first_imgDidi Sydown in a dance scene from Johann Strauss’ opera Die Fledermaus. Gerald Samaai, principal tenor for the Eoan Group, during a rehearsal at the Cape Town City Hall. May Abrahamse singing the role of Rosalinde in Eoan’s 1962 production of Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus.(Images: Cloete Breytenbach)MEDIA CONTACTS• Dr Hilde RoosEoan book project co-ordinator+27 21 808 2597Wilma den HartighA new book has been published to celebrate the 80th birthday of the Eoan Group, South Africa’s first grassroots amateur opera, ballet and drama organisation.Eoan – Our Story is the first book to tell the story of the relatively unknown group, which was established in 1933 by British immigrant Helen Southern-Holt, as a cultural and charity organisation in the former inner-city suburb of District Six in Cape Town.The publication is a project of the Documentation Centre for Music (Domus) at Stellenbosch University (SU). It was compiled by the Eoan History Project, with Dr Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller as editors.The Eoan Group played an important role in promoting the performance of classical music in South Africa, developing artistic talent and preserving the vibrant cultural heritage of District Six.This historic area is known for the forced removal of about 60 000 of its residents during the 1970s by the apartheid regime.The name Eoan comes from the Greek word ‘Eos’, the goddess of the dawn. In Greek mythology she is personified as the one who brings the hope of a new day. The group’s founder chose this name as it referred to her desire to bring hope and new opportunities to the community of District Six.Despite working under the constraints of apartheid, the organisation provided a platform where gifted actors, musicians and dancers could express their life’s calling.“Their story is inspirational. It is time to celebrate their memory,” says Roos.For many people who had talent, this was their only chance.“This is why the organisation was so important,” she says. “It gave people an opportunity to develop their talent and perform, even if these were limited opportunities.“There is no other group like this.”Important memories preserved in printThrough the book the Eoan History Project hopes to preserve the organisation’s history for future generations.The publication tells the story of Eoan’s establishment, but also shows the impact of the apartheid government’s racial policies on South African communities.“What is extraordinary about this group is that there is just about no other example in the country where the evolution of a cultural group and the development of the apartheid regime are so closely linked,” Roos says.When the Eoan Group started, their headquarters were situated in District Six and 15 branches were established throughout the Cape Peninsula by the mid-1950s. They offered a wide range of activities that included ballet, folk dance, speech, drama, singing, painting and sewing.After the destruction of District Six, the group moved to their new premises, the Joseph Stone Theatre in Athlone.Years later, documents and photos of Eoan’s productions were found at the theatre. The photos, permits for performances, letters and programmes were organised into an archive which has been housed at the SU Music Department since 2008.Roos says many stories about the group and its members were undocumented for years, and numerous oral accounts of their activities appear in this book for the first time.The book is an oral history and includes extracts from 47 interviews which have been structured in a narrative around themes such as opera and ballet productions, and is complemented by photos and other archive material.The interviews were done mainly with former Eoan members, most of which sang in the group’s opera productions.A bittersweet storyDuring the 1950s, Eoan performed to mixed audiences. But Roos says the group’s activities became more restricted as apartheid intensified in the 1960s.“It had a major impact on their performances, but they kept going amid the political difficulties,” she says.Eventually apartheid legislation completely prohibited mixed audiences. To comply with these requirements, the group applied for permits to perform in the City Hall for mixed audiences from 1966 onwards.Roos says the group suffered a setback when they were forced to accept financial support from the apartheid government’s coloured affairs department, which caused their standing and support in the community to suffer.“They were forced into a tricky compromise,” she says. “They needed funding to put on performances but they also didn’t want to betray their community.”Despite these conditions, they remained successful and popular, and this was widely reflected in ticket sales and media coverage.Outstanding performances, against all oddsDuring their artistic peak from the 1950s to 1970s, the group often performed to packed houses in Cape Town’s best concert halls.Eoan performed the first full-length indigenous jazz ballet by a local composer for a South African ballet group. The Square by Stanley Glasser was about gang life in District Six.From 1956 until the late 1970s the group had an active amateur opera section which performed at arts festivals and annual opera seasons and toured throughout South Africa (1960 and 1965) and the United Kingdom (1975).In 1956 they performed Verdi’s La Traviata in the Cape Town City Hall, Eoan’s artistic home before apartheid legislation forced them to move to Athlone.By 1977 they had eleven operas in their repertoire: three by Verdi, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and La Bohème, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Bizet’s Carmen, Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci and Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana.Making a name overseasSome of Eoan’s members went on to build successful international careers.