standard loaf, pizza, brioche bread and English muffins for a homemade breakfast sandwich.The 34-year-old Mack is heading into his 12th season in the NFL. At this point, he’s taking in year by year.“The goal when I showed up in the league was 10 years,” he said. “That seemed like a good career. From here on out, I want to do the best I can to play at the highest level. I’m going to play one year at a time. I think I’ve got a lot of juice left in the tank. I’m ready to go this year.” Sports Minister Vincenzo Spadafora gave Serie A the green light to resume after a meeting with Italian soccer authorities on Thursday.A medical protocol for matches was approved by a technical scientific committee earlier.Spadafora says Serie A will restart on June 20 but the Italian Cup semifinals and the final could be played on June 13 and 17.Serie A has been suspended since March 9, when the government ordered a nationwide lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic.There are 12 rounds remaining in Serie A, plus four matches that were postponed from the 25th round. More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 The last match was played on March 9 before the competition was suspended because of the coronavirus pandemic.Squads were only allowed to restart practice sessions in small groups last week but contact and tackling is now allowed between players.___The European Tour plans to resume its season in July starting with a six-week stretch of golf tournaments in Britain and running through to the World Tour Championship in Dubai in December.The tour says its events initially will be held without spectators and will be subject to strict testing protocols amid the coronavirus pandemic. ___Malcolm Jenkins, who this offseason left the Eagles to sign with the New Orleans Saints as a free agent, will be the keynote speaker at Philadelphia’s virtual graduation on June 9.Jenkins starred for the Eagles for the last six seasons and the safety won an NFL championship in 2017. He also has been a leader of several off-field initiatives, and his foundation has a mission to promote positive change in the lives of underserved youth in New Jersey, where he grew up; Ohio, where he went to college at Ohio State; Pennsylvania and Louisiana, homes of his pro teams.“Malcolm was selected not for his greatness on the field and his two Super Bowl rings, but because of his compassion and advocacy around social justice,” said Donna Frisby-Greenwood, CEO of the Fund for the School District of Philadelphia and co-chair of the commencement planning committee. “Malcolm’s foundation focuses on youth leadership development and skill building, and we think that that makes him a perfect speaker for us.”The hour-long graduation will be streamed on several platforms, including the school district’s website. Frisby-Greenwood said that several companies and organizations are involved with planning and serving as sponsors. The Philadelphia Orchestra has recorded “Pomp and Circumstance” for the ceremony. And the city’s Free Library will host the live stream of the event on its platform. ___Texas will soon allow outdoor pro sports events to have spectators, but their numbers will be strictly limited.Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has revised a decision to let pro sports leagues host events without fans starting in June as part of the states’ move to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.Abbott’s new order allows outdoor stadiums to host fans up to 25% of their normal capacity. Leagues will have to apply to state health officials to be allowed to have fans. Indoor events will still be without spectators.The PGA Tour plans to restart its season at Colonial in Texas on June 11-14 but has said it would not include fans. Associated Press The Latest: Iowa AD looking at different football scenarios Georgia Tech will begin the first phase of a plan to reopen its athletic facilities on June 15.The plan is based on guidance from the school administration, the University System of Georgia, Gov. Brian Kemp’s office and public health officials.Under the initial reopening phase, athletes who live in the Atlanta area will be able to use campus weight rooms and athletic training facilities on a voluntary basis.In order to take part, students and staff must make an appointment to work out, complete a daily health check questionnaire, undergo temperature checks when they arrive at the facility, and limit groups to no more than 10 athletes and two staff members inside a facility at one time in order to maintain social distancing guidelines. Also, no locker rooms can be used and all workouts groups must remain the same throughout the first phase of the reopening.___last_img read more


first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ From the living room of their Daytona Beach apartment, Taleah Washington locked eyes with her father. He had seen this coming, and Washington sensed it too. “Writing on the wall,” James Washington said. Seven other girls filtered in and faced James, the head coach of their DME Sports Academy prep school team. It wasn’t exactly the Washington’s living room and it wasn’t exactly home, since the rest of their family was still in District Heights, Maryland. Just a temporary spot. Washington was already a Syracuse (10-11, 4-6 Atlantic Coast Conference) commit, the only DME player with a college destination selected at the start of the year. Minutes weren’t likely with the 2018-19 Orange, so James took the prep job, and the pair moved to Florida following Washington’s high school graduation. But in that three-bedroom, two-closet and one-bathroom apartment accommodating nine people, it became clear their plan was jeopardized. Soon, Washington and her teammates wouldn’t be associated with DME anymore. It was only January, the middle of their season, but an untenable economic situation led to them shutting down the program, James said. The rooms were filled with air mattresses. “Here we go again,” he thought, “another obstacle.”Because that’s exactly what it was: Yet another obstacle. Washington’s freshman year at Syracuse has introduced her to the first stable program since she finished eighth grade. Forestville Military Academy, where she spent her freshman and sophomore years in high school, closed. Rock Creek Christian Academy, where she transferred for her final two years, had five girls on its roster to start. Then, DME folded.