first_imgThe ball squirted free and Schneider capitalized for a 1-0 lead in the 50th minute. “I felt like we were hanging on,” Mocabee said. “I thought the few chances we did get were on counters. I felt like they were strong and they were wearing on us.” McDonald, on a rare 1-on-1 situation near the goal, sent a shot to the corner that South Hills goalie Danielle Steward dove for but couldn’t get. It appeared as though the game would reach overtime, but a brief volley around the Huskies’ goal produced a chance for Gilbert to send a header over Stewart, who was rendered defenseless on the play by having to gamble by coming out. McDonald scored two minutes later by breaking a 1-on-2 dilemma and sent a rocket that hit the goal post, went 2 feet inside the goal and bounced out. COVINA – Freshman Nicole Gilbert scored on a header in the 78th minute and Pepperdine-bound Kylie McDonald added an insurance goal two minutes later to lift Westlake High School’s girls soccer team to a 3-1 win over host South Hills on Tuesday in the second round of the CIF-Southern Section Division II playoffs. The loss was a cruel finish to a stellar season for the Huskies, which included the team handing area power Walnut its first San Antonio League loss en route to a share of the league title. South Hills finished 19-5. “I just told them after the game was over how proud I was of them,” South Hills coach Scott Mocabee said. “This game isn’t going to take away what they accomplished this season, beating Walnut and beating Canyon (in the first round).” South Hills broke a scoreless tie at halftime when Tiffany Schneider took advantage of an error by Westlake goalie Jackie Jacobsen, who came out from the goal for a loose ball. center_img aram.tolegian@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2233 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more


first_imgSAN FRANCISCO–Injuries have robbed the Giants of several key contributors throughout the season, but Joe Panik is the first position player to be sent to the disabled list for two separate ailments.Manager Bruce Bochy said Panik was diagnosed with a “mild-to-moderate” groin strain while trainer Dave Groeschner said the injury could leave the club without one of its starting infielders for the next three weeks.Panik arrived in the clubhouse Tuesday and said he’s still sore after injuring …last_img read more


first_imgMike Nicol’s crime novel Killer Countryhas received positive reviews.(Image: Mike Nicol) Author Margie Orford on the cover ofthe special crime issue of WordsEtc.(Image: Margie Orford)MEDIA CONTACTS • Helen HolyoakeBookEx+27 11 462 2302Chris ThurmanSouth Africans like to talk about crime. It creeps into conversations at dinner parties, in shebeens, on radio talk shows and in parliament.Perhaps it was only a matter of time, then, until all that talking fostered creative writing and reading – not just in newspaper and magazine articles or online, but in books. South Africa’s publishers, booksellers and literary communities are all in a stir over “crime lit”.Literary websites like Book SA and LitNet are dedicating an increasing proportion of their content to so-called krimis. Earlier this year, literary journal WordsEtc brought out a special issue on the phenomenon, guest edited by Joanne Hichens, herself a crime writer. The publication featured interviews with, among others, the local queen of crime fiction, Margie Orford.Most recently, the inaugural BookEx book fair in Johannesburg hosted CrimeWrite, the first festival of its kind in the country. Organiser Mike Nicol expressed some disappointment at the turnout, but affirmed nonetheless that the writers participating showed “they can deliver the goods … there is a great marketing opportunity here.”“Pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”Nicol, a self-confessed krimihead, is the doyen of the South African crime writing scene and its most ardent promoter. This is quite something for a man who used to feel only disdain for the genre.He describes his crime novels as “pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”, and is unashamed about the formulaic requirements of much popular writing – in particular, he is critical of “academics who haven’t yet got their heads around the idea that commercial fiction has a completely legitimate place in any society’s literary life”.In penning these words, Nicol no doubt had in mind a review of his book Killer Country by literary scholar Leon de Kock of Stellenbosch University. The debate amongst members of the Book SA community following this review demonstrated the false perception that professional academics look down from their ivory towers on popular books, their readers and their writers.De Kock’s review in fact praises Nicol’s writing, but poses some important questions nonetheless: what does it mean for a former writer of serious literary works to turn his hand to genre fiction? Is this a process of dumbing-down in order to gain as wide a readership as possible? And if so, what assumptions are being made about readers? More specifically, why is it that so many writers have, like Nicol, chosen to focus their careers on crime writing?These are important questions, particularly in a country such as South Africa. There are ethical implications to representing the phenomenon of crime in the pages of a book – not least because writing for entertainment and writing for edification are by no means mutually inclusive.This dilemma is linked to the problem of definition. What is crime writing? After all, you would be hard pressed to identify any South African book (including those by our Nobel Prize-winners) in which transgression of the law is not a central theme. As such, crime has always been pervasive in South African literature.A useful distinction