first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device. ALAMEDA — The Raiders have claimed former Green Bay Packers and Cleveland Browns quarterback DeShone Kizer off waivers.Kizer was waived by Green Bay on Saturday with Tim Boyce earning the job to back up Aaron Rodgers. Green Bay opted to keep two quarterbacks.When the Raiders reached their initial 53-man roster, they had three quarterbacks — Derek Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. Kizer makes four. General …last_img read more


first_img(Visited 273 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Lee Berger’s remarkable cache of hominid bones found deep in a South African cave is generating a lot of news, but major questions remain.At one level, it’s a great adventure story: squeezing through narrow cave passages and finding bones all over the floor, so hard to reach that a team of skinny female investigators had to be recruited to map and retrieve them. But at a scientific level, what these bones mean is not clear. Lee Berger (champion of Australopithecus sediba, 12/08/11) has given the bones a new species name within our genus: Homo naledi. He is almost as controversial, however, as the fossils themselves.The bones appear to be from about 15 individuals. No other mammal bones were found there, leading to speculations it was an intentional burial site. The skeletons seem to be mosaics of human and australopith features; some think they fit within Homo erectus. But since no dates have been assigned to the fossils yet, even evolutionary paleoanthropologists are reluctant to draw conclusions.It’s premature, therefore, to evaluate this find. What we can do is draw attention to the variety of opinions in the press.Evolutionary OpinionsHomo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa (eLife). This is the lead paper by Berger et al. announcing the find.Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa (eLife). This companion paper describes the conditions in which the bones were found.Crowdsourcing digs up an early human species (Nature). This news article begins with a photo of Lee Berger smiling triumphantly outside Rising Star Cave where the bones were found. Ewen Callaway describes how Berger recruited cavers to excavate the room deep inside the cave, and gives some preliminary opinions of other paleoanthropologists.New human species discovered (Science Magazine). Veteran hominid news reporter Ann Gibbons describes the process of finding the fossils, giving Lee Berger a chance to assure readers that his expedition”isn’t a media stunt.”South Africa’s new human ancestor sparks racial row (PhysOrg). Some South Africans are taking offense at possible racial overtones to the evolutionary claims made about Homo naledi.From the archives: The scientist behind those controversial new hominin fossils (Science Magazine). Michael Balter asks “Why is this enthusiastic paleontologist so controversial?” and points to a 2011 feature story about Lee Berger.New Human Ancestor Elicits Awe—and Many Questions (National Geographic). Jamie Shreeve discusses frustration over not having dates for the bones, and perplexity of how they got there. The possibility of radiocarbon dating is discussed.Mystery Lingers Over Ritual Behavior of New Human Ancestor (National Geographic). This entry begins with artwork of creatures with human-like bodies but ape-like facial features carrying their dead into the cave for burial. Writer Nadia Drake discusses whether ritual behavior over death of kin is unique to humans.Human Evolution 101 (National Geographic). Nadia Drake takes advantage of the news about Homo naledi to ask leading questions like, “Why are scientists certain that human evolution happened?”12 Theories of How We Became Human, and Why They’re All Wrong (National Geographic). Balancing out Drake’s positivism, Mark Strauss recounts the many ideas about human evolution that have fallen by the wayside over the years. He doesn’t mention Homo naledi.Opinion: What about Homo naledi’s geologic age? (PhysOrg). Darren Curnoe laments over not having established a geological age for the fossils. “Its just the sort of thing that infuriates many scientists and detracts from an otherwise significant discovery; pity really.”New species of extinct human found in cave may rewrite history (New Scientist). Colin Barras includes photos of the fossils, artwork of the presumed facial features, and a map of the cave chamber where they were found. “ONE thousand four hundred bones, 140 teeth, belonging to at least 15 individual skeletons – and that’s just what was recovered in a single short field session,” he begins.Homo naledi: Unanswered questions about the newest human species (New Scientist). Rowan Hooper briefly discusses the main questions regarding the find. “We don’t even know how old H. naledi was. It could be millions of years old, making it one of the very earliest species of Homo, or only tens or hundreds of thousands of years old, making it a relict species of human that survived