first_imgOverlooked before the season in the Big East, the No. 3-ranked Syracuse men’s basketball team has cleaned house.On Tuesday, Jim Boeheim was named Big East Coach of the Year and Wes Johnson was awarded Big East Player of the Year. Syracuse plays the winner of Georgetown vs. South Florida on Thursday in the quarterfinal round of the Big East tournament.Before this season, Syracuse was predicted to finish sixth in conference — widely billed as a wild card with replenished pieces. After finishing as the Big East’s outright regular-season champions, the Orange (28-3) has reeled in the hardware.Boeheim was honored for SU’s unlikely turnaround, while Johnson leads the balanced team in points per game (15.7), rebounds (8.5) and minutes (34.5). Johnson is the first transfer from a Division I school to win the award and the fourth-ever Syracuse winner. Hakim Warrick (2005), Billy Owens (1991) and Derrick Coleman (1990) have also won. A day earlier, Kris Joseph was named the Big East’s Sixth Man of the Year.Among a field of premier scorers — such as Villanova’s Scottie Reynolds, Notre Dame’s Luke Harangody and South Florida’s Dominique Jones — Johnson’s overall game stood out. Fighting through injuries, he has handled a wealth of minutes while scoring in double figures in 28 of Syracuse’s 31 games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor Boeheim, this is simply more hardware. As the winningest coach in Big East history, he also won Coach of the Year in 1984, 1991 and 2000. For Johnson, the news was somewhat surprising considering his numbers have ebbed of late. After a furious start, he has been hobbled by a pair of injuries.The aftershock of a head-over-heels spill against Providence and a hand injury against Connecticut has hurt Johnson’s shot. He is averaging 12.3 points in his last nine games. Others, namely Andy Rautins, have picked up the slack. Johnson recently campaigned for Rautins to win the award.thdunne@syr.edu  Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Published on March 9, 2010 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more


first_imgThe Thirds played in The Junior B final last Sunday against Ardara but unfortunately came up short on the day. However the team had a fantastic year and a lot of credit must go to Paddy Mc Ginty, his mentors and all the players for a very successful campaign.Our Under13 boys continue in the league on Wednesday Sept 17th with an away fixture to St.Eunans with throw in at 7.45pm.The Lotto numbers for this week are 2,6,10 and 23 match 3 winner is Niall Doran of Falbane Churchill. The jackpot now stands at €5180. A very successful coffee morning was held in the club on Sunday last to raise funds for the underage girls. A big thankyou to all those who sponsored on the day and to all the ladies who made all the delicious food. Thank you to Elaine Mc Fadden who coordinated the event. The ladies team played away to Termon on Monday 15th but despite leading with minutes remaining lost the game due to two late Termon goals. Finally, the club wishes Michael Neil and Cormac the very best of luck in the Finals next weekend.GAA NEWS: GLENSWILLY THIRDS COME UP SHORT AGAINST ARDARA was last modified: September 16th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DONGALGlenswilly GAAlast_img read more


first_imgThis time last year Letterkenny won the overall title of Ireland’s Most Enterprising Town.Along with the trophies came a small prize fund.Letterkenny Chamber had long discussions with the other stakeholders and after much deliberation it has decided to put some of the money towards the development of the market Square. Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce is promoting a comprehensive review of how the Market Square works as a public space and the potential use of this focal point on Main Street into the future.With the help of Donegal County Council and students from Queens University Belfast the views of people using Main Street will be sought during a day-long consultation event on Friday 6th December.Leonard Watson, President of Letterkenny Chamber explained “The Market Square when it was built was the jewel in the crown of Letterkenny Town Centre, however, over the years it has become clear that the space is not as accessible or suitable for events as was first thought. We have all stood at the square and had conversations about it.“As a Chamber we have organized events and have tried to use the band stand for various activities, but we realized we needed to be closer to the street. So, we thought this consultation fitted well with these ongoing conversations.” Individuals will be able to discuss their ideas and help inform the future use and layout of the Square as a space with potential to be used in any number of ways.The next stage, informed by comments gathered during the consultation day, is to commission a Design Competition funded by Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce from which detailed plans can be developed as the basis to implement the redevelopment of the Market Square should funding opportunities become available.This will be an on-street event taking place from 10am to 4.30pm.  Those carrying out the consultation will be located at Market Centre so call down and give your opinion.All views and opinions on the future visions for the Square are welcome and will be reflected in the design brief for the proposed design competition.Come and join us in shaping the future of this important place. Come and share your vision for Letterkenny’s Market Square this Friday was last modified: December 3rd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ConsultationdonegalletterkennyMarket Squarelast_img read more