“Many of them went abroad, got bursaries and took their chance at better opportunities,” Roos says. “Some big names emerged from the group.”They were mostly dancers, but a handful of singers also made it overseas, despite not having access to good vocal training in South Africa.One of the group’s success stories is Vincent Hantam. According to Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, Hantam danced most of the principal roles with Scottish Ballet from 1975 to 1991, and has performed with many companies on the local and international stage.Tenor Joseph Gabriels was discovered by Joseph Manca, musical director of the Eoan Group.“He had an exceptional voice,” Roos says.He received no musical or vocal training while in South Africa, but in 1967 he secured a bursary from the Schneier family of Johannesburg to study in Milan.In 1969 he won the famous Verdi competition in Busseto. He made his debut in 1971 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Canio in I Pagliacci – the first South African to sing there.The Eoan Group stopped performing operas in 1977, but the company still exists today and they focus on dance productions.According to the team who compiled the book, the interviews with former Eoan members show how much people invested into the arts through the group, the extraordinary circumstances in which they had to operate, and the influential role that the group played in so many lives.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Scott Metzger, Pickaway Co.We are pretty dry. After having 10.6 inches of rain in July and almost perfect conditions, we’ve turned off dry in August. You see a lot of crops on the clay knobs and drier ground getting stressed and starting to turn. We have had a couple of inches in August right her at the shop, but a mile south we’ve had about six-tenths in the last two weeks and around Frankfurt it is more like three-tenths. There is rain in the forecast and it would be appreciated.Our early corn is starting to black layer. I would say that within 10 days there will be some corn shelled in Pickaway County. Our stuff is still pretty green yet so it will ready to harvest around Farm Science Review. I thought I was seeing some N loss with corn firing up, but with the GDUs we’ve had it is time for that early corn to start turning. Our later planted corn is starting to dent. I could see us having all of the early corn shelled before we start beans.I am really surprised at the diseases that came in late. It is far enough along that I don’t think they will hurt anything but I have been surprised at the disease levels in some fields I’ve been walking. Other fields, though, are really pretty clean.We don’t have a bumper crop but we do have pretty good corn yields. In the early corn it seems like there is a lot of variability. You don’t see that in the later corn where there is more consistent girth and maybe less length. Overall I think we’ll be above average on the corn.I think the dry weather has taken the top end off the later beans. I have seen 50 to 60 and occasionally 70 pods per plant. We have some very tall beans and they are podded pretty decent, but tall beans usually scare me. They look pretty but don’t usually yield well. The double-crops are coming along. They would really benefit from a rain. They are in R3 and the potential is there. We need some rain and not an early frost.We’re getting the equipment, bins and grain dryer ready and I am guessing we’ll get to know the propane guy on a first-name basis this year.For the rest of this week’s reports, click here.last_img read more


first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#start#startups dana oshiro In a few weeks, moviegoers will flock to Philip Seymour Hoffman’s latest rock ensemble flick Pirate Radio. A fictional period comedy about an illegal station in the North Sea, the film embodies the same anti-authoritarian sentiments that Gen X and Y audiences have grown to love. Jelli.net, a crowdsourced radio station with a Web-based interface, has found a way to democratize sound waves and captivate that same 18-35-year-old audience. The Bay Area company launched in June, allowing users to access a Digg-like interface and vote up or down real time on FM radio during CBS’ Live 105 KITS’ Sunday programming. As of this evening, the company has penned a national deal with 450 Triton Digital Media radio stations and a distribution deal with Australian broadcaster Austereo. Says Jelli’s CEO Mike Dougherty, “What makes this different than request radio is that while program directors set up the broadcast sandbox, there