first_imgQPR’s Massimo Luongo hit the woodwork twice in the first half of the derby at Griffin Park.Luongo headed Matt Phillips’ left-wing cross against the upright and went close again when his right-footed shot from the near the left-hand edge of the penalty area beat keeper David Button and struck the par post.Earlier, Tjaronn Chery had had a decent chance for the visitors and John Swift went close for Brentford.Chery sneaked behind Bees defender Harlee Dean to collect Daniel Tozser’s pass but the Dutchman’s attempted chip was well off target.On-loan Chelsea youngster Swift then tested Rob Green with a curling effort the Rangers keeper was able to gather.Brentford: Button; Yennaris; Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; McCormack, Diagouraga, Woods, Swift, Judge; Djuricin.Subs: Bonham, Hofmann, Kerschbaumer, Vibe, O’Connell, Gogia, Canos.QPR: Green; Onuoha, Hall, Hill, Konchesky; Henry, Tozser; Phillips, Luongo, Chery; Emmanuel-Thomas.Subs: Smithies, Austin, Doughty, Faurlin, Hoilett, Perch, Polter.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgIs The End of the RNA World Hypothesis Near Because Multiple Universes Are Needed for It?by Salvador CordovaA somewhat recent article in Quanta Magazine proclaimed the end of the RNA World Hypothesis. Charles Carter is a longtime critic of the RNA world. He was quoted as saying:Recent papers published in Biosystems and Molecular Biology and Evolution delineated why the RNA world hypothesis does not provide a sufficient foundation for the evolutionary events that followed. Instead, said Charles Carter, a structural biologist at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who co-authored the papers, the model represents “an expedient proposal.” “There’s no way that a single polymer could carry out all of the necessary processes we now characterize as part of life,” he added.So what is Carter’s alternative? Carter points out that it is necessary for some other things have to be there with the first life along with RNA such as “‘loading’ molecules called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.” Er, you mean sophisticated proteins!Theoretical self-replication of RNA (Illustra Media)The various origin-of-life theories were things like “RNA first” or “proteins first” or “metabolism first,”  etc. Few have entertained the idea of “everything first” since that looks too much like special creation. However, Carter unwittingly inches closer to the “everything first” model. How, for example, can one have a protein like an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase arise without a means of making it and regulating it? In fact, there have to be several of them, not just one since there are 20 amino acids. The best way to make them is to have DNA with instructions to make them, but then where does the DNA come from without proteins, and where do proteins come from without DNA? DNA transcribes to RNA and RNA translates to proteins and proteins synthesize DNA, and the cycle continues. This is a classic chicken-and-egg paradox where one asks, “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Under an “everything first” model, obviously the chicken.Charles Carter has been a long-time critic of the RNA world. Though he believes the RNA World hypothesis is just about to expire, bad theories that are dead factually have a way of walking around like the living-dead. Jonathan Wells uses the term “zombie science” to describe such theories. I’m afraid the RNA world hypothesis might not end anytime soon because like other zombie ideas, they are enthralling fictions. [By the way, one of my biochemistry teacher’s favorite shows was The Walking Dead.]Charles Carter has been ignored by most of the origin of life community. Why? He pointed out in an earlier paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry:Koonin estimates that assembling the replicative fidelity necessary for an RNA-only origin would require multiple universes.But it should be worth mentioning that Koonin accepts the existence of life in our universe as good evidence there are multiple universes! He said so in Biology Direct, where he proclaims confidently that the existence of “many worlds” resolves the problem of the RNA world’s improbability. From that leap of faith, he proclaims:A final comment on “irreducible complexity” and “intelligent design”. By showing that highly complex systems, actually, can emerge by chance and, moreover, are inevitable, if extremely rare, in the universe, the present model sidesteps the issue of irreducibility and leaves no room whatsoever for any form of intelligent design.Koonin is stepping out in faith here, because science has no way of detecting many worlds. He’s basing so much of his anti-intelligent design views on pure speculation. There could just as well be an ultimate Designer, and it is also hypothetically possible there is a single Designer for all the many worlds.I challenge those who reject the possibility of the Christian God and Creator with this thought, “Would you wager a thousand dollars in a casino based on the many-worlds hypothesis being true? If not, then why would you wager your soul?”Salvador Cordova has appeared on National TV, radio shows, newspapers, books and magazines for his work in promoting Intelligent Design and Creation Science. He is a former scientist and engineer in the aerospace and defense industry and presently serves as a professor and researcher in the area of Christian apologetics at small Bible College. He has four science degrees and is working on a PhD. For his previous entries on CEH, see his Author Profile.(Visited 1,044 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgDidi Sydown in a dance scene from Johann Strauss’ opera Die Fledermaus. Gerald Samaai, principal tenor for the Eoan Group, during a rehearsal at the Cape Town City Hall. May Abrahamse singing the role of Rosalinde in Eoan’s 1962 production of Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus.(Images: Cloete Breytenbach)MEDIA CONTACTS• Dr Hilde RoosEoan book project co-ordinator+27 21 808 2597Wilma den HartighA new book has been published to celebrate the 80th birthday of the Eoan Group, South Africa’s first grassroots amateur opera, ballet and drama organisation.Eoan – Our Story is the first book to tell the story of the relatively unknown group, which was established in 1933 by British immigrant Helen Southern-Holt, as a cultural and charity organisation in the former inner-city suburb of District Six in Cape Town.The publication is a project of the Documentation Centre for Music (Domus) at Stellenbosch University (SU). It was compiled by the Eoan History Project, with Dr Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller as editors.The Eoan Group played an important role in promoting the performance of classical music in South Africa, developing artistic talent and preserving the vibrant cultural heritage of District Six.This historic area is known for the forced removal of about 60 000 of its residents during the 1970s by the apartheid regime.The name Eoan comes from the Greek word ‘Eos’, the goddess of the dawn. In Greek mythology she is personified as the one who brings the hope of a new day. The group’s founder chose this name as it referred to her desire to bring hope and new opportunities to the community of District Six.Despite working under the constraints of apartheid, the organisation provided a platform where gifted actors, musicians and dancers could express their life’s calling.“Their story is inspirational. It is time to celebrate their memory,” says Roos.For many people who had talent, this was their only chance.“This is why the organisation was so important,” she says. “It gave people an opportunity to develop their talent and perform, even if these were limited opportunities.“There is no other group like this.”Important memories preserved in printThrough the book the Eoan History Project hopes to preserve the organisation’s history for future generations.The publication tells the story of Eoan’s establishment, but also shows the impact of the apartheid government’s racial policies on South African communities.“What is extraordinary about this group is that there is just about no other example in the country where the evolution of a cultural group and the development of the apartheid regime are so closely linked,” Roos says.When the Eoan Group started, their headquarters were situated in District Six and 15 branches were established throughout the Cape Peninsula by the mid-1950s. They offered a wide range of activities that included ballet, folk dance, speech, drama, singing, painting and sewing.After the destruction of District Six, the group moved to their new premises, the Joseph Stone Theatre in Athlone.Years later, documents and photos of Eoan’s productions were found at the theatre. The photos, permits for performances, letters and programmes were organised into an archive which has been housed at the SU Music Department since 2008.Roos says many stories about the group and its members were undocumented for years, and numerous oral accounts of their activities appear in this book for the first time.The book is an oral history and includes extracts from 47 interviews which have been structured in a narrative around themes such as opera and ballet productions, and is complemented by photos and other archive material.The interviews were done mainly with former Eoan members, most of which sang in the group’s opera productions.A bittersweet storyDuring the 1950s, Eoan performed to mixed audiences. But Roos says the group’s activities became more restricted as apartheid intensified in the 1960s.“It had a major impact on their performances, but they kept going amid the political difficulties,” she says.Eventually apartheid legislation completely prohibited mixed audiences. To comply with these requirements, the group applied for permits to perform in the City Hall for mixed audiences from 1966 onwards.Roos says the group suffered a setback when they were forced to accept financial support from the apartheid government’s coloured affairs department, which caused their standing and support in the community to suffer.“They were forced into a tricky compromise,” she says. “They needed funding to put on performances but they also didn’t want to betray their community.”Despite these conditions, they remained successful and popular, and this was widely reflected in ticket sales and media coverage.Outstanding performances, against all oddsDuring their artistic peak from the 1950s to 1970s, the group often performed to packed houses in Cape Town’s best concert halls.Eoan performed the first full-length indigenous jazz ballet by a local composer for a South African ballet group. The Square by Stanley Glasser was about gang life in District Six.From 1956 until the late 1970s the group had an active amateur opera section which performed at arts festivals and annual opera seasons and toured throughout South Africa (1960 and 1965) and the United Kingdom (1975).In 1956 they performed Verdi’s La Traviata in the Cape Town City Hall, Eoan’s artistic home before apartheid legislation forced them to move to Athlone.By 1977 they had eleven operas in their repertoire: three by Verdi, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and La Bohème, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Bizet’s Carmen, Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci and Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana.Making a name overseasSome of Eoan’s members went on to build successful international careers.“Many of them went abroad, got bursaries and took their chance at better opportunities,” Roos says. “Some big names emerged from the group.”They were mostly dancers, but a handful of singers also made it overseas, despite not having access to good vocal training in South Africa.One of the group’s success stories is Vincent Hantam. According to Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, Hantam danced most of the principal roles with Scottish Ballet from 1975 to 1991, and has performed with many companies on the local and international stage.Tenor Joseph Gabriels was discovered by Joseph Manca, musical director of the Eoan Group.“He had an exceptional voice,” Roos says.He received no musical or vocal training while in South Africa, but in 1967 he secured a bursary from the Schneier family of Johannesburg to study in Milan.In 1969 he won the famous Verdi competition in Busseto. He made his debut in 1971 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Canio in I Pagliacci – the first South African to sing there.The Eoan Group stopped performing operas in 1977, but the company still exists today and they focus on dance productions.According to the team who compiled the book, the interviews with former Eoan members show how much people invested into the arts through the group, the extraordinary circumstances in which they had to operate, and the influential role that the group played in so many lives.