first_imgMar 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – State and federal public health officials are managing two large Salmonella outbreaks, one linked to contaminated groundwater that has sickened as many as 216 people in Alamosa, Colo., and another that is apparently connected to imported Honduran cantaloupe and involves 59 illnesses in 16 states and Canada.Salmonella in Colorado waterAfter state health officials confirmed dozens of Salmonella infections in Alamosa area residents, authorities tested the municipal water supply and found it was contaminated with bacteria, according to a Mar 21 emergency declaration from Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter.Today the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed that the pathogen was Salmonella, according to a statement from David Svaldi, president of Adams State College in Alamosa. The town of about 8,700 people is in south-central Colorado in the San Luis Valley, an area known for growing cool-weather crops.Media reports and official statements have not specified which Salmonella strain caused the illnesses.Area residents have been under a bottled-water advisory since Mar 19, according to a statement from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). According to an update on the Alamosa County Web site, authorities will begin a three-step process to clean up the municipal water system tomorrow. Residents have been advised that the bottled-water advisory may be in effect for up to 2 weeks.The CDPHE confirmed the first Salmonella infection on Mar 14, according to Ritter’s emergency declaration. As of yesterday, 216 cases of salmonellosis had been reported in Alamosa, of which 68 were confirmed by laboratory tests, according to the statement from Svaldi. Twelve Adams State students have reported symptoms, but laboratory tests have not yet confirmed the infections. Nine people have been hospitalized; no deaths have been reported.Authorities have not said how they think the water became contaminated with Salmonella. Ken Carlson, an environmental engineering professor from Colorado State University, said Alamosa’s water comes from five deep wells and is untreated, the Denver Post reported on Mar 21. More than half of the US drinking water supply consists of untreated groundwater, he told the Post, adding that groundwater typically never comes in contact with possibly contaminated surface water before reaching consumers.”Generally that’s been a good assumption. There have been very few outbreaks in these systems,” Carlson told the Post.Local residents are speculating that water could have been contaminated by sabotage or by an accident at a new water treatment plant that is under construction, according to the Post report.Michael Beach, a waterborne diseases specialist with the CDC, said that in the past 20 years there have been only five reported instances of Salmonella contamination in municipal water, according to the Post. He said one case involved contaminated groundwater, two were linked to water-distribution system breaches, and two involved disinfection problems. Since 1971, none of the 15 recorded cases of Salmonella contamination in city water supplies were caused by sabotage, Carlson told the Post.FDA, CDC investigate cantaloupeMeanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Mar 22 warned consumers not to eat cantaloupe from Honduran grower Agropecuaria Montelibano and ordered FDA field offices to detain all of the company’s cantaloupe shipments. The FDA said in a press release that between Jan 18 and Mar 5 it had received reports of 50 Salmonella cases in 16 states, along with 9 illnesses in Canada, linked through case-control studies to the consumption of Honduran cantaloupe.According to a Mar 22 statement from the CDC, the patients were found to have the same genetic fingerprint of Salmonella Litchfield. Patients’ ages range from under 1 year to 93 years. At least 14 patients have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported.The FDA’s traceback investigation indicated that cantaloupes consumed by patients with the outbreak strain were grown in Honduras, according to the CDC statement. Government statements did not make clear how the outbreak was linked to Agropecuaria Montelibano specifically. The FDA has advised US grocers, food service operators, and produce processors to remove the company’s products from their stocks; however, the CDC said the products may still be in grocery stores or consumers’ homes.Consumers who have cantaloupes in their homes can check with the markets where they purchased the product to see if the fruit came from the implicated Honduran grower, the FDA said. The CDC said consumers who have the potentially contaminated cantaloupe in their homes should throw the product away.See also:Mar 24 statement from Adams State College President David Svaldihttp://www.adams.edu/news/mar0822/mar0822.phpMar 22 FDA news release on cantaloupe contaminationhttp://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2008/NEW01808.html CDC statement on Salmonella outbreak linked to cantaloupehttp://www.cdc.gov/Salmonella/litchfield/last_img read more


first_img A superb round of 69, containing eight birdies, saw Billy Watson secure the Junior County Champions title for Hampshire over the Hotchkin Course at Woodhall Spa, ending a two-year domination by Lincolnshire golfers.His 36-hole aggregate of 142, four under par, was five strokes ahead of runner-up, Gian-Marco Petrozzi from Staffordshire, his playing partner, and six clear of Essex champion Taylor Carter.“Although I won the Hampshire Boys Championship, this is my biggest victory as it is a national title,” said Watson. “It is a big achievement for me and a great boost. It also gets me automatic entry into next year’s Brabazon Trophy and hopefully on to better things.”Watson (image © Leaderboard Photography), the 18-year-old son of former European Tour professional Scott Watson, started his second round one shot off the lead held by Lincolnshire’s Sam Done. But he was soon setting a hot pace.“I was fighting a left pull on my long irons this morning so before I went out this afternoon I spent some time in the net with my dad and he put me right,” added Watson.