first_imgA brave showing by St Eunans simply wasn’t enough to see them progress in the Ulster Club Championship against Crossmaglen Rangers at the Athletic Grounds.The Letterkenny side were always on the backfoot after the Armagh champions got off to an early lead and eventually lost 3-11 to 1-7.An early Kyle Carragher goal for Crossmaglen didn’t help Eunans cause. However they managed to keep in touch with some fine points from Conal Dunne and Mark McGowan to leave Crossmaglen 1-6 to 0-4 ahead at half-time.Big John Haran gave Eunans huge hope when he rattled the net just after the restart.However that hope was dashed when free-kick ace Mark McGowan was red-carded just after that.And sensing that Eunans were wounded, Crossmaglen rubbed salt in the wounds as Aaron Kernan netted again for the Armagh team. The evergreen Oisin McConville made it 2-10 to 1-5 as the Glen began to turn the screw.Indeed but for a point blank save from JP Clarke, Eunans could have then found themselves even further behind.That fear became a reality when Paul Grant forced Clarke to pick the ball out of his net for a third time to make it 3-11 to 1-6 for Crossmaglen.Crossmaglen (Armagh) will now play Errigal Ciaran (Tyrone) in the semi-final.ST EUNAN’S OUTCLASSED BY ALL-IRELAND CHAMPIONS CROSSMAGLEN was last modified: November 11th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ST EUNAN’S OUTCLASSED BY ALL-IRELAND CHAMPIONS CROSSMAGLENlast_img read more


first_imgTV presenter Penny Lebyane speaks candidly about her post-natal depression in the short documentary Let’s Talk A group of health professionals pose for a picture during a workshop that was part of Sadag’s rural outreach programme on mental illness. One of many promotional pictures used by Sadag to drive the message home. A group of women in the KwaZulu-Natal area of Verulam attend a workshop on forming support groups in rural communities across South Africa.(Images: Sadag) MEDIA CONTACTS • Brigitte Taim Lange Strategic Communications +27 2 442 3083 RELATED ARTICLES • Boosting mental health reportage • Celebrities on sale for charity • Research says rooibos tea beats stress • Healthcare in South Africa Valencia TalanePeople with mental illnesses owe it to themselves to respond to the challenges of their conditions by seeking help and treatment to regain control of their lives. To achieve this, they must first be aware of their condition and what treatment is available to manage it.A social media campaign called ‘Let’s Talk Mental Health Awareness’ has been running since August in South Africa and aims to remove the stigma attached to mental illnesses.The situation, organisers believe, can improve if those who live with mental conditions talk about their struggles, cast off the associated shame, and encourage others to come forward to receive help from trained professionals.The project is a joint effort between the South African Depression and Anxiety Group (Sadag) and Pharma Dynamics, a company that provides generic medication for depression and anxiety.Embracing mental illnessThe initiative puts faces of well-known media personalities to different mental conditions that are familiar to a large number of South Africans. A short film, titled Let’s Talk, was produced as part of the campaign and made available on YouTube to reach large numbers. The release coincided with World Mental Health Day, which is celebrated on 10 October and is recognised by the World Health Organisation.Veteran actress Lilian Dube likens her experience a few years back to a feeling of being in a bottomless pit, even when around lots of people. She suffered from depression for many years without knowing what it was or how she could get help.Dube, along with others like television presenter Penny Lebyane and former Mr South Africa and now presenter of his own medical programme, Dr Michael Mol, talk candidly about their struggles with mental illnesses.“If you form a support group then you know you’re not alone,” Dube suggests. “The feeling of thinking you’re alone in your journey is the most terrible.” A leader of one such support group, Driekie Moutinho, agrees and says people with mental illnesses have to take a proactive approach to managing them.Psychiatrist Ian Westmore touches on the element of trust and says that people with mental Illnesses should understand that doctors have not only a good understanding of brain diseases, but know how to effectively treat most of them.