first_imgCongratulations to the following players for being selected as their team MVP at the 2004 Australia Cup in Melbourne. Congratulations also to those selected as the Player of the Final. TEAM MVP’S: Womens: ACT 23’s: Laura Elliot ACT: Kath Finn Victoria 23’s: Claire Atkinson Victoria: Brooke James Victoria 30’s: Sue McKenna NSW Country 23’s: Nicole Beck NSW Country: Jai Curry NSW Country Seniors: Debbie Potts EPTA Seniors: Brenda Williams SA: Tara Stanford Tasmania: Carolyn Reid Mens: ACT: Mark Moses Tasmania: Craig Holloway SA: Jeremy Smith Victoria 23’s: Lucas Robinson Victoria: Craig Hudleston Victoria 30’s: Angelo Cabansag EPTA Seniors: Clint Arnall NSW Country Seniors: Andre Andrews PLAYER OF THE FINAL: Mens: Damien Prendergast (ACT) ACT def Vic 6-4 Womens: Erin Hardes (NSW Open) NSW Open def NSW 23’s 8-2 A big thank you to all staff, referees, selectors, coaches, managers and players for their time at the Australia Cup. It has been a great tournament and the ATA would like to thank everyone involved for their dedication and time. Jon Pratt Australian Touch Associationlast_img read more


first_imgUncle: Half of Europe want Real Madrid midfielder Llorenteby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe agent and uncle of Marcos Llorente has cast doubt over his future at Real Madrid.The midfielder was named man of the match for the Club World Cup final victory over Al Ain on Saturday.Julio Llorente, his uncle and agent, admits going into the tournament they were preparing to leave Real next month.”We will remember this throughout his life because it is the first title in which Marcos has won,” said Julio Llorente.”To continue in Madrid is nice, but we knew it was not good for his development. We had the plan to leave on-loan until the match against Rayo.”Since the season ended with Alavés, I’ve been called by half of Europe, including Champions League teams.”I was surprised he did not have more participation.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say DONE DEAL? Watford swoop for Vozdovac striker Filip Stuparevicby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford have signed Serbian striker Filip Stuparevic.The 18 year-old centre-forward hails from Vozdovac and has already signed for the Hornets.Vozdovac chief Goran Grkinic has confirmed the sale, though Stuparevic is unlikely to be seen at Vicarage Road until next season.The plan is for Watford to send Stuparevic on-loan to Serie A partners Udinese for the coming six months.Despite his youth, the young Serb has been a regular for Vozdovac this season. last_img read more


first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea striker Batshuayi on brink of sealing Monaco moveby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea striker Michy Batshuayi is close to sealing a move to AS Monaco.Chelsea are now in ‘advanced talks’ to loan Batshuayi to Monaco.The striker has been ditched by Valencia after a dismal first half to the season.But Thierry Henry is a fan and believes he can get goals from the Belgian, to fire his struggling side to safety.And a deal is now close. last_img read more


first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool, Arsenal must deal with Raiola to land AC Milan target Malenby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the lovePremier League clubs will have to deal with Mino Raiola if they’re to bring PSV Eindhoven striker Donyell Malen back to England.Liverpool and former club Arsenal are keen, along with AC Milan.Raiola is said to already have contacted AC Milan, which has fierce competition for Malen.Milan has already informed Raiola they’re interested in the 20-year-old attacker. PSV is said to be asking €30m, but the Italian club believes this is on the high side. It is said that 45 clubs have asked PSV to keep them informed of developments regarding Malen. In addition to AC Milan, Liverpool and his old club Arsenal are also keen on the attacker. last_img read more


first_imgWolves boss Nuno left frustrated after Southampton drawby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves boss Nuno was left frustrated after their 1-1 draw with Southampton.The visitors went ahead in sloppy circumstances from a Wolves perspective, as Danny Ings capitalised to slot home. Wolves showed the spirit to come back and equalise through Raul Jimenez’s penalty, and Nuno wants his team to learn from their performance and build on an improved second-half.He said, “I’m disappointed because one of the things we are, and must be, is solid and today we were not. Sometimes you have to stay in the game, Southampton broke us when we should be more solid in defence.“We created but not in the right areas we should. We played long, Southampton did very well, they pressed us very well, they were organised and are a very good team, they did a good job to make our task very hard in terms of possession of the ball.”He continued, “Sometimes it’s not what you want to do, it’s what the other team lets you do, but we should find better solutions. In the second-half we played better, we were more stable.“The goal we suffered was a mistake, we had to react, and we reacted OK, and then we pushed until the end.“It was not an easy game, it was a very tough game. It was very disrupted, not both teams controlling the game, we had an injury and didn’t play the way we should and could.“The game was very hard, we made mistakes, a lot of things happened in the game, so we have to improve for the next one.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