into modern times,” he says. “…The team say it may be possible to use isotope testing to age the remains, and that no attempt has yet been made to extract DNA.”Researcher argues that there’s more to the genus Homo than we may think (PhysOrg). This is not specifically about Homo naledi. Joe Miksch discusses the views of Jeffrey Schwarz, who complains, “If we want to be objective, we shall almost certainly have to scrap the iconic list of (genus and species) names in which hominid fossil specimens have historically been trapped and start from the beginning.”Non-Evolutionary OpinionsHomo naledi as Spin Detector (Evolution News & Views). Ann Gauger gives an intelligent-design perspective on the bones, taking issue with some of the initial interpretations, providing quotes that illustrate spin doctoring. Her earlier piece on ENV also concentrates on separating fact from interpretation. Gauger was co-author with Douglas Axe and Casey Luskin of the Discovery Institute book, Science and Human Origins.Scientists dispute ‘new’ species discovery (World Magazine). Casey Luskin gets a quote in Daniel James Devine’s article on Homo naledi, a fairly straightforward account of the find. Luskin comments, “Whenever you hear the word ‘mosaic’ in evolutionary lingo, what that means is this species does not fit very well into our preferred phylogenic scheme.” In World, an ID-friendly Christian news magazine, Devine says that Berger admits “the fossils might be only tens of thousands of years old.” He also points out that “some scientists dispute Berger’s contention that all 1,500 bones came from the same species.”What to make of Homo naledi? More pseudo-scientific claims of human ancestry (CMI). Marc Ambler discusses the flamboyant character of Lee Berger. He notes that all other fossils in the area had been australopiths. Central point is cautionary:One will have to wait and see whether the evolutionary scientific community come down on the side of the remains being Homo, or just Australopithecus. But why label the remains Homo naledi if there is so much indication that these may have been ordinary humans with some unique anatomical variations just as there are variations today between different people groups but all descended from the first two people created by God—Adam and Eve? University of California’s Tim White, who holds a different interpretation of human evolution, believes the remains belong to the species H. erectus, named in the 19th century. He is reported as saying that “New species should not be created willy-nilly. In order to claim a new species one has to demonstrate that it’s different from anything that’s ever been known.”Homo naledi, a New Human Ancestor? (ICR). Frank Sherwin gives his initial take on the fossils, ending with a suggestion that the individuals are more ape-like than human-like, pointing to doubts about the intentional burial interpretation. Incidentally, ICR is about to release its new 4-part DVD production on the human body, Made in His Image; click here for trailer and information.Other Human-Evolution NewsAlmost buried in the news about Homo naledi was another major announcement about Homo bones in a cave in Spain. In Science Magazine, Ann Gibbons writes about the new dates assigned to Denisovans, ranging from 50,000 to as much as 170,000 years ago. Gibbons thinks “they help solidify our murky view of Denisovans,” but can such a vast range of dates be plausible for individuals with many of the capabilities of Neanderthals and modern humans? And how much can be learned from a tiny fragment of a pinky fingerbone? “Denisovans occupied Denisova Cave repeatedly over more than 100,000 years,” she claims in a related Science Magazine article without winking a skeptical eye. “Neandertals slipped in as well, and modern humans were the last to live there.”Gibbons also claimed in a recent Science Magazine piece that Neanderthal DNA is shaking up the family tree. But that’s old news. She leaves science for the humanities in “Humanity’s Long, Lonely Road,” speculating this way and that about the relationships of Denisovans, Neanderthals and so-called modern humans (although the differences between all three are slight). Her speculations put modern humans on a long, lonely road as far back as 3/4 of a million years ago. “That would mean that the ancestors of humans were already wandering down a solitary path, apart from the other kinds of archaic humans on the planet, 100,000 to 400,000 years earlier than expected.” It sure took these lookalikes a long time to learn farming.Most curious in the early-man news is Michael Balter’s suggestion in Science Magazine that the “world’s oldest oatmeal” may have been discovered in an Italian cave. Estimated 32,000 years old, that would make it 25,000 years before the invention of farming. One would think they would tire of the same breakfast cereal after two weeks, let alone 25,000 years.New Scientist, meanwhile, drags in climate change to explain “key moments in human evolution.” Climate change becomes