first_img The new boss believes young players like Jack Grealish must show their worth first before being guaranteed a spot in his team. Garde takes charge for the first time on Sunday when rock bottom Villa host the Barclays Premier League leaders Manchester City. Press Association Grealish, 20, was given a prominent role under former boss Tim Sherwood but has struggled for form this season and Garde insisted the midfielder and others must knuckle down. Garde said: “Jack is among the young players. He will have an important role for Villa. There is quality in other players as well but what is important in football are two things. “The first one is talent, if you’re not talented you have no chance, but talent without hard work is nothing. “In modern football young players seem to be very impatient. Sometimes this is not their fault. This is the fault of the people around them because they play, one, two or 10 games and suddenly they are not good enough to play and everything collapses.” Garde has Micah Richards available after suspension to face his former club while Idrissa Gana could return after being rested. Villa have lost their last seven games and Garde replaced the sacked Sherwood this week in his first role since leaving Lyon in 2014. City are unbeaten in their last eight outings in all competitions but Garde believes Villa can upset the odds and shock the leaders. “Sometimes when you believe what you can do maybe things can turn on your side,” he said. “It’s a tough game to start but they are top of the league and we are bottom. They are unbeaten for eight games and played very well in Sevilla. “I would say we have nothing to lose but we are not going into the game saying we have already lost.” center_img Remi Garde has told Aston Villa’s stars to prove they are up to their relegation fight.last_img read more


first_img Italian bookmakers face cruel summer as ADM sanctions shop closures July 27, 2020 Share Di Maio’s man Giacomo Lasorella takes leadership of AGCOM August 17, 2020 After decades of decline, Italian horse racing has been thrown a lifeline in the form of the country’s latest Budget Law. Most notably, the turnover-based tax regime that has been so detrimental has been replaced by a new gross gaming revenue (GGR) tax.The GGR tax regime for horse racing is based on that already implemented in the sports betting sector. However, horse racing taxes – set at 43% for retail bets and 47% for online – remain significantly higher than the 18% and 22% that land-based and online sports betting has to deal with.  The situation has been further improved by the loosening of strict laws, with this liberalisation expected to lead to industry growth. Previously, betting on horses was restricted to official betting lists published by Italian gaming authority ADM, but the Budget Law has relaxed this. After sports betting laws were similarly relaxed, the Italian gaming market witnessed sizeable growth, and it is hoped it will have the same effect on horse racing. Additionally, the Budget Law postponed the country’s proposed new betting licenses, so to allow local municipalities time to change their laws accordingly. The existing betting shop and corner licenses have been extended for the full year, against the payment of an annual extension fee of €6000 per betting shop and €3500 per betting corner. A new tender for betting shops and corner licenses also aims to take in €410 million by the end of September. New ADM chief: Italy to keep strictest monitoring on gambling incumbents July 6, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Related Articles Submitlast_img read more


first_imgThree of the members have Brier experience.So does two of the first two rinks the Shypitka team plays against to open the eight-team spiel  — Craig Lepine of Langley and Mel Steffin of New Westminster.“We feel confident, we have a lot of experience on the team,” Thomson explained. “We can play an aggressive game and if we get up a little bit we have the skills to hopefully keep things pretty clean.”Day two Team Shypitka meets the other Kootenay rep in the tournament, Castlegar’s Myron Nichol.Joining Nichol is third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz. The Sunflower City rink opens Tuesday against Wes Craig of Victoria and Rick Pughe of New Westminster.Each team plays two games each day with the top three teams advancing to Saturday’s playoff round. Friday is set aside for tie-breakers.The top teams automatically gains a spot in Saturday’s final while the second and third squads battle to advance into the championship.“Playoffs would be ideal, finishing first would be even better,” Thomson explained.“You might get away with three losses to get into a playoff but four losses and your probably done. If you can go through with one or two losses I think you’ll have a pretty shot at finishing first.”EXTRA END: The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks is the lone rep for the Kootenays in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Championships held at the same time as the men’s in Trail. Hiram is joined by third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead Cindy Pettapiece. Fred Thomson would like to think all his years of competing in the Trail Curling Club would give his team the edge heading into play Tuesday at the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Men’s Championships.That may be the case, say, at the junior level.This is the Senior Men’s Division where skips, thirds, seconds and leads have seen more ice than an Eskimo.“It’s not going to be easy at all,” said Thomson, playing third for the Kootenay’s top seed, the Tom Shypitka rink of Cranbrook.“I understand (Trail committee) has brought in a different icemaker so he’s probably going to change up the ice somewhat.”“Plus (our rink) doesn’t see a lot of each other during the year . . . we don’t practice we don’t throw rocks together so I don’t think there will be a whole lot of home ice advantage for us.”Thomson, is joined by skip Tom Shypitka of Cranbrook, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale.last_img read more