“Mental illness is not a death sentence,” says Dr Gerhard Glober. “People with mental illness can have full, productive lives provided they recognise their needs.”Policy changes neededAs is the case with other health services in South Africa, there are disparities between treatment facilities for mental illnesses for urban and rural communities.People in urban areas have access to built-up facilities, healthcare professionals and treatment in abundance, while this is not the case for sufferers in rural areas.A concern among professionals in the mental health industry is that it is this population of patients, who live far away from ever-advancing facilities, who are more vulnerable because many lack awareness.A change in the overall health strategy of the country is needed, asserts psychiatrist Franco Colin.“The focus, from the national government’s perspective, is on tuberculosis, HIV, infant mortality, maternal health and violence-related trauma,” he said. “And psychology touches on each and every one of those areas.”Westmore agrees: “We get so little of the health budgets, while the private sector provides plans that do not cover mental health sufficiently.” His view is that there needs to be equity as far as mental conditions are concerned.Chilling factsResearch by Sadag reveals that one in five South Africans suffers from mental illness, while two in 100 children could be depressed. Experts worry that socio-economic factors like poverty and inequality as well as trauma and violence, which could in turn lead to substance abuse, continue to add to the pressure faced by the nation.Cassey Chambers, director of operations at Sadag, notes that mental illness is a big problem not only in South Africa, but most developing countries worldwide. All the more reason why, she says, campaigns like Let’s Talk should receive as much support as possible.“It’s not only sufferers who should be targeted, but also those who provide care for them.”Between 35% and 41% of pregnant or new mothers are victims of depression.As many as 23 people take their lives, and another 230 attempt to do so, in South Africa every day. The threat, many of the experts interviewed for Let’s Talk agree, lies in conditions being ignored or misunderstood for long periods of time.Television and film actress Bonnie Henna, who has appeared in international productions like Catch a Fire and Hotel Rwanda, recently revealed her struggles with clinical depression in an autobiography titled Eyebags and Dimples.Henna says in the book that for many years she lived with clinical depression and did not know it. Her father was murdered when she was only five years old and throughout her childhood and early adulthood her relationship with her mother, who later also discovered she had depression, was very strained.“Let’s Talk is certainly South Africa’s most ambitious mental health programme yet,” says Mariska Fouche, public affairs manager for Pharma Dynamics, adding that thousands of people have visited the campaign website since its launch.The campaign attracted many testimonials from teenagers to members of the elderly community, who said they were lonely and felt alienated. These were their biggest obstacles to fighting the conditions they live with, most commonly depression and anxiety.“We’ve invested a lot in the campaign,” says Fouche, “and we hope the film will start a large social media movement and help change attitudes and taboos that still exist around mental illness.”last_img read more


first_imgDidi Sydown in a dance scene from Johann Strauss’ opera Die Fledermaus. Gerald Samaai, principal tenor for the Eoan Group, during a rehearsal at the Cape Town City Hall. May Abrahamse singing the role of Rosalinde in Eoan’s 1962 production of Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus.(Images: Cloete Breytenbach)MEDIA CONTACTS• Dr Hilde RoosEoan book project co-ordinator+27 21 808 2597Wilma den HartighA new book has been published to celebrate the 80th birthday of the Eoan Group, South Africa’s first grassroots amateur opera, ballet and drama organisation.Eoan – Our Story is the first book to tell the story of the relatively unknown group, which was established in 1933 by British immigrant Helen Southern-Holt, as a cultural and charity organisation in the former inner-city suburb of District Six in Cape Town.The publication is a project of the Documentation Centre for Music (Domus) at Stellenbosch University (SU). It was compiled by the Eoan History Project, with Dr Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller as editors.The Eoan Group played an important role in promoting the performance of classical music in South Africa, developing artistic talent and preserving the vibrant cultural heritage of District Six.This historic area is known for the forced removal of about 60 000 of its residents during the 1970s by the apartheid regime.The name Eoan comes from the Greek word ‘Eos’, the goddess of the dawn. In Greek mythology she is personified as the one who brings the hope of a new day. The group’s founder chose this name as it referred to her desire to bring hope and new opportunities to the community of District Six.Despite working under the constraints of apartheid, the organisation provided a platform where gifted actors, musicians and dancers could express their life’s calling.