can, however, be made between fiction and non-fiction crime writing. One of the panel discussions at the CrimeWrite festival included well-known non-fiction authors Peter Harris, Antony Altbeker, Martin Welz and Chris Marnewick – all of whom have written about true crime in earnest engagements with South Africa’s crime epidemic. For the most part, however, when people refer to crime writing they mean what Nicol himself calls “schlock fiction”. This is, more or less, writing according to a set of conventions already established by authors from countries where crime is not as serious a social problem as it is here.Vicarious gratificationThose who defend crime fiction in South Africa could present a moral case if they wished to: in a country where, all too often, justice does not take its course, krimis offer a kind of vicarious gratification. As Nicol admits, crime novels tend to conclude with the triumph of moral justice, if not of the justice system: they appeal to a reader’s “innate desire to have good stomp all over evil”.But it’s not that simple. Many crime novels, in true realist form, reject neat endings in which the goodies beat the baddies; moreover, it’s not always that easy to tell the good guys from the bad guys.“One of the things that attracted me to crime fiction,” adds Nicol, “is the moral ambiguity it creates. There are no angels.”Likewise, crime writers do not claim any moral high ground for themselves. That WordsEtc cover image of Margie Orford is suitably ambiguous: looking sombre as she pulls on a white glove, Orford could either be a detective about to get to work or a murderer about to commit a heinous crime.Quoting Raymond Chandler’s observation that “crime fiction is a parody of itself, as tongue-in-cheek as it gets”, Nicol suggests that krimis mock “the author, the novel and the reader. It’s a game. Crime fiction confronts serious social issues but simultaneously says, don’t take me seriously.”An entertaining reading experienceIndeed, there seems to be consensus among South Africa’s crime writers that their vocation is fun – just as they want the reading experience to be entertaining. Yet the awkward question remains: what happens when writing and reading pleasure involves voyeuristic violence? There are no clear answers.A glance at the promotion tables in local book retailers provides evidence enough that South African readers are not reluctant to buy crime fiction from international authors such as Stieg Larsson and Ruth Rendell. This would suggest that most consumers see krimis as a form of escapism, which may be one reason why they avoid locally-produced crime lit: it is simply too close to the bone.But the major reason is, unfortunately, that South Africans are generally still hesitant to spend their time and money on works by South African authors.As Nicol laments, “Often we need to be ratified by overseas publication before local readers will buy our books.”This trend is slowly being reversed, and more and more South African books are on the shelves. If South African crime writing does prove to be as popular as is hoped by local practitioners of the craft – from veterans such as Deon Meyer and Wessel Ebersohn to newcomers like Sara Lotz and Sifiso Mzobe – then it may well help to grow a reading culture across the country.The last word can be left to Nicol: “It’s not so much a matter of dumbing-down as a new kind of book being written. The high literature will remain but readers now have more choice when it comes to buying local fiction. The trick is to make them aware of that choice.”last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Scott Metzger, Pickaway Co.We are pretty dry. After having 10.6 inches of rain in July and almost perfect conditions, we’ve turned off dry in August. You see a lot of crops on the clay knobs and drier ground getting stressed and starting to turn. We have had a couple of inches in August right her at the shop, but a mile south we’ve had about six-tenths in the last two weeks and around Frankfurt it is more like three-tenths. There is rain in the forecast and it would be appreciated.Our early corn is starting to black layer. I would say that within 10 days there will be some corn shelled in Pickaway County. Our stuff is still pretty green yet so it will ready to harvest around Farm Science Review. I thought I was seeing some N loss with corn firing up, but with the GDUs we’ve had it is time for that early corn to start turning. Our later planted corn is starting to dent. I could see us having all of the early corn shelled before we start beans.I am really surprised at the diseases that came in late. It is far enough along that I don’t think they will hurt anything but I have been surprised at the disease levels in some fields I’ve been walking. Other fields, though, are really pretty clean.We don’t have a bumper crop but we do have pretty good corn yields. In the early corn it seems like there is a lot of variability. You don’t see that in the later corn where there is more consistent girth and maybe less length. Overall I think we’ll be above average on the corn.I think the dry weather has taken the top end off the later beans. I have seen 50 to 60 and occasionally 70 pods per plant. We have some very tall beans and they are podded pretty decent, but tall beans usually scare me. They look pretty but don’t usually yield well. The double-crops are coming along. They would really benefit from a rain. They are in R3 and the potential is there. We need some rain and not an early frost.We’re getting the equipment, bins and grain dryer ready and I am guessing we’ll get to know the propane guy on a first-name basis this year.For the rest of this week’s reports, click here.last_img read more