is no actual middle man between a request and radio play.” According to Dougherty, Jelli’s voting platform directly informs programming servers sitting at the radio station’s transmission tower. In other words, if the community decides to vote up a War of the Worlds-style radio scenario, it’s entirely possible to do so. As of today, the community now has access to a nationwide network of stations, and in a few months time, they’ll also have access to stations in Perth, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Melbourne. Rather than kowtowing to advertisers and labels, programming is directly affected by the likes and dislikes of the Jelli community. According to Dougherty, on average two tracks are voted off the air per hour. Just as music fans vote their favorite songs onto the radio, they can also “bomb” them down into the lower echelons of Jelli’s charts. In some cases, waring factions of fans have rallied to take over the airwaves, and in other cases programming revolves around a specific theme. Jelli’s chat feature makes it possible to sway the music mob. In the past, community music sites have struggled to increase their catalogs because of the balancing act they had to maintain between freemium music models and major label licensing fees. With Jelli, the community gets the music they want via streaming web service or traditional radio, and stations continue to tackle the ad placement and legal work. With radio transmission towers constantly connected to the cloud, Dougherty believes that there is a world of opportunity to pull in Facebook applications, mobile interfaces and additional levels of a web-based feedback loops. For developers, stations and advertisers, this cloud-based data means the difference between waiting on a quarterly Arbitron radio rating and gaining access to demographic data on a weekly (and soon daily) basis. Instead of changing the radio station, Jelli empowers users to simply change the song. To check out the service, visit Jelli.net. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more


first_img The official said the Home Ministry had given the clearance to deploy the extra seven CRPF battalions (each battalion comprises around 1,000 personnel) last year. “They couldn’t be deployed last year and it has been decided to move them to Chhattisgarh on an immediate basis. Most were on election duty. As they set up camps in the interior pockets and increase their presence, it will be difficult for Maoists to escape using these routes,” he said.The action by security forces at the Madhya Pradesh-Maharashra-Chhattisgarh trijunction, where Maoists were trying to raise a new armed group, was also discussed at the meeting.In 2017, after security forces came to know of a new unit called the “Vistara platoon” that was trying to gain a foothold at the trijunction, extra personnel were rushed to the area. The Ministry has asked the States about the steps taken to reduce the number of casualties due to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and measures to check the flow of funds to Maoist groups. Mr. Gauba asked the Maoist-affected States to have more inter-State operations and joint operations.The meeting was attended by the Chief Secretaries and Directors-General of Police of Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Maharashtra, Bihar, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Telengana and Madhya Pradesh. Representatives of the CRPF, the BSF and the ITBP were also present. Nearly 7,000 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel are to be deployed in the inaccessible areas of Abujhmad in south Chhattisgarh to fill the “security vacuum” and plug the gaps through which Maoists escape when operations are launched, a senior government official said.The Union Home Ministry has asked the States to continue the offensive against “urban activities of CPI (Maoists) and its front organisations”, according to a note accessed by The Hindu.Last year, 10 persons, including human rights lawyer Sudha Bhardwaj, were arrested by the Maharashtra police for allegedly being associated with Maoists, a charge denied by them.This year, 60 operations have been conducted, in which 34 Maoists and 17 security personnel were killed in Chhattisgarh, the worst-affected State. Since 2016, as many as 635 operations have been launched in the State, where 370 Maoists and 179 security personnel were killed.The Abujhmad forests are not on the revenue map and the dense jungles are used by Maoists as their hideouts. It was here in February 2017 that the Central Committee, the top decision-making body of the Maoists, met and decided to pick a new leader, Basavaraju, replacing Muppala Lakshman Rao, alias Ganapathi.Review meetingUnion Home Secretary Rajiv Gauba convened a meeting of the States affected by Left-wing extremism (LWE) last week where the redeployment of CRPF personnel and other issues were discussed. This was the first such review done after Amit Shah took charge as Home Minister in the second term of the Narendra Modi government. The extra personnel would be deployed in the interior of Bijapur and Sukma districts also. At present, around 44,000 Central forces are deployed in the State other than the State police.last_img read more