“Their story is inspirational. It is time to celebrate their memory,” says Roos.For many people who had talent, this was their only chance.“This is why the organisation was so important,” she says. “It gave people an opportunity to develop their talent and perform, even if these were limited opportunities.“There is no other group like this.”Important memories preserved in printThrough the book the Eoan History Project hopes to preserve the organisation’s history for future generations.The publication tells the story of Eoan’s establishment, but also shows the impact of the apartheid government’s racial policies on South African communities.“What is extraordinary about this group is that there is just about no other example in the country where the evolution of a cultural group and the development of the apartheid regime are so closely linked,” Roos says.When the Eoan Group started, their headquarters were situated in District Six and 15 branches were established throughout the Cape Peninsula by the mid-1950s. They offered a wide range of activities that included ballet, folk dance, speech, drama, singing, painting and sewing.After the destruction of District Six, the group moved to their new premises, the Joseph Stone Theatre in Athlone.Years later, documents and photos of Eoan’s productions were found at the theatre. The photos, permits for performances, letters and programmes were organised into an archive which has been housed at the SU Music Department since 2008.Roos says many stories about the group and its members were undocumented for years, and numerous oral accounts of their activities appear in this book for the first time.The book is an oral history and includes extracts from 47 interviews which have been structured in a narrative around themes such as opera and ballet productions, and is complemented by photos and other archive material.The interviews were done mainly with former Eoan members, most of which sang in the group’s opera productions.A bittersweet storyDuring the 1950s, Eoan performed to mixed audiences. But Roos says the group’s activities became more restricted as apartheid intensified in the 1960s.“It had a major impact on their performances, but they kept going amid the political difficulties,” she says.Eventually apartheid legislation completely prohibited mixed audiences. To comply with these requirements, the group applied for permits to perform in the City Hall for mixed audiences from 1966 onwards.Roos says the group suffered a setback when they were forced to accept financial support from the apartheid government’s coloured affairs department, which caused their standing and support in the community to suffer.“They were forced into a tricky compromise,” she says. “They needed funding to put on performances but they also didn’t want to betray their community.”Despite these conditions, they remained successful and popular, and this was widely reflected in ticket sales and media coverage.Outstanding performances, against all oddsDuring their artistic peak from the 1950s to 1970s, the group often performed to packed houses in Cape Town’s best concert halls.Eoan performed the first full-length indigenous jazz ballet by a local composer for a South African ballet group. The Square by Stanley Glasser was about gang life in District Six.From 1956 until the late 1970s the group had an active amateur opera section which performed at arts festivals and annual opera seasons and toured throughout South Africa (1960 and 1965) and the United Kingdom (1975).In 1956 they performed Verdi’s La Traviata in the Cape Town City Hall, Eoan’s artistic home before apartheid legislation forced them to move to Athlone.By 1977 they had eleven operas in their repertoire: three by Verdi, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and La Bohème, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Bizet’s Carmen, Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci and Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana.Making a name overseasSome of Eoan’s members went on to build successful international careers.“Many of them went abroad, got bursaries and took their chance at better opportunities,” Roos says. “Some big names emerged from the group.”They were mostly dancers, but a handful of singers also made it overseas, despite not having access to good vocal training in South Africa.One of the group’s success stories is Vincent Hantam. According to Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, Hantam danced most of the principal roles with Scottish Ballet from 1975 to 1991, and has performed with many companies on the local and international stage.Tenor Joseph Gabriels was discovered by Joseph Manca, musical director of the Eoan Group.