first_imgFollowing the phenomenal success of last year’s nationally acclaimed ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’, Donegal Youth Musical Theatre (DYMT) has announced that they will return to An Grianan Theatre this summer with a brand new, reimagined revival of Lionel Bart’s West End legendary hit musical, OLIVER!Putting their own artistic stamp on one of the most famous scores in musical theatre history, the finest young actors from across the country will bring the tale of Oliver Twist to life in this vibrant recreated adaptation, featuring songs such as ‘Food Glorious Food’, ‘Consider Yourself’ and ‘I’d Do Anything’.DYMT is now recognised as one of Ireland’s most prestigious Youth Musical Theatre training companies, offering a select group of the country’s finest and most promising young actors an opportunity to experience the professional industry in Donegal each summer. DMYT. Photo: Paul Kelly.Rehearsing over a three week intensive period, successful cast members will work with some of the industry’s best regarded creatives and tutors from across Ireland, the West End and beyond.Last year ‘Phantom of the Opera’ and West End star Celinde Schoenmaker joined DYMT’s JCS team, with Rob Houchen (Cameron Mackintosh’s Les Misérables) also amongst their all-star tutors.West End actor Celinde Schoenmaker, Director Séimí Campbell with DYMT’s JCS Cast 2019Following the incredible national reviews from his adaptation of Jesus Christ Superstar, DYMT’s Artistic Director, Séimí Campbell returns from London for three weeks to direct this year’s revival.Séimí is currently working on ‘Come From Away’ (Phoenix Theatre) and ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ (Barbican Theatre), and is Resident Director on the UK premiere of ‘Amour’ (Charing Cross Theatre); all three running in the West End this summer. Irish West End and Broadway star Rachel Tucker recently encouraged all young Irish actors who wish to work in Musical Theatre to ‘start their training with the fabulous DYMT this summer – as they act as a brilliant stepping stone to London.’DMYT. Photo: Paul Kelly.Auditions for this ‘glorious’ new OLIVER! production will be held in May 2019.For more information or an audition application form, email DYMT’s Casting Team on dymtoliver@gmail.com.This new adaptation requires an older cast up to 24 years. A small children’s troop will also be cast (10-12 years). Rehearsals will run daily from 24th July – 12th August in Letterkenny, with the production running in An Grianan Theatre from Tuesday 13th – Saturday 17th August 2019.With last year’s cast travelling from as far as Belfast and Dublin, don’t miss out on this incredible introduction to your professional career this summer. Donegal Youth Musical Theatre announce casting call for OLIVER! was last modified: April 5th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:actingDonegal Youth Musical TheatreOlivertheatrelast_img read more


first_imgDating of artifacts and fossils may become much more common thanks to a new instrument.Without doubt, radiocarbon dating has been an exciting and contentious process. It has been able to resolve disputes about the construction date of archaeological sites, such as Hezekiah’s Tunnel in Jerusalem (9/10/03). Creationists find radiocarbon all over in places it shouldn’t be (see Real Science Radio’s list), such as coal and diamonds; evolutionists cry “contamination!” (Note: all radiocarbon should vanish from a sample before 100,000 years). Resolving disputes has been costly and time-consuming. Typically, the best results come from labs with equipment for accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS), but only 100 or so labs worldwide have the equipment.What would happen if you could get radiocarbon dates almost as accurate as AMS at one tenth the cost, within two hours? This may become common, if the encouraging announcement from Italy’s Istituto Nazionale di Ottica lives up to its promises. Science Daily says,The instrument, which uses a new approach called saturated-absorption cavity ring-down (SCAR), is described in The Optical Society’s journal for high impact research, Optica. SCAR offers significant time and cost savings compared to the standard approach for carbon dating and could be useful for a host of other applications such as measuring emissions from fossil fuels or certifying the amount of biogenic content in biofuels.The equipment, which works on a laser cavity principle, is smaller, faster, and cheaper. It costs a tenth of AMS. It might even become portable. Each test, furthermore, is half the cost of AMS, the article says:The researchers report that their SCAR instrument can detect radiocarbon dioxide concentration with a precision of 0.4 percent, which approaches the 0.2 percent precision of the best accelerator mass spectrometers. The new technique can deliver results in just two hours, with each test costing about half what it would if conducted using an accelerator mass spectrometer.The researchers estimate the SCAR instrument is about 100 times smaller and 10 times cheaper than the instrumentation required for accelerator mass spectrometry. Its size and cost could decrease even more once the instrument is converted from its current tabletop version to a more portable commercial prototype.The designers envision archaeologists being able to test artifacts in the field. “This could revolutionize the approach that archaeologists use for carbon dating because they would not have to send sensitive samples away to a lab and wait weeks for a result,” one of the team members said.We hope radiocarbon dates will become much easier to obtain, so that creation researchers can test samples of coal, diamond and dinosaur bone quickly and cheaply. This technique, if it fulfills the promises, could make possible multiple tests on the same sample by different labs or teams, reducing the credibility of charges about contamination. Many more samples could be dated. There should be zero radiocarbon in samples older than 100,000 years. Enough undisputed radiocarbon-positive results on “old” samples could completely undermine the evolutionary timeline. Let’s get the data! (Visited 140 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgMike Nicol’s crime novel Killer Countryhas received positive reviews.(Image: Mike Nicol) Author Margie Orford on the cover ofthe special crime issue of WordsEtc.