first_imgMike Nicol’s crime novel Killer Countryhas received positive reviews.(Image: Mike Nicol) Author Margie Orford on the cover ofthe special crime issue of WordsEtc.(Image: Margie Orford)MEDIA CONTACTS • Helen HolyoakeBookEx+27 11 462 2302Chris ThurmanSouth Africans like to talk about crime. It creeps into conversations at dinner parties, in shebeens, on radio talk shows and in parliament.Perhaps it was only a matter of time, then, until all that talking fostered creative writing and reading – not just in newspaper and magazine articles or online, but in books. South Africa’s publishers, booksellers and literary communities are all in a stir over “crime lit”.Literary websites like Book SA and LitNet are dedicating an increasing proportion of their content to so-called krimis. Earlier this year, literary journal WordsEtc brought out a special issue on the phenomenon, guest edited by Joanne Hichens, herself a crime writer. The publication featured interviews with, among others, the local queen of crime fiction, Margie Orford.Most recently, the inaugural BookEx book fair in Johannesburg hosted CrimeWrite, the first festival of its kind in the country. Organiser Mike Nicol expressed some disappointment at the turnout, but affirmed nonetheless that the writers participating showed “they can deliver the goods … there is a great marketing opportunity here.”“Pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”Nicol, a self-confessed krimihead, is the doyen of the South African crime writing scene and its most ardent promoter. This is quite something for a man who used to feel only disdain for the genre.He describes his crime novels as “pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”, and is unashamed about the formulaic requirements of much popular writing – in particular, he is critical of “academics who haven’t yet got their heads around the idea that commercial fiction has a completely legitimate place in any society’s literary life”.In penning these words, Nicol no doubt had in mind a review of his book Killer Country by literary scholar Leon de Kock of Stellenbosch University. The debate amongst members of the Book SA community following this review demonstrated the false perception that professional academics look down from their ivory towers on popular books, their readers and their writers.De Kock’s review in fact praises Nicol’s writing, but poses some important questions nonetheless: what does it mean for a former writer of serious literary works to turn his hand to genre fiction? Is this a process of dumbing-down in order to gain as wide a readership as possible? And if so, what assumptions are being made about readers? More specifically, why is it that so many writers have, like Nicol, chosen to focus their careers on crime writing?These are important questions, particularly in a country such as South Africa. There are ethical implications to representing the phenomenon of crime in the pages of a book – not least because writing for entertainment and writing for edification are by no means mutually inclusive.This dilemma is linked to the problem of definition. What is crime writing? After all, you would be hard pressed to identify any South African book (including those by our Nobel Prize-winners) in which transgression of the law is not a central theme. As such, crime has always been pervasive in South African literature.A useful distinction can, however, be made between fiction and non-fiction crime writing. One of the panel discussions at the CrimeWrite festival included well-known non-fiction authors Peter Harris, Antony Altbeker, Martin Welz and Chris Marnewick – all of whom have written about true crime in earnest engagements with South Africa’s crime epidemic. For the most part, however, when people refer to crime writing they mean what Nicol himself calls “schlock fiction”. This is, more or less, writing according to a set of conventions already established by authors from countries where crime is not as serious a social problem as it is here.Vicarious gratificationThose who defend crime fiction in South Africa could present a moral case if they wished to: in a country where, all too often, justice does not take its course, krimis offer a kind of vicarious gratification. As Nicol admits, crime novels tend to conclude with the triumph of moral justice, if not of the justice system: they appeal to a reader’s “innate desire to have good stomp all over evil”.But it’s not that simple. Many crime novels, in true realist form, reject neat endings in which the goodies beat the baddies; moreover, it’s not always that easy to tell the good guys from the bad guys.“One of the things that attracted me to crime fiction,” adds Nicol, “is the moral ambiguity it creates. There are no angels.”Likewise, crime writers do not claim any moral high ground for themselves. That WordsEtc cover image of Margie Orford is suitably ambiguous: looking sombre as she pulls on a white glove, Orford could either be a detective about to get to work or a murderer about to commit a heinous crime.Quoting Raymond Chandler’s observation that “crime fiction is a parody of itself, as tongue-in-cheek as it gets”, Nicol suggests that krimis mock “the author, the novel and the reader. It’s a game. Crime fiction confronts serious social issues but simultaneously says, don’t take me seriously.”An entertaining reading experienceIndeed, there seems to be consensus among South Africa’s crime writers that their vocation is fun – just as they want the reading experience to be entertaining. Yet the awkward question remains: what happens when writing and reading pleasure involves voyeuristic violence? There are no clear answers.A