“He had an exceptional voice,” Roos says.He received no musical or vocal training while in South Africa, but in 1967 he secured a bursary from the Schneier family of Johannesburg to study in Milan.In 1969 he won the famous Verdi competition in Busseto. He made his debut in 1971 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Canio in I Pagliacci – the first South African to sing there.The Eoan Group stopped performing operas in 1977, but the company still exists today and they focus on dance productions.According to the team who compiled the book, the interviews with former Eoan members show how much people invested into the arts through the group, the extraordinary circumstances in which they had to operate, and the influential role that the group played in so many lives.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I hunted with a cat the other evening. I was after deer while the feline was stalking smaller mammals as I watched it undetected from my treestand above its perch. We shared a small swamp flanked by harvested bean and corn fields and accessed by narrow, overgrown fencerows connecting to wood lots. The farmer had left some standing corn and beans in the corners and around a wind-fallen ash tree, and the bonus grain and cover was a magnet to the local game, both feathered and furred.I know fellows who say they shoot feral cats when they see them in the field, taking care to target felines that are far from any farmhouse where they might double as pets. The argument is that the cats have gone native and, with no natural predators, ravage local game- and song-bird populations. You may have read about some recent studies done on the subject. I did, and have invited one feral cat expert on to my show next month to learn more about the issue. I’ll welcome Matt Clayton to Buckeye Sportsman on the Dec. 9 broadcast.I watched that cat as it crept up to the end of a branch off a fallen tree, settling in from that higher vantage point much the way I had in my stand 17 feet above. While I had the benefit of head to toe woodland camouflage to blend in with our shared surroundings, the feline had an unfortunate coloration: pure white but for a tail ringed like a raccoon and a pair of grown eye patches. You could see the stark-white predator working its way through the brush and stalks from clear across the field. The poor cat’s unnatural camo couldn’t be worse, I thought, then shuddered with a blast of the north wind that found its way down the back of my neck. That’s when it occurred to me that when the snow flies and living off the land is at its leanest, that cat’s coat will fit right in when it needs it the most. I wished the feline luck as it eventually padded off into a thick clump of timothy, and I sat shivering ‘til dark waiting for game that never showed. Waterfowl IDSpeaking of hunting, with waterfowl seasons in full swing across the state as Ohio’s duck and goose seasons begin, hunters are encouraged to familiarize themselves with waterfowl identification before heading out. Ohio waterfowl hunters frequently encounter a variety of species of birds when in the field and marsh, and some species of ducks, geese and swans may look similar.Some species, like the state-threatened trumpeter swans and occasionally migrating tundra swans, are protected and may be encountered. Although waterfowl hunters in Ohio rarely encounter snow geese, hunters should still be able to distinguish between swans and snow geese. With proper species identification and attention, there should be little confusion between the species. Trumpeter swan (threatened and protected species)• Mature birds have pure-white plumage (sometime stained heads) and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4 to 5 feet with a wingspan of 7 feet and weight of 17 to 28 pounds. Tundra swan (protected species)• Mature birds have pure- white plumage and young birds are more gray• Long necks relative to the body size• Length of 4.5 feet with a wingspan of 5.5 feet and weight of 8 to 23 pounds. Canada goose (legal game species)• Black-necked plumage with chin strap, black head, tan breast, brown back, long necks• Length of 2.5 to 3.5 feet with a wingspan of 4 to 5.5 feet, and weight of 6.5 to 20 pounds. Snow goose (legal game species)• White with black wing tips, short necks relative to the body size• Length of 2.5 feet with a wingspan of 4.5 feet and weight 3.5 to 7 pounds.For more information about waterfowl hunting in Ohio visit wildohio.gov.last_img read more