“This afternoon was fun. I started well with a birdie at the first from six feet and I missed chances at the next two holes. But I birdied the sixth and bogeyed the seventh to be out in 36 but I had six birdies on the back nine. “This win will take a while to sink in. It was good to have dad on the bag, not necessarily for tips but for his support.”While most of the field were struggling with the Hotchkin’s tough challenge, Watson, who stands 6ft 6ins, made it look easy. He had birdies at the tenth, 11th, 13th, 14th, 16th and 18th while bogeys at 12 and 15, both to three putts, kept him on an even keel.He and Petrozzi were in the last group on the course and the Staffordshire youngster also beat the par with his five-birdie 71 for 147.Carter, who won all six of his games for Essex in the recent English Boys County Championship, added a level-par 73 to his opening 75 for third place on 148.“I started poorly with a double bogey at the second after getting a bad lie in a bunker,” said the 18 year old from Rochford. “But I played O.K. but didn’t hole a thing. I had a lot of chances but couldn’t get the ball to drop. But I finished well with an eagle at 18, hitting my hybrid to eight feet.”Although Cheshire boy champion Max Rogers finished down the field he had the satisfaction of securing his first ever hole-in-one. It came at the 209-yard eighth hole when he sank his five iron tee shot.“I didn’t see the ball go in but the pitch mark was about ten feet in front of the hole so I assume it rolled in from there,” said the 17 year old from the Astbury club. “I’ve never had an ace before and I needed it today. It made up for a bogey at that hole this morning. 13 Sep 2014 Victory proves elementary for eight-birdie Watson last_img read more


first_imgBy Jay Cook |HOLMDEL – An accord struck last year by Holmdel’s all-Republican governing body calls for an annual rotation of its elected officials to govern from the mayor’s seat, allowing for a fresh approach on the best way to manage the 18-square-mile town.In the 2018 calendar year, the mayoral office has shifted to Thomas Critelli.A five-year committeeman and first-time mayor, Critelli thanked his Republican counterparts both sitting beside him and in the audience for the opportunity to serve as Holmdel mayor for the next 365 days. Newly sworn-in committeeman Rocco Pascucci was unanimously voted in as the deputy mayor for 2018. Former mayor Greg Buontempo was also sworn in as a committeeman for his third term.“During last year’s reorganization, we discussed rotating the mayor’s seat each year, which was something this committee had not done for some time,” Critelli said, moments after being sworn in by former Holmdel mayor and Assemblywoman-elect Serena DiMaso. “I’d like to extend a special thank you to Mayor Greg Buontempo for allowing us to honor that commitment.”After his first mayoral speech, Critelli told The Two River Times that the agreement to elect a different mayor every year from within the unified governing body will benefit Holmdel.“It’s more about getting fresh ideas,” Critelli said, while also adding he’ll still collaborate with the four members on the township committee. “I think the public thought we were getting a little stale and maybe not moving as rapidly as we needed to – a little change is all.”Critelli is a 27-year Holmdel resident who owns three small businesses with his wife, Mary, in northern New Jersey. Critelli is a certified public accountant and is the president and founder of Danitom Development, a real estate development company. He also owns a manufacturing company and a convenience store, he said.Critelli believes that background and experience can only benefit Holmdel as he takes over the mayor’s seat.“I like to see things get done, not bureaucratically slow things down. The town can be bureaucratic in its thinking because of some of the people that have been here for long periods of time who like to do things at their pace,” he said. “We hope to be able to kick-start that a little bit and get things moving, sort of like a small business.”In his address to residents in attendance, the new mayor said there’s much to look forward to “in a truly exciting time in Holmdel township.”Critelli said the governing body will focus on continuing the relationship with Somerset Development, owners of the 473-acre Bell Works site just a mile from town hall; keep the municipal tax rate flat for residents; look to expand recreational activities for all residents; and engage in “aggressively rebuilding” faulty roads and infrastructure in town.Finding more recreational opportunities for Holmdel residents has been a recent goal for the governing body, Critelli said. The township committee authorized the creation of an ad hoc recreational committee early last year; a report compiled by the committee and a consultant will be provided to residents by the end of the month, he said.“We’re going to release that information and hopefully be able to exercise and move on some sort of aggressive improvements at the recommendations of the committee,” he said.Critelli also spoke about improving emergency service communications in the township. He said Police Chief John Mioduszewski was inquiring about new systems for his officers.Also on tap for 2018 will be a decision regarding Holmdel’s affordable housing obligations. The township will have a fairness hearing before a Superior Court judge in Freehold later this year with the Fair Share Housing Center, a group which litigates in favor of low-income housing throughout the state. Critelli declined to go into detail considering the pending litigation, but did say, “I expect it to be resolved sooner rather than later.”Since it is his first term as mayor, Critelli told residents he’d rely upon his current and former colleagues for guidance if needed. Committeemen Greg Buontempo and Eric Hinds are both former mayors, as are DiMaso and Monmouth County Freeholder-elect Pat Impreveduto, last year’s deputy mayor in Holmdel.“There’s an enormous amount of knowledge from the mayors that have come before me,” Critelli said. “I don’t like to go into anything blind, so I can rely on them for the right way to approach something.”This article was first published in the Jan. 4-11, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more