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Here, I know I don’t have to worry about that,” Washington said.Syracuse isn’t going anywhere. The minutes head coach Quentin Hillsman gave Washington at the beginning of the season might have disappeared, but they’ll re-emerge at some point. It might be next year, when Gabrielle Cooper is gone. But until then, Syracuse will provide more for her than she will for them.“She’s used to being a giant-killer, you know the David and Goliath story,” James said. “She’s used to being the underdog and coming out on top.”Taleah Washington hit a buzzer-beater before halftime in her first game at Syracuse. Elizabeth Billman | Asst. Photo EditorThere have been “magical” scenes for her this season, like in SU’s season-opener against Ohio when she faded away from the basket and hit a falling buzzer-beater before halftime. But with those have come the eye-opening ones for the freshman, like when she counted five open 3-pointers from her bench spot that the Orange surrendered to Miami’s Mykea Gray in their Jan. 12 loss — a player SU specifically addressed during pregame film.They’re so glaring because Washington looks for those same openings: The few extra inches on a wing. The closeouts a second too late. James had taught her that. He’d always been her coach, from Washington’s youth basketball days, when she’d give James the silent treatment on car rides home, to her high school years when she understood why he pushed her so much. Before coming to SU, James was the only coach Washington ever played for. She was introduced to the sport in second grade, when she’d watch James coach the Ballou (Maryland) High School boys’ team. That’s where Washington learned her first dribble move.As she got older, she featured more and more advanced moves. At Forestville, Washington was part of the first girls state championship in school history. But as her sophomore year wound down and the Knights neared a second-straight title, the school announced it was closing because of declining enrollment.Washington was devastated. This was not only her school but her mother and father’s too. During part one of the Board of Education Boundary Hearing — one of the final in the decision-making process — Washington hopped down the steps toward the podium clad in a gray Nike sweatshirt. As president of the sophomore class and captain of the basketball team, she spoke about how the closing would rip the Forestville community apart.“Forestville is very family-oriented,” Washington said during the hearing. “You always know that when you’re down on the ropes you have people to pick you up.”But she’d have to find that same quality at Rock Creek, where James took the head coaching job and Washington followed. So did some of Washington’s Forestville and Havoc City AAU teammates. The gym was outdated and had no air ventilation. On cold days in the winter, they couldn’t practice at all or had to use another gym. Players would put on layers under their practice jerseys, one of Washington’s teammates said. Washington and her team sometimes returned to Forestville for practice, using its track to shuffle and backpedal, using the gym for mountain-climbers, wind sprints and crab walks. They’d complete the “seven trees” drill that involved running up a steep hill and weaving through each tree along the way. When Rock Creek scrimmaged, they didn’t practice sets. James and other assistant coaches would play, but their offense relied on freedom. She’s used to being a giant-killer, you know the David and Goliath story. She’s used to being the underdog and coming out on top.-James Washington, father of Taleah WashingtonWith Washington averaging nearly a triple-double as a senior, Rock Creek ranked as one of the top high school teams in the country. It played on the Nike Tournament of Champions circuit, traveling to Arizona in the winter and playing in the top bracket despite not practicing for weeks. Then came the New York Rose Classic, a trip to Maryland and other national tournaments, all with Washington at the forefront.“I call it the invisible bag,” James said. “We put our money, our coins and rubbed our coins together to help accumulate all this money and scholarship.”By her senior year, Washington had decommitted from Old Dominion and signed with Syracuse. She knew Hillsman from attending his Elite Camp growing up — and James knew him from Forestville, too — but then the post-grad year came on her radar. After James revealed the fate of DME in the Daytona Beach living room, he created his own prep team — called Empowerment — that completed DME’s schedule and sprinkled in other games against Florida junior colleges. They finished runner-up in the independent national championship in Charlotte, and one-by-one the girls moved out of the school-provided housing and into James’ apartment. Washington became the team cook, assistant coach and go-to player on the court. She listed what each player wanted to eat and assembled meals like chicken alfredo and lasagna. When they traveled, the group rented vans because James’ two-door Mercedes Benz couldn’t fit everyone — even when they crammed four girls into the back row. Parents pitched in money to help along the way, but the bulk of it came from the Washingtons’ account.“It made her hungry,” Hillsman said. “That was a rocky path for her.”At SU, instead of living with seven teammates and her father, Washington has a South Campus apartment. She only has to cook for herself when she wants to, and post-practice meals at the Carmelo K. Anthony Center are always available. Washington’s the happiest she’s ever been, James said. She finally has some stability. Comments Published on February 4, 2020 at 11:15 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrewlast_img read more