first_imgChhattisgarh Governor Balramji Dass Tandon, who was one of the founder members of the BJP’s parent organisation Jan Sangh, died after suffering a heart attack at a government hospital here on Tuesday, an official said. He was 90.Mr. Tandon breathed his last at the state-run Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Memorial Hospital where admitted this morning after he complained of uneasiness, Governor’s secretary, Surendra Kumar Jasiwal, told PTI. Mr. Tandon was kept in the hospital’s critical care unit in view of his serious condition, he added.The Governor suffered a heart attack, the hospital’s medical superintendent, Dr. Vivek Choudhary, said.Chief Minister Raman Singh, who visited the hospital earlier on getting the news of Mr. Tandon’s illness, announced a seven-day state mourning in view of the Governor’s demise.Independence Day will be observed in a traditional manner on Wednesday and there will be no award and cultural ceremonies, the CMO said in an official release.Mr. Tandon’s body will be taken to Raj Bhawan, where it will be kept for people to pay their respects at 5 pm. The body will be taken later to Mr. Tandon’s native place in Punjab.In his condolence message, the chief minister said that as Governor, Mr. Tandon offered his valuable services to Chhattisgarh for around four years. “He was like a father figure to me,” Mr. Singh said.Mr. Tandon had assumed the office of Governor in Chhattisgarh on July 2014.During his long political career, he served on various posts, including as deputy chief minister of Punjab.The six-time MLA was also jailed from 1975 to 1977 during Emergency.last_img read more


first_imgFor some strange reason football is synonymous with Bengal, although Goa and Kerala will claim equal suzerainty over it.In the early 1980s, I landed in Kolkata having grown up in Delhi. Imagine my horror, when I, a cricket junkie, found Kolkata was completely football crazy. The towering statue of Goshto Pal on the maidan, at the very intersection where the holy trinity of the megalopolis football craze converged – Mohun Bagan, East Bengal and Mohammedan Sporting – was nothing short of a pilgrimage for a neophyte like me. Having played football in school and a more bruising form later in the tea plantations, I too trooped to the makeshift stadia to make my tryst with the Kolkatan version of the beautiful game. And the passion on display was unbelievable – Shyam Thapa with his bicycle kick, the speedy Subhash Bhowmick, Subrata Bhattacharya tall and stately in defence, Gautam Sarkar, Mohd Habib, Mohd Nayeem and many more were part of a fabled pantheon worshipped by all of us.ArtistryBut this flirtation with football was to receive a rude jolt. Two Iranians landed in the city – Majid Bakshar and Jamshed Nassiri – and they opened up a whole new playing style. Nassiri was the poacher in the strike zone while Majid was the playmaker and ball passer. They made a fantastic combine, Majid with the flair, daredevilry and derring-do in the mid field, making the play for his compatriot Nassiri who struck home with dexterity and timing. The duo came from the province of Khuzestan and Majid even represented Iran in the 1978 World Cup played in Argentina. Both came to Aligarh Muslim University to pursue higher studies, but were spotted by talent scouts and recruited by East Bengal. Subsequently, they joined Mohammedan Sporting Football Club and Kolkatans flocked to the maidans.advertisementThe duo’s entry into the football cauldrons of Kolkata was a defining moment in Indian football. Football supporters were astonished at the artistry with which the two Iranians played the game in stark contrast to the the rest of the league. This first glimpse of real football was ‘revolutionary’ a term that may be politically incorrect given that Kolkata was then in the throes of Leftist rule. The end came swiftly as the more talented of the two – Majid – was debilitated by substance abuse. He returned to Iran, while Jamshed stayed on in his adopted city Kolkata.Jolt number two came with the advent of the Nehru Cup in Kolkata in 1982. My memory of that tourney was of the Uruguayan player who could throw the ball into the D such was the power of his throw. The robust playing style, the smart set pieces and the sheer agility of the Uruguayan players was a delight to watch as they vanquished China 2-0 to win the inaugural tournament. The Uruguayans had shown all too well, why the South American style was a killer app in world football. Two years later in 1984, Poland showed their hard tackling man-to-man marking style and defeated China. Kolkatans awoke with a start to the pace and speed on display in the Nehru Cup final.BrillianceThe final decapitating blow to the ‘art form’ practiced on Kolkata’s maidans came with the introduction of live television which beamed pictures of the 1986 football World Cup for the very first time. India’s love affair with the World Cup football tournament