an all-purpose gimmick for explaining any evolutionary mystery, but it has a problem: why didn’t all the other species change accordingly? It explains opposite outcomes; therefore, it explains nothing.Eskimos are human, aren’t they? Sure they are. But changes to their stature—genetic mutations and all—occurred rapidly (geologically speaking) due to their high fat diet, Julie Hussin writes in The Conversation. She attributes this to natural selection, but hey: the Inuit can marry Europeans or Chinese and have happy kids.It’s an appropriate time to remember Ian Tattersal and Jeffrey Schwarz’s critical comments in Science Magazine about defining the genus Homo. These veteran paleoanthropologists think their colleagues have been going about it all wrong. There is no simple ancestor-descendent relationship to be found in human fossils. “If we want to be objective, we shall almost certainly have to scrap the iconic list of names in which hominin fossil specimens have historically been trapped, and start from the beginning by hypothesizing morphs, building testable theories of relatedness, and rethinking genera and species.” What does that imply for “Homo naledi“?In conclusion, we remind readers that “the myth of the missing link does science no favors,” as Sean Nee argues in The Conversation. Depending on the traits one focuses on, or one’s starting metanarrative, any story of relationships can be concocted; “we must choose our metaphors wisely, lest we be misled,” he says. “The Great Chain of Being, strung through evolutionary space by Blind Watchmakers, with missing links waiting to be discovered, isn’t going to help us understand infectious disease” or anything else that matters to us. Fossils like those announced by Lee Berger need to be interpreted on their own terms.Update 9/21/15: At Evolution News & Views, Casey Luskin provides a detailed look at four major controversies about these fossils, including their classification, whether they were buried or chase into the cave, whether they comprise multiple species, and more. He provides many quotes from the literature.We provide these links as preliminary coverage regarding so-called Homo naledi. Obviously many questions are floating around, and without dates, even the evolutionists don’t know what to think. If original unfossilized tissue or radiocarbon is found, the evolutionary story will be moot; evolutionists would have to claim, like with Homo floresiensis (the “hobbit”) that the creatures were relicts of earlier evolution, caught in some kind of refugium away from evolving modern humans. That would seem hard to maintain. Rather than rely on the opinions of experts, go to the original papers and read them critically, asking the kinds of questions evolutionists don’t think about.In a profound new peer-reviewed paper in Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, creation geneticist John Sanford and team have shown that human evolution is unworkable anyway. There is simply not enough time, using realistic models of fixation and population size, for the mutations needed to change an ape into a man to have occurred (this is similar to the argument against whale evolution in the new film Living Waters). And that’s only one of numerous falsifications of neo-Darwinism.With unguided mechanisms off the table, the only rational alternative for interpreting the bones from Rising Star Cave will be to start with intelligent design or Genesis 1.last_img read more


first_imgEls, who had begun the last day six shots off the pace, played the last nine holes in 32 shots, with four birdies and no drops. The win came as a big surprise, although he had previously done well when The Open Championship had been hosted at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes, finishing tied for second in 1996 and tied for third in 2001. However, his last victory had been in December 2010 in the South African Open. “For some reason I’ve got some belief this week, I feel something special can happen,” Ernie Els said after his third round in The Open Championship at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes. A day later, his words turned prophetic as he captured his fourth major title and his first in a decade. ThanksEls also took the opportunity to thank former President Nelson Mandela for what he has done for South Africa, Johan Rupert for his support of golf in South Africa, and his caddie Ricky Roberts. Four consecutive drops Scott had appeared on course for his first major title despite a hesitant opening, which saw him drop three shots and add a birdie in the first six holes. When he sank another birdie on the 14th, it appeared that he had sealed the deal, but then came those four consecutive drops, including a “how did that happen” miss of a three-footer on the 16th. TurnaroundIt has been quite a turnaround for Els, who missed out on the US Masters earlier this year, having failed to qualify for the event for the first time since 1993. A bogey on the last hole of the US Open meant he