first_imgGagarin nearly died when the rockets didn’t disengage from his capsule after re-entry, making the heat almost fatal.Fifty years ago, a calm, young madman allowed himself to be strapped inside what was most likely to be his metal coffin. As he lay back and had the belts fitted around him, he smiled for the still and movie cameras. Then, once the lid shut on the little tube, the young man became just a voice.’Everything alright?’ They asked him from the outside. ‘ Everything is fine! Let’s go!’ he replied cheerfully. And the people outside pushed the button.LeapThe closest most of us over forty will ever come to feeling the thrust of the huge rockets pushing up is when we are taking off in a small airliner, i.e not very close. The rockets catapulted the young man and his steel container right up against the ceiling of our atmosphere and through it out into space. Reporting calmly through serious g-forces, Yuri Gagarin’s voice is the one we can hear re-assuring his masters at Ground Control instead of the other way around.Everything is fine. I am feeling alert. I am continuing the flight. It’s interesting and beautiful.The ground controllers pressed the various buttons that jettisoned the booster rockets and sent Gagarin into a parabolic pradakshina of the planet. At the highest point of his orbit, Gagarin was as far away from the earth’s surface as Jaipur is from Delhi, roughly 300 km, the closest was about 90 km. Gagarin completed his orbit and his controllers instructed his remaining rockets to slam him back into the earth’s atmosphere.advertisementApparently, Gagarin nearly died when the rockets didn’t disengage from his capsule after re-entry, making the heat almost fatal.Finally, though, the rockets did let go.The capsule was back, flying in what we call air. Gagarin pressed the one important button over which he had control and the lid of the capsule blew open, ejecting him and his parachute at a height of several kilometres. The craft itself was left behind as the first spaceman descended safely back to the Russian steppes.In less than half the time it takes to drive from Delhi to Jaipur, Gagarin had gone around the earth. Before his orbit no one could say for sure what would happen to human bodies in spacecraft outside the bounds of earthly gravity.After the flight we knew that, with proper design and engineering, extremely fit human beings could survive leaving the earth and returning to it.Looking back, there is a contradictory feeling about the whole thing. On the one hand, the flight of the Vostok can be compared to the first fish that tried to use its fins to walk on sand, a major evolutionary step in the developmental story of our species. On the other hand, save the moon landings, there has been no leap comparable to that first flight – it’s as if we are still that first school of fish, unable to stray very far from water, and a long way away from developing proper amphibious characteristics. Unlike us, those pioneering, early- amphibian ancestors of ours didn’t have ( as far as we can tell) any politics, economics, wars or electorates to deal with. It was, literally, each fish for itself, or maybe small groups of them, maybe the rash teenagers, doing their dangerous capers outside the proven safety of water.War There have been many reports, of course, of various American and European lunatics with spaceships ready in their backyards, the galactic equivalents of home- made sports- cars or sail- boats, all ready to fly off, aiming for the moon and points beyond, a bit similar to the way the experiments with early flight worked. Reportedly, so far, the US and other governments have managed to put a stop to these highly expensive suicide bids but who knows, there may come a day when some loony trillionaire might secretly put together a craft that could take him or her for a spectacular joyride.These crazies aside, the business of cosmic exploration remains in the hands of the government space agencies of large and mostly rich nations, which is where the national agendas and contested budgets etc all come in.This brings us to the second set of contradictory feelings. On the one hand, most of us love the idea of someone ( not us, perhaps) soaring away into the starlit darkness, hopefully to come back with treasures, discoveries and stories of the cosmos of which we are a part. The rationalists among us also realise that one day humanity will have no choice but to go and live on other planets, because our species can now make a good guess that this particular tiny rock of ours, even with the best maintenance, actually has an expiry date as far inhabiting it goes. On the other hand, if we examine the history of how Yuri Gagarin came to be on that flight in 1961, a different set of thoughts, anxieties and angers rises up.advertisementShortly after this commemoration we will see the 70th anniversary of the huge Operation Barbarossa, that was launched by the German Wehrmacht against Stalin’s USSR. Then, from 2012 to 2015, will come various seventiethyear memorials of the defeats of that army till its final decapitation in the ruins of Berlin, in 1945. Unlike what the earlier histories of the Second World War tell us, the demise of Hitler’s regime was a messy and chaotic business, the hydraheaded monster of Nazism collapsing surprisingly quickly in places while proving shockingly resistant in others.Not least of the reasons why the supposedly super- systematic Nazi machine met such an unsystematic end was that – even as they struck at Germany’s multiple jugulars – its enemies were divided. For the last year of the War in Europe, the Soviets, the Americans and the British were involved in a fierce and complicated three- way hunting dance ( think the last, triangular showdown in ‘ The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ , with a fatally wounded but still dangerous ‘ Evil’ in the middle). The decisions made by the Soviets and the Allies at that moment would shape our history for the next fifty years.One of the most interesting American mistakes was to let Stalin’s armies reach Berlin first, imagining it was merely a symbolic prize and hoping the Russians would bear the brunt of any last- ditch fanatical resistance in the Nazi capital.Stalin, though, had information that the Germans had stockpiled enriched uranium for their new, experimental atomic device in a laboratory in a Berlin suburb.Stalin wanted Hitler and he wanted to fly the Red flag on the Reichstag but what he wanted most – and got – was this precious component for a nuclear bomb.As the Soviet armies sped west towards the destination that was secret even to their own generals, the team of Nazi scientists who had delivered the lethal V- 1 and V- 2 rockets to Hitler managed to surrender to the Americans speeding eastwards.Bomb America managed to trigger its first nuclear explosion within a couple of months of the fall of Berlin. And then, as we know, by August 1945 they were able to translate those explosions into two nuclear devices that they dropped on Japan, forcing it to surrender. The Russians eventually got their nuclear formula not from the ruins of Nazi Germany but through their spies in the USA and Britain. What they were unable to get, however, was the know- how of the Nazi team of rocket scientists; therefore they had to develop their own rockets to counter the American aeronautical behemoths. The reason why the USA and the USSR were developing powerful rockets was that it was the safest way to deliver a huge bomb upon an enemy on the other side of the planet.advertisementSpace exploration came to both countries as a spinoff of this endeavour, almost as an unrealised bonus. Now, if you twin Gagarin’s flight and Armstrong’s landing on the moon with the trillions of dollars that went into developing and making nuclear bombs and if, for a moment, you fantasise about what might have happened if this money had been spent in developing humanity as a whole, you might find yourself thinking that this April could have done just as well for the first human space flight from a healthy and peaceful planet. That might have been interesting and beautiful too.last_img read more


first_imgTwentieth Century Fox Television Distribution, the international sales arm of the Hollywood studio, has appointed Edward Anderson as vice president, international free television.Anderson is an entertainment lawyer who joins from his own law firm Anderson General & Entertainment Law. Before setting this up he worked at Sony Pictures Entertainment. He will work across all aspects of the network, cable, satellite, digital television business, including format licensing and will report to international television president Marion Edwards.“We are delighted to have Edward join our team. His legal background and experience will be a tremendous asset as we continue to grow our businesses and respond to many new demands from our clients,” said Edwards.last_img read more


first_imgLG Electronics USA has signed a deal with The Walt Disney Studios that will see 3D Disney movies added to the 3D World rental application on LG’s Smart TV platform.3D titles including Toy Story and Alice in Wonderland are now available for rental. Future titles including Marvel’s The Avengers and Brave will be added to the Smart TV platform.“Providing consumers with the latest blockbuster hits from Disney is another boost for Smart TV in the home and a perfect fit for our family approach to enjoying our home entertainment products,” said James Fishler, senior vice president, marketing and go-to-market operations, LG Electronics USA.last_img read more


first_imgComcast-owned Sky has become the latest UK Telco to make a play in 5G, announcing a November launch for the next-generation technology for Sky Mobile.The initial rollout will include six towns and cities for November, with a wider national rollout of 20 towns and cities by the end of the year. The company plans to take that total to 50 by the end of 2020. Sophia Ahmad, commercial director of Sky Mobile, said “We will be the only mobile operator to be able to combine the launch of next generation superfast 5G connectivity with Sky Mobile’s unique features including Roll, Swap and Watch.”Roll is one of Sky Mobile’s flagship features. It automatically rolls unused data over at the end of each month, and can be kept for up to three years as a data boost or exchanged for money off new devices and accessories. Swap allows users to trade in their phone midway through a contract in exchange for a newer model. Watch is Sky Mobile’s newest feature, giving access to all Sky apps – including Sky Go, Sky Sports and Sky Kids – with zero-rated data and no additional cost.Commenting on the announcement, Paolo Pescatore, media and telco analystat PP Foresight Tec said: “The mobile network operators need to watch out as this move poses a considerable threat 5G represents a significant opportunity for Sky to steal market share. It is becoming harder for telcos to differentiate on connectivity beyond price alone. Sky armed with its innovative mobile features and breath of content is very well placed to compete head on. “For now, from an overall services perspective it seems to be in pole position. However, it is largely dependent on O2’s network rollout. Moving forward you can foresee both companies becoming more closely aligned. The UK will be one of the most competitive 5G markets in the world by the end of this year.”The news comes as O2 and Vodafone announced plans to share infrastructure in order to speed up the rollout of 5G, with BT-owned EE currently the only telco offering the faster service in the UK.last_img read more