started in 1982, when for the first time the semi finals and final had been telecast live on Doordarshan. There was also deferred telecast of some of the earlier round matches. Brazil’s brilliance in that tournament, showcased by the attacking flair of Zico, Socrates, Falcao and Toninho Cerezo, won them many supporters. In the eighties, the majority of India supported Brazil.Over the years that changed. In 1986, for the very first time the entire World Cup was telecast live in India. With Mexico being the hosts the tournament gained notoriety. Almost overnight, pocket dynamo Diego Maradona became a star with fans all across the globe, and Kolkata being no exception. Whatever bad feelings Maradona may have created with his ‘Hand of God’ goal, he erased with the second, ensuring the quarter final between England and Argentina will never be forgotten.OutsidersThe goal, which was voted the “Goal of the Century” in 2002 on the FIFA website, saw Maradona running past five English players before scoring. With 20 minutes to go, the introduction of John Barnes as a substitute changed the tide of play in England’s favour, as he pinged in cross after cross into the Argentine penalty area and with just nine minutes left, England striker Gary Lineker got onto the end of one and scored. Lineker almost repeated six minutes later but was unable to reach the ball thanks to a timely block by Olarticoechea: 2-1 to Argentina remained the final score line.advertisementThe goals made Maradona a superstar. In the semi finals, he struck twice in the second half as Argentina beat Belgium 2-0. The final against Germany did not see the same magic but Maradona did enough to see his country home. With seven minutes remaining, a pass from him gave Jorge Burruchaga the chance to score the winner for Argentina.Argentina’s victory managed to turn Kolkata’s world upside down. Maradona’s staggering display of running, passing and goal scoring was viewed as a tour de force and since then, nothing has remained the same. Now, whenever Kolkata, Goa, Kerala or other urban agglomerates in India go gaga over football – be it EPL, Champions League or the World Cup – it reminds one of Begaane Shaadi Mein Abdullah Deewana. This iconic song from the Bollywood film Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hain, which literally means that you are dancing at some unknown person’s wedding, is something Indian fans have had to do, World Cup after World Cup, as Indian football has remained on skid row. Consigned to the rubbish heap of history, it will be some time before the nation can take part in the beautiful game, on the world stage.last_img read more


first_imgDuterte wants probe of SEA Games mess “We’re happy to have finally signed Jayjay Helterbrand into our roster. His overall experience, basketball IQ, and leadership would definitely provide a huge boost for our bid in the upcoming season,” said team manager Lou Abad.Helterbrand is turning 43 this year but Imus believes the Barangay Ginebra legend can still hang with the big boys at MPBL.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“He can still play. As you can see, he is still well-conditioned given that he has not stopped playing regularly in different leagues. He can still keep up with the young guys,” Abad said.The dazzling guard won six PBA championships all with Ginebra, a team he played for from 2000-2017. Helterbrand, a member of the PBA’s 40 Greatest Players, was also named Season MVP in 2009 and a Philippine Cup Finals MVP in 2007. He will team up with actor Gerald Anderson and former pro James Martinez to name a few at Imus.“We’re thrilled to have Jayjay Helterbrand and Gerald Anderson play side-by-side with each other. Their additions, along with the other players that we have, will surely bolster our squad,” said Abad.“It’s a big win not only for our team, but for the whole league as well as we try to help MPBL grow in terms of competition level and our fanbase.”Imus opens its campaign in the 2019 Lakandula Cup on Thursday against Caloocan City at Caloocan Sports Complex.ADVERTISEMENT Jayjay Helterbrand. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Two years after announcing his retirement in the PBA, Jayjay Helterbrand will be back on the court but for a different team and a different league.Helterbrand has signed with the Imus Bandera in the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League, the team announced Monday.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:41Helterbrand finds perfect time to call it a career00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too MOST READcenter_img ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Warriors’ Kevin Durant suffers Achilles injury in Game 5 LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more