failed to qualify for the 2013 Masters. Now, with the South African a major winner again, that concern is a thing of the past. South Africa’s Thomas Aiken tied for seventh after finishing on one-under-par 279 after rounds of 68, 68, 71 and 72. Then, addressing his family, Els continued with a smile: “I’m going to try and come and see you this evening [in London]. I’m supposed to go to Canada, but I think I’m going to blow that thing off … I’ll maybe get to Canada on Tuesday,” a comment which once more had the crowd laughing. After three days of forgiving conditions at Royal Lytham and Saint Annes, the course turned tough on Sunday and Els handled that pressure best to come from behind to take victory as the third round leader Adam Scott’s game fell apart on the inward nine. If one looked closely, though, the signs were there that the man known as “The Big Easy” was on the way back. In the previous major, he returned the best putting statistics in the US Open at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, where he finished ninth, three shots behind the winner, Webb Simpson. Els was gracious in his acceptance speech and addressed runner-up Scott first. “I feel for my buddy Adam Scott,” he said on the 18th green.center_img ‘You’re going to win many of these’“Scotty, you’re a great player, a great friend of mine, we’ve had some great battles in the past. I feel very fortunate and you’re going to win many of these, you’ve got too much talent [not to].” 23 July 2012 “I’m pretty disappointed because I had it in my hands with four to go and I managed to hit a poor shot on each of the closing four holes, which costs you a bogey, and that’s what happens on a course like this. I’m very disappointed, but I played so beautifully for most of the week, I certainly shouldn’t let this bring me down,” he said afterwards in a television interview. He closed with a two-under-par 68, the best round among the third round front-runners, while Scott, who led by four shots after three rounds, following a course record six-under-par 64, a 67 and a 68, fell apart with bogeys on each of the last four holes to stumble to a 75. He recalled talking to Sheryl Calder, known as “the Eye Doctor”, who has helped him with his putting, early in the year. “When I saw her in January,” Els recounted, “she said we were going to win a major this year and I thought she was crazy and here we are right now.” Tiger Woods finished in a tie for third with Brandt Snedeker, four shots behind Els on three-under-par 277. Woods’ challenge for a 15th major, but his first since the 2008 US Open, was undone by a seven on the par-four sixth hole. Louis Oosthuizen, the Open champion in 2010, closed with a 73 to end in a tie for 19th place on one-over 281. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Later, he joked: “I had a lot of support this week, but you guys have to ask yourselves, were you being nice to me or did you believe I could win,” which drew loud laughter from the big crowd.last_img read more


first_imgGetting into drone video production? Here are some tips for getting great footage and some must-know information for new pilots.Love them or hate them, drones are now a big part of video production. Not only do they allow you to quickly capture aerial shots in minutes, they have also become so agile that they can be flown at a low altitude to replicate traditional crane moves.In this post, we will be covering some basics of drone flight: the terms you should be using, no-fly zones, flying for commercial use, and the upcoming FAA drone registration and regulations.Flight TerminologyWhen in flight, you need to know the correct terms to communicate effectively with your crew. This is the same principle as traditional camera movements. You need to know what to do when a shot calls for a pan or tilt.When a drone is in flight, it can move in three dimensions. These axes are lateral, vertical, and longitudinal. Based on the drone’s center of mass, the flight parameters allow the aircraft to move in those three dimensions. In layman’s terms, you can control the drone to move forwards and backwards, up and down, and side to side. 1. YawA yaw changes the direction the drone faces by turning the aircraft to the left and right on the vertical axis.  