first_imgBy Julian GuyverLONDON, England (AFP) – West Indies go into today’s third and deciding Test at Lord’s with the chance to complete a dramatic turnaround and win their first series in England in almost 30 years.The Caribbean side last triumphed in England in 1988 when a team boasting a clutch of all-time greats including Gordon Greenidge, Viv Richards, Malcolm Marshall and Curtly Ambrose romped to a 4-0 win.The West Indies dominated Test cricket for two decades but their decline has been precipitous and they are currently languishing at eighth in the world rankings, with just Bangladesh and Zimbabwe below them.Having dusted down the “obituaries” after the series opener at Edgbaston — when the visitors slumped to a defeat by an innings and 209 runs – few pundits gave Jason Holder’s novice West Indies side any chance of a revival in Leeds.Yet, despite being set more than 300 to win in the fourth innings following a declaration by England captain Joe Root, the tourists showed true grit to win by five wickets.Shai Hope became the first batsman in history to score hundreds in both innings of a match at Headingley, putting his side in a strong position with 147 before following up his maiden Test century with a match-clinching 118 not out in the second innings.After the fourth day of a match of fluctuating fortunes, ex-England captain Nasser Hussain, a former Essex team-mate of West Indies coach Stuart Law, said the tourists were flagging because the physical demands of a Test match were greater than that of Twenty20 cricket.A satisfied Law said,: “People make assumptions all the time.”“But he (Hussain) doesn’t know the characters that are inside that dressing room – he doesn’t even know me and I played with him at Essex,” the former Australia batsman added.“Not a lot of these players play T20 cricket anyway. I think it was great we sent him a big humble pie to go and chomp on in the commentary box.”England even took the risk of dropping in-form seamer Toby Roland-Jones, whose three Tests this season have yielded 14 wickets, for the Headingley Test, bringing in Chris Woakes for his first Test of the home campaign after injury, seemingly to get some overs under his belt ahead of the upcoming Ashes tour of Australia.The home side, however, have recalled Roland-Jones on his Middlesex home ground and dropped Woakes in the only change to their side.“Home conditions, he (Roland-Jones) obviously knows the surfaces and is bowling very well at the moment,” Root told reporters at Lord’s yesterday after announcing his team.“It’s obviously very difficult to leave somebody like Chris out; he’s been a consistent performer in Test cricket for England.“But this is a team I think is going to win this week,” star batsman Root added.England still have doubts about their problem top-order batting positions with number three Tom Westley under most scrutiny after a run of single-figure scores.“That extra pressure will find out a bit more about people’s character and things like that so it should be an exciting week,” said England spearhead James Anderson.Having gone wicketless on the last day in Leeds, Anderson arrives at Lord’s still three away from becoming the first England bowler to take 500 Test wickets.“To be honest, I do try to put it to the back of my mind,” Anderson said.“We desperately need to win this Test match to win the series so I’m going to be focused completely on doing my job for the team when we get out there.”last_img read more


first_imgAs photos and stories from Haiti continue to catch the public eye, students and professors on campus have undertaken various efforts to provide whatever help they can.Much of Haiti has been ravaged and hundreds of thousands left dead by the large-scale earthquake that struck last week. To honor those lost and to help those in need of aid, the USC Office of Religious Life hosted a vigil Tuesday and the Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism hosted a CrisisCamp volunteer session Sunday.Photo courtesy of The Los Angeles TimesStudents and community members came together Tuesday at the interfaith vigil.“The event was all about healing and grief, but it’s also about learning, and getting background,” said Rev. Jim Burklo. “Education is a big part of it; we want to get people interested in the history of the country as well as a spiritual response.”The vigil began with Varun Soni, the dean for the Office of Religious Life, who gave the audience of about 25 a brief recap of what occurred in Haiti and of the earthquake’s destruction and its effects.“Today we come together to support the people of Haiti and to support each other,” Soni said in his opening speech. “Today we bring together the spiritual and scholarly resources of our university in order to raise money and awareness for Haiti.”Allyson Salinger Ferrante, a graduate student who is working on her dissertation on Caribbean literature, followed with a poem by René Dépestre titled Ballad of a Little Lamp.“As students and members of a privileged community who have access to education among other basic things like food, clothes and shelter, we may feel that we are too small to really effect any change, but that’s not true,” Ferrante said. “Every dollar counts and the spread of information counts, and that doesn’t cost anything.”Students who attended the event said they felt it was important to show support as a group.“I think its important to unite our campus because a lot of us know people whose family members have been affected,” said Jillian Angeline, a sophomore majoring in broadcast journalism. “As the Haitian community is uniting, the students on campus should as well.”Erica Edwards, a senior majoring in English who attended the event, said she hopes other students understand what happened.“It’s important to take some time to reflect on Haiti, it’s really important to look at the larger picture and to see the world and see life globally as opposed to just our own life,” said Edwards. “It is important to make time for those who are in need. One day it could be us.”Beyond the vigil, faculty and community members met Sunday to use their technological skills to help the relief effort as part of CrisisCamp Haiti, a program hosted by Annenberg.More than 40 volunteers worked on various projects, including an open street map of Haiti and a family locator system. Others helped by translating messages into French and Haitian Creole.“The idea was just to get people together and see what we can do,” said Andrew Lih, the Annenberg faculty member who organized the event in Los Angeles. “It’s tough to figure out the impact of what is going on here in Haiti, but at least we can use the technology to help.”Lih said he is trying to organize another event but emphasized that volunteers should also undertake crisis-relief projects on their own.“Events like this are really time sensitive, and some people say that even waiting a week to meet is too late,” Lih said.last_img read more