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The second week of Feeding Farmers 2016, sponsored by AgriGold, took the Ohio Ag Net crew near the Indiana-Ohio state line to Green Oak Farms in Preble County. A notable turnout joined the team for lunch on the grain and livestock farm.Gary Long runs the grain side of the large operation. He talked with Dale Minyo about their planting season this year and the operation overall. Gary Long being interviewed by Dale Minyo Gale Long of Green Oak Farms boasts an impressive classic tractor collectionlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our weather pattern looks to calm down and dry out some over the coming week to 10 days. In fact, in the next week, we have only one minor chance of moisture for the entire state, and the totals there are significantly lower than our look at the same system last week. So, it seems we finally are trying to morph into some semblance of a normal July weather pattern. We are dry today, tomorrow and most of Wednesday, as sunshine dominates. We saw a different air mass move into eastern corn belt yesterday behind the frontal passage Saturday and yesterday morning. This will lead to lower humidity values still over the next 3 days, although we will slowly walk those humidity values higher the closer we get to Wednesday afternoon and evening. Clouds will also begin to increase Wednesday afternoon and evening. Our one somewhat organized chance of moisture over the next week comes Thursday, as a cold front looks to sag through the state. This front looks significantly less impressive than it did last week, and at this point we would suggest only a few hundredths to a tenth or two across 60% of the state. Those totals are lower and the coverage well below our look from last week. There will be plenty of areas that miss out on that action. However, one area to watch later Thursday afternoon will be far east and southeast Ohio, where we can see a strengthening of action. Most of the thunderstorms likely miss us east into Western PA, but we need to keep an eye out for some totals up closer to half an inch before midnight Thursday night. Behind that front, we go dry again for Friday and then the weekend too. Humidity values back off, and we should see good evaporation. That will be another good window for field and forage work.Early next week looks interesting. We cant rule out a few scattered showers Monday over the western half of Ohio. These are mostly a product of some heat based instability, but totals will be under a quarter of an inch, an coverage will be only about 40%. But, the interesting part of the pattern comes from something else. We are watching a tropical system that seems to be headed for the gulf coast areas late this week and weekend. That storm is being projected to move north, and its remains may make it through the Tennessee valley and into the lower Ohio valley early next week. IF that comes to be, that would spell showers for southern Indiana and Illinois next Monday, and then a slow spread north through Tuesday and perhaps Wednesday. AT this time, models are projecting some of this tropical moisture moving into far western OH, mostly west of I-75 on Tuesday. However, without that tropical moisture pushing north, we should be able to continue a dry pattern. So, at this time we feel comfortable saying that most of Ohio stays dry for Tuesday and Wednesday, but we really have to watch the western areas. Models typically get way overzealous on the first tropical system or two, but with this one in July, rather than May or June…we don’t want to dismiss anything too quickly. The map below shows 10 day rain potential and includes some tropical influence on western Ohio at this time…in fact, that is the only reason we have some of those bigger rain totals in the west. Temps over the next 10 days will be near normal. As humidity builds, we have to leave the door open to temps feeling much warmer than normal, but we think overall, this is a typical July set up on temps. The combination of temps and some rain free days should be very beneficial to a large part of the state.last_img read more


first_imgLATEST STORIES SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte “Wala. Kulitan lang yung kay Terrence. Alam mo naman yun makulit,” Pogoy told reporters.(It’s nothing. We were just fooling around. We all know Terrence, he’s playful.)Romeo, who was traded to the Beermen in the offseason four months ago, ended up having the last laugh after scoring 14 points to help his team steamroll the KaTropa, 96-86, and secure a semifinals seat.Pogoy led TNT with 16 points that went with five rebounds and a block.ADVERTISEMENT Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Philippine Arena Interchange inauguratedcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ ‘Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance PLAY LIST 01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Terrence Romeo and Roger Pogoy go head to head. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—San Miguel Beer guard Terrence Romeo and his former team TNT had a well-documented fallout that it’s no secret the two sides have bad blood between each other.With Beermen and the KaTropa sharing long history as rivals, it didn’t come as a surprise that for several instances in their do-or-die Game 3 on Wednesday, the players-one way or another-got into each others’ heads.ADVERTISEMENT Romeo and ex-teammate Roger Pogoy nearly reached their boiling point late in the first quarter that they had to be separated to keep the situation from escalating.The two, who stared down each other, downplayed the incident as expected.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“Wala sakin yun, niloloko ko lang si Pogoy,” said Romeo, who instigated the situation after invading Pogoy’s space after scoring on a layup despite being fouled by his former Gilas teammate.🎥 Naiwanan ni Terrence Romeo yung bantay, layup is good MAY KASAMA PANG FOUL!#PBAPlayoffs#PBALabanKungLaban pic.twitter.com/CgorguECUl— PBA (@pbaconnect) April 10, 2019(That’s nothing to me. I was just messing with Pogoy.)ADVERTISEMENT Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess View comments Test of character as FEU enters crucial homestretch in Final 4 chaselast_img read more