This is the same as turning your head to the left or right.2. PitchA pitch angles the drone’s nose up or down to move the aircraft forward or backward. This is the equivalent of looking up or down.3. RollA roll angles the drone’s body to the left or fight to move the aircraft side to side. While always looking forward, tilt your head to the left of right. Flying for Commercial Use (in the United States)At the time of writing, it is still illegal to fly a drone for commercial purposes without a license. This includes creating videos for clients. There will be new legislation in the coming months that will allow commercial use after registering your aircraft with the Federal Aviation Administration or FAA. The terms are still not known.Image via Federal Aviation AdministrationHowever, you can still fly your drone and shoot video for hobby purposes, as long as it’s recreational. Your other option is to apply for an FAA Section 333 Exemption which will allow you to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems, like a drone, for commercial use. These exemptions are issued on a case-by-case basis, so it’s not guaranteed that you will received approval to fly.Every country has their own various flight laws, so be sure you read up before you take flight. No Fly ZonesThe final thing we will cover is the ever-important No-Fly Zone. No-Fly Zones should be taken very seriously, as violating that airspace is a federal matter. There are four main types of No Fly Zones.1. Major AirportsThere is a No-Fly Zone around every major airport and most medium-sized airports. There is a five mile No-Fly Zone radius around an airport.2. U.S. Military BasesThese No-Fly Zones are directly above every military base of any size.3. U.S. National ParksAll National Parks are No-Fly Zones, so don’t even plan on flying over Old Faithful or by Mount Rushmore. Flying in a National Park is a good way to get tazed.4. Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR)These temporary No-Flight Zones are created for special events, usually with very large crowds. These are issued for sporting events like every NFL and NCAA football game, Major League Baseball games, NASCAR and Indy Car races, as well as any major event that applies for an FAA airspace waiver.Pursuant to 49 USC 40103(b), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) classifies the airspace defined in this NOTAM as ‘National Defense Airspace’. Any person who knowingly or willfully violates the rules pertaining to operations in this airspace may be subject to certain criminal penalties under 49 USC 46307. Pilots… may be intercepted, detained and interviewed by law enforcement/security personnel. – Sporting Event Temporary Flight Restriction FDC NOTAM 4/3621If you are planning a flight, I highly recommend Don’t Fly Drones Here. This is a great interactive map that features all No Fly Zones and is constantly updated with Temporary Flight Restrictions, so you will know if there are any places you shouldn’t be.If you are looking to buy your first drone, be sure to check out our definitive drone buying guide.Drone model from TF3DM user ysup12last_img read more


first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Euronav Belgian tanker shipping company Euronav ended the first quarter of 2019 with a net gain of USD 19.5 million, compared to a net loss of USD 39.1 million seen in the corresponding period a year earlier.EBITDA for Q1 2019 was USD 124 million, compared to USD 25.7 million recorded in Q1 2018.“There are positive signals from the tanker market at present. Firstly, Euronav delivered VLCC rates of USD 35,000 per day (same as Q4) despite 1.2m bpd OPEC cuts and 28 new VLCC equivalents entering the global fleet during Q1,” Hugo De Stoop, current CFO and future CEO of Euronav, commented.“Secondly, US crude exports are running around 30% higher year on year. Thirdly, asset prices which historically have been a key valuation indicator for investors, continue to rise in both new build and secondhand values,” he added.During the quarter, Euronav delivered the Suezmax vessel Felicity to a supplier and operator of offshore floating platforms. The ship will be converted into an FPSO.In addition, the company entered in Q1 2019 into a sale agreement regarding the LR1 Genmar Compatriot. Sold for USD 6.75 million, the vessel will be delivered to its new owners in the course of May 2019.As part of its capital allocation strategy, Euronav has the option of buying its own shares back. The company started buying back shares on Euronext Brussels opportunistically in December 2018. As of the end of March 2019, Euronav retained around USD 785 million of liquidity.In February 2019, Euronav’s CEO Paddy Rodgers announced his decision to step down from his role this year. The CFO Hugo De Stoop was selected to succeed Rodgers, effective from May 9, 2019. The company has now started a search for a new CFO.With regards to the outlook for the remainder of the year, Euronav said that the resilience of freight rates during Q1 is “an encouraging signal”. However, some seasonal freight rate weakness during the spring/summer period is expected.“Refinery maintenance programs are more detailed and more prolonged this year than previous years and are likely to bring seasonal freight rate pressure forward to the second quarter,” Stoop explained.“However, with increased cargo supply expected in the second half along with reduced tanker capacity from IMO induced retrofitting and potentially more Iranian vessels leaving the trading fleet, the outlook for the second half is encouraging,” he concluded.Based in Antwerp, Euronav currently owns and operates a fleet of 2 ULCCs, 43 VLCCs, 25 Suezmaxes and 2 FSO vessels — both owned in 50%-50% joint venture.last_img read more