first_imgzoom With the impending adjustment to the Elbe fairway, Germany’s Port of Hamburg is preparing for the future also with improved infrastructure and digitalization.“We must get to grips with Industry 4.0, with digitalization and how this will change supply chains. We must develop the port to enable it to play a prominent role,” Frank Horch, Hamburg’s Senator for Economics, Transport and Innovation, said.“We will improve the infrastructure, implement the fairway adjustments and secure good general conditions,” Horch added.Once the adjustment to the Elbe fairway is finalized, the port will be able to handle more containers and bulk cargo.“Terminals and other port facilities are well prepared for growth. Increased draft on the Elbe and simplification of manoeuvring by the construction of a passing zone on the Elbe downstream from Hamburg will facilitate more efficient use of hold capacities and crucially simplify passing for ultra-large vessels,” Ingo Egloff, HHM Executive Board colleague, added.In the last business year, the port saw a stable handling result comparable with the previous year.At 136.5 million tons, in 2017 seaborne cargo throughput in Hamburg, comprising general and bulk cargoes, was stable at a high level. A slight downturn occurred in handling of containerized general cargo at 8.8 million TEU, being one percent lower. At 44.7 million tons, the bulk cargo total was at the previous year’s level.In 2017 Hamburg received 102 calls by ULCVs in the size bracket 18,000 to 20,000+ TEU, a rise of 52.2 percent.Furthermore, Egloff informed that positive effects on the flow of imports via the Port of Hamburg are expected from the revamping of Import VAT agreed in the current coalition deal in Berlin.This would eliminate a long-standing disadvantage vis-à-vis the Netherlands, with importers in future able to deduct Import Tax immediately.In Germany Import Turnover Tax has so far been paid immediately and only later allow for in advance notification of Turnover Tax.last_img read more


first_imgDubai: As the U.S. tries a new way to protect shipping across the Persian Gulf amid tensions with Iran, it finds itself sailing into uncertain waters. For decades, the U.S. has considered the waters of the Persian Gulf as critical to its national security. Through the gulf’s narrow mouth, the Strait of Hormuz, 20% of all crude oil sold passes onto the world market. Any disruption there likely will see energy prices spike. The U.S. has been willing to use its firepower to ensure that doesn’t happen. It escorted ships here in the so-called 1980s “Tanker War .” America fought its last major naval battle in these waters in 1988 against Iran. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US Now, the U.S. Navy is trying to put together a new coalition of nations to counter what it sees as a renewed maritime threat from Iran. But the situation decades later couldn’t be more different. The U.S. public is fatigued from years of Mideast warfare after the Sept. 11 attacks. The demand for Persian Gulf oil has switched to Asia. Gulf Arab nations poured billions of dollars into their own weapons purchases while inviting a host of nations to station their own forces here, even as infighting dominates their relations. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls Meanwhile, Iran finds itself backed into a corner and ready for a possible conflict it had 30 years for which to prepare. It stands poised this week to further break the terms of its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, over a year after President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew America from the accord and imposed crippling sanctions on the country. “It is plausible to imagine a scenario where these forces stumble into some type of accidental escalation,” said Becca Wasser, a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corp. who studies the region. “While U.S. efforts are intended to deter, Iran may view increased U.S. maritime presence as offensive in nature or as preparation for a larger attack on Iran and respond accordingly.” The U.S.-led Sentinel Program aims to secure the broader Persian Gulf region. It includes surveillance of the Strait of Hormuz and the Bab el-Mandeb, another narrow strait that connects the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden off Yemen and East Africa. Smaller patrol boats and other craft will be available for rapid response. The plan also allows for nations to escort their own ships through the region, said Cmdr. Joshua Frey, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet, which oversees the region. For now, the Bahrain-based 5th Fleet is not escorting U.S.-flagged ships through waters, though that remains a possibility, he said. So far, only Australia, Bahrain and the United Kingdom have said they’ll join the U.S. program. India has begun escorting its own ships independently of the U.S. coalition, while China has suggested it could get involved as well. The U.S. Navy has sent Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers to chokepoint positions, like either end of the Strait of Hormuz. There, they observe ship traffic and monitor for anything unusual as drones and other aircraft fly surveillance routes overhead, Frey said. Some of what the U.S. plan calls for already falls under the routine operations of the 5th Fleet, which has been in the region since 1995. U.S. Navy ships coming in and out of the Persian Gulf often find themselves shadowed by Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessels. Some incidents have seen the U.S. fire warning shots or Iranian forces test-fire missiles nearby. What’s different now though is shippers find themselves under attack. The U.S. blames Iran for the apparent limpet mine explosions on four vessels in May and another two in June sailing in the Gulf of Oman near the Strait of Hormuz, something Iran denies being behind. Iran also seized a British-flagged oil tanker and another based in the United Arab Emirates. Facing growing financial pressure from U.S. sanctions on its oil industry, Iran has sought diplomatic support from those still in the deal, while increasing pressure militarily as well. Even President Hassan Rouhani, who had supported rapprochement with the U.S. in the run-up to the 2015 deal, has been threatening to close off the Strait of Hormuz if Tehran can’t sell its oil abroad. “If someday, the United States decides to block Iran’s oil, no oil will be exported from the Persian Gulf,” he told a cheering crowd in December 2018. That raises the stakes for conflict. “The United States is not seeking a military confrontation, and are certainly not soliciting international support for any provocation,” Frey said. “With that said, while the intent of our presence is deterrence and stability, we are prepared to defend (coalition) member nations’ interests from attacks in the maritime domain.” But it won’t be just the United States involved if things spin out of control, nor will it likely be confined to the high seas. Since the 1980 Carter Doctrine, the U.S. has vowed to use its military power to defend its interests in the oil-rich Persian Gulf. That saw America enter the “Tanker War” toward the end of the 1980s Iran-Iraq war, in which U.S. naval ships escorted reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers. It culminated in a one-day naval battle between Washington and Tehran, and also saw America accidentally shoot down an Iranian passenger jet, killing 290 people. The 1991 Gulf War, in which a U.S.-led coalition expelled Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein’s troops from Kuwait, further cemented America’s presence, as did its later wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.last_img read more