glance at the promotion tables in local book retailers provides evidence enough that South African readers are not reluctant to buy crime fiction from international authors such as Stieg Larsson and Ruth Rendell. This would suggest that most consumers see krimis as a form of escapism, which may be one reason why they avoid locally-produced crime lit: it is simply too close to the bone.But the major reason is, unfortunately, that South Africans are generally still hesitant to spend their time and money on works by South African authors.As Nicol laments, “Often we need to be ratified by overseas publication before local readers will buy our books.”This trend is slowly being reversed, and more and more South African books are on the shelves. If South African crime writing does prove to be as popular as is hoped by local practitioners of the craft – from veterans such as Deon Meyer and Wessel Ebersohn to newcomers like Sara Lotz and Sifiso Mzobe – then it may well help to grow a reading culture across the country.The last word can be left to Nicol: “It’s not so much a matter of dumbing-down as a new kind of book being written. The high literature will remain but readers now have more choice when it comes to buying local fiction. The trick is to make them aware of that choice.”last_img read more


first_imgNEW YORK— David Wright singled home the winning run on a 3-0 pitch with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth inning, and the New York Mets rallied past the Milwaukee Brewers 5-4 on Saturday.Eric Campbell, subbing at first base for the injured Lucas Duda, opened the ninth with a single before Michael Blazek (1-1) walked Kevin Plawecki. Rookie pinch-hitter Matt Reynolds fouled off two bunt tries before finally getting his sacrifice down, and Curtis Granderson was intentionally walked to bring up a slumping Wright.With the crowd of 39,688 standing and chanting “Let’s go Mets!” in a steady drizzle that was getting heavier, New York’s captain took three balls and then surprisingly swung away. He sent a liner to right-center and was swarmed by happy teammates at first base.It was Wright’s first game-ending hit since July 5, 2012.Jeurys Familia (1-0) pitched a scoreless inning for the win.Granderson hit his latest leadoff homer for the Mets, and Yoenis Cespedes tied the score in the sixth with a two-run shot that chased rookie starter Zach Davies.That got Jacob deGrom off the hook after the right-hander left trailing 4-1. The 2014 NL Rookie of the Year, winless in four starts since winning his first three, struck out seven and walked three while throwing 100 pitches in five innings.Ramon Flores hit his first major league homer and knocked in three runs for Milwaukee, but Davies was unable to hold the three-run lead. Leadoff man Jonathan Villar had three hits, including an RBI single off deGrom with two outs in the fourth.Villar also doubled off the top of the left-center fence with one out in the ninth, but was thrown out aggressively trying for third on Scooter Gennett’s sharp grounder to shortstop.Granderson hit Davies’ second pitch off the facing of the second deck in right field for his fourth leadoff homer this season and second in five days. Cespedes was out in front on a 2-2 changeup but lofted it into the left-field corner for his 14th home run, which tied Colorado’s Nolan Arenado for the major league lead.Asdrubal Cabrera drove in Cespedes with a two-out single in the fourth to make it 4-2.YOU’RE OUTTA HEREMets hitting coach Kevin Long was ejected from the dugout by plate umpire Adrian Johnson after Wright was called out on strikes in the sixth.TRAINER’S ROOMBrewers: LF Ryan Braun missed his fourth consecutive game with a stiff back but was feeling better, according to manager Craig Counsell. “Definitely took a step in the right direction,” he said. Counsell reiterated it was still possible Braun could play Sunday. The slugger had back surgery in the offseason. … LHP Will Smith (sprained right knee) threw live batting practice at Citi Field and could be primed for a minor league rehab assignment soon. Without a setback, he should be activated from the disabled list by the first week of June, Counsell said. “He’s doing great. All signs are very positive. He’s ready for the next step,” the manager said. … Sidelined all season, RHP Matt Garza (strained right lat muscle) is scheduled to simulate an inning when he throws another bullpen Sunday. He threw his first one Thursday. … RHP Corey Knebel (left oblique strain) will throw another bullpen Sunday, too.Mets: Duda sat out again with a bad back that has manager Terry Collins concerned. Duda was examined by a doctor and had an MRI. He will have another test this weekend and miss Sunday’s game as well. Asked whether Duda could be sidelined longer than that, Collins said it was too early to tell. Pressed for specifics, he acknowledged Duda could have a disk problem. … Reserve infielder Wilmer Flores (strained left hamstring) is supposed to begin a minor league rehab assignment Tuesday, Collins said. Flores is eligible to come off the disabled list Friday. … Wright (spinal stenosis) returned to the lineup after a scheduled night off.UP NEXTBrewers: RHP Chase Anderson (2-5, 5.32 ERA) starts the series finale Sunday. Anderson took a no-hit bid into the eighth Tuesday in a 4-2 win over the Chicago Cubs and came within one out of his first career complete game.Mets: RHP Noah Syndergaard (4-2, 2.19) earned his first major league victory against Milwaukee in May 2015 at Citi Field. Syndergaard struck out 10 and walked none over seven innings Tuesday in a 2-0 win over Washington.MIKE FITZPATRICK, AP Baseball WriterTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more