first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “We need a consultant to tell us whether we are charging adequate fees,” said Eva Yuan-McDaniel, deputy director of planning for the Los Angeles Planning Department. “Some cases are close to full-cost recovery, and other cases are just unbelievably low,” she said. “If we can have full-cost recovery, that would be much less burden on the general fund – and that’s less subsidy with taxpayer money.” The planning-fee review comes as the city is facing falling revenues and a tightening budget. To lessen the drain on the city’s general fund – which pays for basic city services such as police officers, firefighters and street paving – Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s budget team has initiated studies to see whether Los Angeles needs to charge higher fees. Los Angeles taxpayers are subsidizing more than half the cost of processing new development approvals in the city, according to a Daily News review. In many cases, the planning fees developers pay cover just 40 percent of the expense of staff review and public outreach. In controversial or complicated projects, the fees might cover only 20 percent of the cost. Taxpayers pick up the rest of the tab, which can top $10,000 in some cases. Now, as Los Angeles leaders face a budget crunch and prepare to cut city services, the city has approved a $150,000 study analyzing the possibility of raising planning processing fees. About 13 departments are analyzing the need for fee increases or have recently completed analyses that have justified fee increases. This year, the city raised ambulance fees and fees levied when city crews clear brush on private property. Next year, the city will consider raising fees for animal services, transportation and the Police Department. “When we have a tough budget year, we look at whether we are really recovering the cost of providing a service,” Chief Administrative Officer Karen Sisson said. “It does cost us to provide certain services, and when our expenses go up, we need to make sure we can cover those costs.” Some community activists were surprised, however, that Los Angeles has not attempted to recoup the cost of processing new development applications – especially amid a building boom over the past several years. “All the fees have been going up for residents,” said Gerald Silver, president of Homeowners of Encino, who also cited recent increases in water rates and sewer fees. “It’s unfair to force the full burden of fees on the residents and then give away the store to developers.” But it’s not just the Planning Department. The Department of Building and Safety has not raised its fees in 14 years, even though the department’s workload has soared 80 percent in recent years. “We changed the way we do business. We’re doing more with less,” spokesman Bob Steinbach said. The Department of Building and Safety is now comparing its fees with other cities’ charges. Yuan-McDaniel, with the Planning Department, said the city’s planning-fee structure is so old and complicated – there are 160 different fees – that nobody has attempted to overhaul it. Politics has played a role, too. The business and development community does not always welcome fee increases. “It’s always been this notion of being business-friendly,” said Councilman Ed Reyes, who heads the council’s Planning and Land Use Committee and has pushed for higher fees. “We were not as aggressive in raising that concern.” With the city’s financial crunch – and new Planning Department leadership that has pledged to reform the project-approval process – Reyes said he is hopeful that L.A. taxpayers won’t keep subsidizing development for long. Holly Schroeder, with the Building Industry Association’s L.A. chapter, said the development community could accept higher fees – if the city eases the bureaucracy, which would save developers money. “Sometimes it takes longer to get a housing project approved than it takes to get a drug approved through the Food and Drug Administration,” she said. “If they had a real, rational, effective process that would work, we’re willing to talk about fees paying a greater portion or all of that process,” Schroeder said. In the last few years, L.A. has begun charging full cost for projects that go through the expedited unit. Developers get more speedy service and pay for the staff hours it takes to process their applications. Based on bills sent to developers by the expedited unit, planning officials figure the current planning fees cover about 40 percent of the cost of processing an average project and only 20 percent of the cost of a more complicated or controversial project. Neighboring cities already charge higher fees than Los Angeles. The city of Santa Clarita charges among the highest planning and development fees in the region – yet it was recently ranked one of the most business-friendly cities by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. “We don’t expect our existing residents to pay for development,” said Robert Newman, director of public works for Santa Clarita. He said city fees are based on the staff time needed to process applications, and they’re updated about every five years. “We’ve had very few complaints on the fees we charge,” Newman added. Glendale charges slightly higher planning fees than Los Angeles, and it attempts to recover the full cost of processing development applications. “Even though we’re trying to set the fees at full-cost recovery, we’re nowhere near full-cost recovery,” said Jeff Hamilton, a senior planner with the city of Glendale. Still, Burbank charges fees significantly lower than both Los Angeles and Glendale. “Each year we’ve been trying to increase our fees little by little,” said Joy Forbes, deputy city planner with the city of Burbank. “But we always look at the cities nearby, and the council likes the fact that we’re always right under Glendale and Pasadena. “While we continue to increase fees, we’ll probably never be over those cities.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more