(Image: Margie Orford)MEDIA CONTACTS • Helen HolyoakeBookEx+27 11 462 2302Chris ThurmanSouth Africans like to talk about crime. It creeps into conversations at dinner parties, in shebeens, on radio talk shows and in parliament.Perhaps it was only a matter of time, then, until all that talking fostered creative writing and reading – not just in newspaper and magazine articles or online, but in books. South Africa’s publishers, booksellers and literary communities are all in a stir over “crime lit”.Literary websites like Book SA and LitNet are dedicating an increasing proportion of their content to so-called krimis. Earlier this year, literary journal WordsEtc brought out a special issue on the phenomenon, guest edited by Joanne Hichens, herself a crime writer. The publication featured interviews with, among others, the local queen of crime fiction, Margie Orford.Most recently, the inaugural BookEx book fair in Johannesburg hosted CrimeWrite, the first festival of its kind in the country. Organiser Mike Nicol expressed some disappointment at the turnout, but affirmed nonetheless that the writers participating showed “they can deliver the goods … there is a great marketing opportunity here.”“Pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”Nicol, a self-confessed krimihead, is the doyen of the South African crime writing scene and its most ardent promoter. This is quite something for a man who used to feel only disdain for the genre.He describes his crime novels as “pulp fiction with hardboiled prose”, and is unashamed about the formulaic requirements of much popular writing – in particular, he is critical of “academics who haven’t yet got their heads around the idea that commercial fiction has a completely legitimate place in any society’s literary life”.In penning these words, Nicol no doubt had in mind a review of his book Killer Country by literary scholar Leon de Kock of Stellenbosch University. The debate amongst members of the Book SA community following this review demonstrated the false perception that professional academics look down from their ivory towers on popular books, their readers and their writers.De Kock’s review in fact praises Nicol’s writing, but poses some important questions nonetheless: what does it mean for a former writer of serious literary works to turn his hand to genre fiction? Is this a process of dumbing-down in order to gain as wide a readership as possible? And if so, what assumptions are being made about readers? More specifically, why is it that so many writers have, like Nicol, chosen to focus their careers on crime writing?These are important questions, particularly in a country such as South Africa. There are ethical implications to representing the phenomenon of crime in the pages of a book – not least because writing for entertainment and writing for edification are by no means mutually inclusive.This dilemma is linked to the problem of definition. What is crime writing? After all, you would be hard pressed to identify any South African book (including those by our Nobel Prize-winners) in which transgression of the law is not a central theme. As such, crime has always been pervasive in South African literature.A useful distinction can, however, be made between fiction and non-fiction crime writing. One of the panel discussions at the CrimeWrite festival included well-known non-fiction authors Peter Harris, Antony Altbeker, Martin Welz and Chris Marnewick – all of whom have written about true crime in earnest engagements with South Africa’s crime epidemic. For the most part, however, when people refer to crime writing they mean what Nicol himself calls “schlock fiction”. This is, more or less, writing according to a set of conventions already established by authors from countries where crime is not as serious a social problem as it is here.Vicarious gratificationThose who defend crime fiction in South Africa could present a moral case if they wished to: in a country where, all too often, justice does not take its course, krimis offer a kind of vicarious gratification. As Nicol admits, crime novels tend to conclude with the triumph of moral justice, if not of the justice system: they appeal to a reader’s “innate desire to have good stomp all over evil”.But it’s not that simple. Many crime novels, in true realist form, reject neat endings in which the goodies beat the baddies; moreover, it’s not always that easy to tell the good guys from the bad guys.“One of the things that attracted me to crime fiction,” adds Nicol, “is the moral ambiguity it creates. There are no angels.”Likewise, crime writers do not claim any moral high ground for themselves. That WordsEtc cover image of Margie Orford is suitably ambiguous: looking sombre as she pulls on a white glove, Orford could either be a detective about to get to work or a murderer about to commit a heinous crime.Quoting Raymond Chandler’s observation that “crime fiction is a parody of itself, as tongue-in-cheek as it gets”, Nicol suggests that krimis mock “the author, the novel and the reader. It’s a game. Crime fiction confronts serious social issues but simultaneously says, don’t take me seriously.”An entertaining reading experienceIndeed, there seems to be consensus among South Africa’s crime writers that their vocation is fun – just as they want the reading experience to be entertaining. Yet the awkward question remains: what happens when writing and reading pleasure involves voyeuristic violence? There are no clear answers.A glance at the promotion tables in local book retailers provides evidence enough that South African readers are not reluctant to buy crime fiction from international authors such as Stieg Larsson and Ruth Rendell. This would suggest that most consumers see krimis as a form of escapism, which may be one reason why they avoid locally-produced crime lit: it is simply too close to the bone.But the major reason is, unfortunately, that South Africans are generally still hesitant to spend their time and money on works by South African authors.As Nicol laments, “Often we need to be ratified by overseas publication before local readers will buy our books.”This trend is slowly being reversed, and more and more South African books are on the shelves. If South African crime writing does prove to be as popular as is hoped by local practitioners of the craft – from veterans such as Deon Meyer and Wessel Ebersohn to newcomers like Sara Lotz and Sifiso Mzobe – then it may well help to grow a reading culture across the country.The last word can be left to Nicol: “It’s not so much a matter of dumbing-down as a new kind of book being written. The high literature will remain but readers now have more choice when it comes to buying local fiction. The trick is to make them aware of that choice.”last_img read more